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Buckinghamshire Sessions Records: Volume 2. 1694-1705

County of Buckingham

CALENDER

to the

SESSIONS RECORDS

VOLUME II.

1694 to 1705

Edited by

WILLIAM LE HARDY, M.C., F.S.A.

GEOFFREY LI.  RECKITT, M.C., M.A.

 

AYLESBURY:

Published by Guy R. Crouch, LL.B., Clerk of the Peace, County Hall.

1936

COMPILED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE BUCKINGHAMSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS AND COUNTY COUNCIL.

[All Rights Reserved]

Printed by HUNT, BARNARD & CO., LTD., AYLESBURY.

 

CONTENTS

 

PAGE

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . .vii

Schedule of Offences and Punishments . . xxxiv

Calendar to the Sessions Records, 1694 to 1705 1-453

Appendix I. Justices of the Peace, 1694 to  1705 . . . . . . . . . . . . 454-456

Appendix II. SHERIFFS, 1694 to 1705 . . 456

Index . . . . . . . . . . . .  457

PREFACE

This present volume, which embraces a period from Midsummer, 1694, to Epiphany, 1704-05, and forms Volume II of the Calendar to the Sessions Records of the County of Buckingham, is a continuation of the first volume of the series, published in 1933.

Although only forty-three Sessions have been covered, as against sixty-four Sessions in the previous volume, the three Quarter Sessions Books which have been calendared—Books 4, 5, and 6—contain more pages in the original than the first three Books, and, starting from Easter, 1700, fifteen bundles of the Quarter Sessions Rolls have been incorporated.  It is obvious that only a small proportion of the original Sessions Rolls has been preserved, and it will be seen that they have not always been collected into bundles in the correct chrono- logical order.  In most cases, the Rolls only confirm or supplement the entries from the Sessions Books, but in certain instances they do introduce new matter.  Examples of the former are the occupations and residences of the jurymen, and those summoned but not sworn, the full particulars of Sacrament Certificates, and the names of witnesses to indictments; examples of the latter are writs addressed to the Sheriff, Calendars of the Bridewells, and certain Informations.  The references to the Rolls are made in heavy type at the end of the entry concerned.

We remarked in the preface to Volume I that the original Sessions Books were most fully and carefully kept, and the same comment applies to the books from which this Calendar has been compiled.  However, by referring back some of the longer recurrent entries to Volume I, by a great deal of cross-referencing, and by even more drastic standardization, it has been possible to reduce the size of this Calendar, in spite of the extra material with which we have had to deal.  This reduction has, of course, been effected 

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viii PREFACE

without departing from the most necessary principle that some reference, however brief, must be made to every subject, person, or place which appears in the original records.

It will be noticed that the page numbers of the original books have been italicized in order to simplify cross-reference and to avoid confusion with the page numbers of the printed volume.  For this idea we are indebted to the writer of a review of Volume I in one of the County newspapers, whose scholarly and constructive criticisms were most welcome. With more space at our disposal in these Calendars we should have adopted several more of his valuable suggestions.

The very completeness of this record of the proceedings of Quarter Sessions makes it appear most formidable and tedious to read, with its long lists of names and its succession of cases of minor importance.  However, the index will direct the student to any particular item in which he is interested, and we will attempt in a short survey of the volume, to show the ordinary reader how the Calendar, which at first appears to be of merely local interest, connects with contemporary English history.

In the first Session we are brought up against the out- side world by a reference to the “warr against France” (page 11), and realize that the country was still apprehensive of adherents to the Stuart cause when Henry Munday, an innholder of Aylesbury, was bound over to appear at the Assizes and answer a charge “concerning his drinking King James his health” (page 13).  Although the result of this case would not appear in the records of Quarter Sessions, it is probable that it was not proved against Munday, for he was made keeper of Aylesbury Bridewell two years later (page 83).  It may have been this case which upset Charles Noy, a bodice-maker of Aylesbury, who had been a petty constable of the parish at the time of Munday’s recognizance.  Noy’s complaint, repeated at two Petty Sessions in 1696, was that “there was Treason against King William sworne before two Justices of the Peace and there was no notice taken of it”; but, upon being asked to name the two Justices, he would only say, “I will not do it, for King William can have no Justice here and I will go upp and acquaint the King and Councill with it.”  He eventually did “go upp” to the King’s Bench, for he was indicted for libelling William 

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PREFACE ix

Busby and Francis Ligo, two of the Justices, and his case was removed by writ of certiorari (pages 85, 91, 101).

This same year, 1696, was marked by the discovery of the “Assassination Plot,” directed against William III, and by the formation of the Association to protect the King’s life and the Protestant Succession.  The Association was modelled upon one formed in 1585 to protect the life of Queen Elizabeth, and another similar to it was started after the Rebellion of 1745.  It began as a resolution of the House of Commons, and was later embodied into an Act of Parlia- ment (7 and 8 William III, c. 27), which made the signing of it obligatory upon all office-holders.  Unfortunately, the first list of those persons in the County who signed the Association is not preserved, for the names were entered on the Sessions Rolls, which are no longer to be found for that date.  The names of those who signed it later are given at each Session up to the King’s death, and include Samuel Lee of Upper Winchendon, “breadmaker to the King.”  The text of the Association is given in full in the Calendar (pages 90, 93, 174).  The Clerk of the Peace was paid £5 for sending out copies of the Association to the bailiffs of the various hundreds, and the bailiffs were paid £2 each for distributing them amongst “the Gentlemen and Inhabitants of this County.”  Thomas Read, bailiff of the Aylesbury Hundreds, was also paid £1 “for his good service to the Countrey in searching for Armes suspected to have bene Lodged or gotten into the Custody of disaffected persons for the dis- turbance of the Government” (page 87).

In 1696, Henry Lloyd, or Floyd, of Dorney, gentleman, was fined £2 for refusing to take the statutory oaths (page 82), and two years later a warrant was issued for his arrest on a charge “of haveing uttered Treasonable words against the person of his most sacred Majestie King William the Third, and [being] a person disaffected to the Government as now established, and of wicked and dangerous principles.”  It was stated at the time that he “privily lurks and hides himself in divers obscure places,” and nothing more was heard of the matter except the estreating of his recognizance to appear on another charge (pages 167, 171).

At the end of the war of the Grand Alliance, in 1697, the Justices and the Grand Jury sent a most fulsome address to the King, which “was most cheerfully signed by them all.” 

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x PREFACE

The address began by referring to the “infinite dangers to which your sacred person so often hath been exposed” and by expressing the “joy for your safety and the blessing of an honorable peace, which we hope your Majestie may long enjoy with us and never more hazard your Royall person abroad.”  It continued with an artless reference to William’s personal unpopularity with many in the country, by suggesting that his military triumphs, coupled with his “wise conduct” in rescuing England from “Popery and Arbitrary power,” should “melt the most ungratefull of your people to a willing obedience and render your Majestie no less a Conqueror at home then you have appeared abroad.” A crescendo of flattery was attained when the address stated “that in all future Ages Cronicles will worthily Characterize you to be The true defender of the faith, The deliverer of oppressed Nations, and the Redeemer and Asserter of the Common Liberties of Europe” (page 157).

The King himself, in a proclamation at Easter, 1698, referred to the end of the “long bloudy and expensive war” and to “the Conclusion of an Honorable peace” (page 169). This peace, that of Ryswyck in September, 1697, lasted only five years, for the War of the Spanish Succession began in May, 1702, two months after the King’s death.  In fact, England was at war with France during more than half of the years dealt with by this Calendar.

Upon the accession of Queen Anne, office-holders were again required to take an oath, this time abjuring any allegiance to “the person . . . pretending to be and taking upon himself the stile and title of King of England, by the name of James the Third.”  Lists of persons taking the oath of abjuration contained in 1 Anne, c. 22, are given each Session, including those of about 340 persons who signed at Midsummer, 1702.  This Session was adjourned from Aylesbury to High Wycombe, Chesham, Newport Pagnell and Buckingham on successive days, for the sake of persons who “by reason of theire greate age and other infirmityes” could not attend the Session at Aylesbury (pages 330-334, 339).

In this connection it is interesting to note the pre- dominance of Aylesbury as a town for holding the Sessions. Of the 107 Sessions so far dealt with in these two Volumes of the Calendar, forty-four were held at Aylesbury.  High 

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PREFACE xi

Wycombe was increasing in importance, and twenty Sessions were held there.  At Buckingham, the County town, only fifteen were held, mostly at the beginning of the period, and between Midsummer, 1688, and Midsummer, 1699, none at all took place there.  The only other towns which had the Sessions were Wendover (11), Chesham (9), and Amersham (8); two Sessions were adjourned to Newport Pagnell.  It will be seen that the centre and the south of the County were, somewhat naturally, favoured at the expense of the northern parts.

The wars, both civil and foreign, in which England had been involved for so many years, inevitably produced many discharged soldiers and sailors, who applied to the Court for relief.  Some of them were very old men, as, for instance, Geoffrey Savage of Winslow, who in 1697, was admitted to a County pension of £2 at the age of 86, for his service under Spencer and James, second and third Earls of Northumber- land (page 125).  In the same year, Arthur Totnall had his pension increased to £4 on account of his faithful service to Charles I (page 113).  In 1699, two Civil War soldiers were given grants (page 225).  At Epiphany, 1702-03, Robert Anderton, who had served “that sacred martyr King Charles the First . . . and had beene a great sufferer and much wounded,” was refused an increase in his pension in view of “the lowness of the County Stock, which of late has beene greately exhausted”; but, on his further application at the next Session, his appeal was allowed (pages 361, 378).  As late as 1704, an increase of pension was granted to a man who had served Charles I in the Civil War (page 429).  The widow of Richard Brugis, who “had greatly impaired his Estate” in the service of Charles I (see Bucks  Sessions Records, Volume I, page x), was given £2 10s. out of the County stock (page 105).

William Burrall, a soldier under General Monck during the Commonwealth and under Prince Rupert after the Restoration, was at first refused a pension, as he had not produced a certificate from any of “the Field Officers of the Regiment wherein hee served . . . as by the Statute is required”; a year later he produced the certificate, and the pension was granted (pages 55, 113).  Andrew Miller, an apothecary of High Wycombe, went through the same procedure.  He later applied for an increase in his pension, 

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xii PREFACE

which the Court refused “in regard it was considered the County Stock could not bear soe great an Inlargment” (pages 66, 86, 215).  Edward Billington was granted a pension in 1696, but must in some way have forfeited it, for one was again given him in 1700.  He was an impressed man who had been badly wounded at “the taking of the Castle of Namur in Flanders” from the French in 1695 (pages 75, 248).  Members of the garrisons of Dunkirk (page 214) and Tangier (page 145) also applied for relief.  The former town was sold by Charles II to Louis XIV for £500,000 in 1662, and the latter was evacuated, and all its defences destroyed, in 1684.

Amongst the sailors who petitioned for pensions were William Penn, who served in The Souldadoes in the Dutch War (page 187), Christopher Martin, who served for four years during the reign of Charles II in The Yarmouth (page 225), Benjamin Young, who served for four years during the war of the Grand Alliance in The Albemarle (page 214), and Charles Sutton, who claimed in 1703 “that he had served her Majestie on shipboard in the present Warr against France and was thereby wounded and disabled” (page 398). Another ship of war is mentioned when a deserter from “his Majestyes Ship the Sandwich” was sent to the bridewell at High Wycombe, pending his removal by the Sheriff (page 93).

Various methods of finding recruits for the Army and Navy are illustrated in the Calendar.  Impressment was one of the main sources.  In 1698, the keeper of the bridewell at High Wycombe asked to be repaid the money spent by him upon “twelve men imprest for his Majesties service at sea” who had been sent to him to detain until they were “put on board his Majesties Navy Royall” (page 154). In 1701, the names of six “pressed men” from the County and twenty-three from Northamptonshire were given by the bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell in his Calendar of prisoners (page 291).  A “Vagrant and Wandring Seaman” was impressed at Buckingham in 1702, leaving his child to be maintained by the County (page 338).  In 1703, the Privy Council issued an order to the Justices, “commanding them to forbeare Impresting of any more Seamen for this winter service,” presumably because the need for soldiers was then more urgent (page 364).  In 1701, a “vitious and theivish” apprentice, whose master did not know “what to do with him 

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PREFACE xiii

or how to govern him,” was sent to sea by the Justices (page 295).

Under the provisions of the acts of 1 Anne, c. 25, and 2 and 3 Anne, c. 16, five “insolvent debtors” were released from prison upon their “voluntary enlistment” in the Army (pages 364, 432, 433).  The names of thirteen vagrants are given as having been brought in by the constables to be enlisted in accordance with the act of 2 and 3 Anne, c. 19, “for Raising Recruits for the Land forces and Marines” (pages 426, 436, 437), and, at Epiphany 1704-05, the constables were ordered to put this act into “vigorous execution” by making “diligent search . . . for all such able bodied men . . . as have not any lawfull calleing or Imployment or visible meanes for theire maintenance and Livelyhood and that have noe vote in Electing of any member . . . to serve in Parliament” (pages 448, 449). Various offenders were given their chance of escaping punishment by “voluntary enlistment,” and we read of men awaiting trial in the bridewells being discharged direct into the Army (pages 448, 453).

The names of the commanders of the regiments into which these men were enlisted, and the names of many of those under whom the pensioners had served, will be found in the index.

The billeting rates for soldiers, in accordance with the annual Mutiny Act, are given for the years 1702, 1703, and 1704.  They only differ in one item from the rates given in Volume I (at pages 380-381), namely, in the allowance of 6d. a night for stabling the horse of a “Commission Officer of horse” (pages 324-325, 383, 422).  The rates provided evidently did not satisfy those upon whom soldiers were quartered, for, in 1696, Thomas Woodward, one of the con- stables of Aylesbury, was indicted for quartering “14 foot- soldiers at the King’s and Queen’s Head and 1 officer and 8 foot-soldiers at the Saracen’s Head, but none at his own inn or that of Thomas Hill.”  Woodward was dismissed from his office because of “severall notorious Complaints” (pages 91, 94).

After the war of the Grand Alliance the regulations contained in the act of 5 Elizabeth, c. 4, which insisted upon apprenticeship to trades, were relaxed in order to assist the demobilization of the Army.  This produced a protest from 

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xiv PREFACE

the inhabitants of Chesham, who complained “that divers Scotch Soldiers lately disbanded under Umbrage of the late Act of Parliament . . . that provides liberty for disbanded Soldiers exercising of Trades in Markett townes have come into their said parish with their families to settle accordingly and are likely to become chargeable thereunto” (page 247).  This same act, 10 and 11 William III, c. 11, provided a remedy, in another section, to complaints similar to that of Thomas Jenkins and Thomas Hebburne, who stated, in 1696, “that they were both souldiers in his Majesties service for six years and disabled in the said service and upon their Return home have bene arrested for their Debts and thrown into Goal” (page 105).  According to the act of 1699, disbanded soldiers were freed from arrest for three years in respect of debts contracted before their enlistment.

The Militia is mentioned when the accounts of the “Weekes Tax,” imposed by the act of 13 and 14 Charles II, c. 3, were certified by the Deputy-Lieutenants and confirmed by the Court (pages 43, 88, 206, 405).

Two references to Parliamentary elections appear in the Calendar.  In Epiphany 1700-01, a Committee of the Justices reported that they had been unable to obtain a quorum at one of their meetings owing to “the Election of Knights for this County” (page 274).  This was the election which gave rise to the famous Aylesbury Election dispute (see Victoria County History, Bucks, Vol. IV, pages 546-47). Two of the candidates in this election, Sir Thomas Lee and Simon Mayne, were members of this Committee of Justices. Two years later, a man complained that Thomas Read, the landlord of the King’s Head at Aylesbury, had assaulted him at the inn “on the second day of the election of the Knights of the Shire” (page 356).  The latter election was probably that of December, 1701, when Sir Thomas Lee was eventually returned for Aylesbury, having been replaced by Robert Dormer in the election of 1700, after a petition to the House of Commons.

Various duties were imposed by Act of Parliament during the period and are of general interest.  The duty upon “vellum parchment and paper” was levied for four years by the act of 5 and 6 William and Mary, c. 21, for “carrieing on a warr against France”; and it was provided, amongst other things, that all copies of orders of Court must be 

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PREFACE xv

written on stamped paper, “the persons who take the benefitt of such Copies paying the Clerke of the Peace 6d. extraordinary for every Copie . . . under a very great penalty on the persons who shall neglect the same” (page 11).

In 1694, there was a complaint that those “who doe make Sydar and Sell it by the great” were being made to pay duty by the Excise officers, “whereas by Law the Retayler is only Chargeable,” and that “the said officers doe take upon them under Colour of Secureing the said Dutyes to dis- courage and interrupt the Sale of such Sydar to the great Damage of the makers thereof” (page 22).

The salt tax, imposed by the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 31, “for carrying on the Warr against France,” was of more importance, and the Justices, by virtue of the powers given them in the act, were constantly altering the price at which salt might be sold in the County.  In 1696, the price was fixed at 4s. 4d. a bushel for “Newcastle Salt, Wayne Salt, and other Salt unrefined made within this Realm,” and 7s. 6d. for “Bay Salt and other Foreign Salt,” which rates were increased to 6s. and 8s. respectively in the next Session, but were reduced later.  In 1699, a flat rate of 7s. was imposed, and this was reduced, first to 6s. 2d. and later to 5s. 6d., at which rate it remained until the end of the period (pages 93, 106, 204, 247, 278, etc.).  Salt was largely used by the agricultural population at this time. The difficulty of keeping cattle alive during the winter was so great that a very large proportion of beasts were slaughtered and salted.  In a petition to Parliament, in 1703, from another part of England it was stated that the high price of salt was “a grievance to the poorer sort of people, who mostly feed on salted provisions.”

In 1696, the window tax “for makeing good the deficiency of the Clipped money,” was started by the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 18; it was continued for over a hundred and fifty years.  Appeals against the tax were heard in 1697 (pages 147, 148, 154), and two indictments were heard in connection with it, one for perjury and one for molesting the “collector of the King’s duty” in the execution of his office (page 150).

The act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 6, for “the more easy Recovery of small tyths,” produced the hearing of five appeals (pages 173, 204, 391).

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Several persons applied for relief to compensate them for losses sustained by fire, against which probably only one or two persons in London were insured at this date.  A grant of £2 amongst six persons at Winslow was made in 1697 (page 133), £5 was given to William Church of Wooburn a year later in respect of “a dreadful fire” which completely destroyed his house and mills (page 171), and at the same Session £30 was distributed amongst seven men whose houses had been burnt down at Princes Risborough (page 172). In the case of a more serious fire, where the losses were so considerable that the money at the disposal of the Court would not be sufficient to repair the damage done, the Justices were asked to approve of a certificate, addressed to the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal and asking him to grant Letters Patent “to collect the Charitable benevolence of well disposed people” throughout the country.  Such a certificate was granted when 197 “Bayes of Building” were burnt out in three hours at Haddenham in 1701, and the damage was assessed at £3,715 (page 288).  The burning down of the Horseshoe Inn at Stony Stratford in 1703 was responsible for damage to the extent of £670, of which a considerable amount was in respect of goods bought in London and then on their way by carrier to Lancashire. The Sessions Rolls supply some interesting details of the losses (pages 405-407).

That it was necessary to investigate these claims is shown when Lawrence Oxley of Aylesbury was indicted and fined two guineas “for altering his name and Cheating the Country by Collecting money by pretended losses by a fire in Walton, when in truth he susteined no damage thereby” (pages 229, 238).

A different type of certificate issued by the Justices is seen in 1699, when they certified that Ferdinand Shrimpton and two other lace-buyers had, in open court, taken an oath, “that the Bonelace which he, this Deponent, Exposeth to sale is of the making of him and his Servants, and that he doth not Expose to sale any Bonelace or other goods or wares save what are made as aforesaid.”  The making of bone-lace, or pillow lace, was one of the most important industries in the County at this period and is reputed to have been initiated by Catherine of Aragon during her residence in Buckinghamshire when separated from Henry VIII. 

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Ferdinand Shrimpton, who was eight times mayor of High Wycombe, was a well-known lace-maker (page 193).

The Justices still fixed the rates for the carriage of goods and for Servants’ wages at each Easter Session.  (See Volume I, pages 227-229 and 426.) The former remained unchanged and the latter were only altered in one respect, when, at Easter 1697, the wages for “Free Masons by the day without meat and drink” were reduced from 1s. 8d. to 1s. (page 125).  In 1700, the Justices “of the Vale and Chiltern parts of this County” were ordered to “consider whether the wages appointed this present Sessions ought to be from henceforth continued or if they see cause to make any alteration therein” (page 249).  The order was continued at the next Easter Session, but no report was ever made.  In several cases, the Justices ordered masters to pay wages due to servants in their employment (pages 131, 222, 223), and Mary Science, who refused to enter the service which the overseers of Turville had found for her, was committed to the bridewell; she was present in Court, but “offered nothing materiall in her Excuse, onely expressed an unwillingness to labour, which may be of ill Example to lazy and thriftless people” (page 184).

Apprentices also came under the jurisdiction of the Court.  Edward Learhead was fined 3s. 4d. for refusing to take back an apprentice (page 18); the indenture of Richard Stevens was cancelled after he had “without any just provocation run three times away from his Master and had deceived his Master in money intrusted with him” (page 101); two idle apprentices were in custody at the bridewell at High Wycombe in 1702 (page 355); an apprentice, who had absented himself for a long time, was ordered to return to his master (page 449); and, as already noted above, a “vitious and theivish boy” was sent to sea (page 294). The overseers of Ivinghoe gave evidence, in 1699, that four persons had refused to accept apprentices, in defiance of the acts of 43 Elizabeth, c. 2., and 8 and 9 William III, c. 30, but three of them eventually accepted apprentices (pages 214, 256).  In 1696, six poor children of Brill “whose parents are not thought able to maintain them,” were apprenticed “to persons fitt to receive and instruct them in Husbandry and Houswifry,” and twenty-six more children were similarly apprenticed in 1698 (pages 74, 170).  Five years later the 

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Court was informed that there were still some poor children at Brill who refused “to goe out and hire att service” but preferred to “cohabitt with theire parents whoe are not of ability to maintayne themselves or theire said children.” It was ordered that the children should “forthwith place and putt themselves out att Service, otherwise the parents of such children to have noe releif or Collection” (page 399).

Conversely, it was objected that certain persons had taken apprentices who were not able to maintain them.  The inhabitants of Hanslop complained that the overseers of Kislingbury, co. Northampton, had apprenticed three poor children with a poor man in their parish “who for the Lucre of Gain had Entertained them and undertaken their education.” They were advised to apply for a removal order, so as to avoid the risk of the children becoming chargeable to the parish, and in this they were successful (pages 256, 269). The inhabitants of Wendover complained that John Passe “a Scotch Pedlar,” had taken in a number of apprentices and had then deserted his family.  The result of this case is not given (page 265).

Two of the “County children” were apprenticed during this period, namely Damaris Bright and Alice Maxfield, both of whom were born in the gaol to mothers who had been sentenced for felony.  Damaris Bright was first bound to John Hawkes, a tailor of Aylesbury, but the persons to whose care she had been entrusted since birth claimed that she had “sometime before voluntarily placed herself with them . . . as their servant.”  As the child “expressed some reluctance to depart from them and insinuated that shee might be continued in their service,” the informal apprenticeship was confirmed (pages 132, 141).  Alice Maxfield was bound over to Elizabeth Herbert, a bone-lace buyer of Winslow, when she was aged eleven years, and her mistress was allowed £1 to make up deficiencies in her clothing, when she complained that she only received “a Gowne and Petticoate” instead of “double apparell of all sorts” (pages 408, 418).

Another “County child” was the infant daughter of Alice Heritage, “a prisoner under sentence of death”; the child died very shortly after (pages 143, 155).  William, the son of Jane Whitbread, a felon in the gaol, was also supported by the County, and was given the same allowance that Alice Maxfield had received (page 352).  The County also took 

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over the maintenance of “a certaine Child borne att Breda beyond the Seas,” whose father, “a Vagrant and Wandring Seaman, was taken upp and Imprest for Her Majesties Service” (page 338).

The administration of the Poor Law occupied much of the time of the Court.  The main acts concerned were that of 43 Elizabeth, c. 2, (1601) as regards relief, and that of 13 and 14 Charles II, c. 12, (1662) as regards settlement. The index will show the large number of allowances ordered by the Court to be paid by the overseers to poor persons, and the appeals against such orders.  In 1697, Elizabeth Miles complained that the overseers of Aylesbury refused to pay her any allowance unless her daughter, who “payes her house rent and administers to her,” agreed to wear “a badg according to the late Act of Parliament,” and a similar appeal from another woman appears on the same page.  In both cases, the appeal was allowed (page 144).  In 1704, the wife of a soldier was given an allowance on the understanding that she and her four children should wear “the Badge” (page 408).  The act referred to was that of 8 and 9 William III, c. 30, which provided, in section 2, that all persons in receipt of relief from the parish, “and the wife and children of any such person cohabiting in the same house (such child only excepted, as shall be by the church-wardens and overseers of the poor permitted to live at home, in order to have the care of and attend an impotent and helpless parent) shall upon the shoulder of the right sleeve of the uppermost garment of every such person, in an open and visible manner, wear such badge or mark as is herein after mentioned and expressed, that is to say, a large Roman P. together with the first letter of the name of the parish or place whereof such poor person is an inhabitant, cut either in red or blue cloth.”  The penalty for refusing to wear the badge was the withdrawal of the relief, whipping, and twenty-one days hard labour in the bridewell, and the churchwardens were liable to a fine of £1 for relieving any poor person who did not wear the badge.

As regards settlement, well over two hundred cases were dealt with by the Court during the eleven years under review.  Of these, about 40 warrants were confirmed without any appeal being lodged, 95 appeals from warrants were allowed, and 85 were dismissed.

The passing of vagrants and “cripples” through the 

B*

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County gave rise to many disputes.  To ascertain the “direct road” for passing vagrants between Loughton and Fenny Stratford the evidence of “a skilfull surveyor” and two men over sixty years old was required (page 43).  Other cases involving the question of the “direct road” were that concerning the passing of “cripples” from Newport Pagnell (page 253) and those which dealt with passing along the London Road (pages 102 etc., 222).  Internal disagreements over passing between the Borough and the Forrens of High Wycombe (page 86), and between the Parson’s Fee and the Lord’s Fee at Aylesbury (page 103), were also settled.

After there had been many complaints of illegal passing, the Court ordered, at Epiphany 1699-1700, that in future the provisions of the act of 39 Elizabeth, c. 4, should be strictly followed, and that no passes signed by the Justices or other officers of “foreign Counties” should have any effect; the parish officers were to act on a pass only when it was signed by two or more Justices for the County (page 231). It will be seen from another entry that there were further statutes in force which affected the arrest and passing of vagrants, namely 39 Elizabeth, c. 17, and 1 James 1, c. 4 and c. 7 (page 168), and later the rates for passing were fixed by the act of 1 Anne, stat. 2, c. 13.  By this act, the constables were allowed to charge 3d. a day for maintaining a vagrant, 3d. a mile for conveying a vagrant by foot, and 6d. a mile “by horse, cart, or carriage”; if the journey was longer than ten miles, and it was impossible to return the same night, 9d. a mile might be charged (page 417).  The laws against vagrants were several times published and circulated amongst the officers of the County (pages 168, 204, 312), and, in 1703, a Committee of Justices was appointed to meet in London to consider “all matters relateing to the passeing and carryeing of Vagrants.”  They were to present a report at the next Session, but no such report appears in the Calendar (page 399).

The laws were in some cases most brutally administered. The constables of Wing arrested two children, aged four and two years, as vagrants and “openly whipped” them “as wandring beggars.”  They then sent the children by pass to Stewkley, whose inhabitants declared that such “arrogant doeings of the said Constables of Wing deserve very publique discountenance.”  The Court ordered that in future no constable should “correct or whip as vagrants any Children 

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under the age of seaven years” (page 177).  The constables of Chesham arrested Ann Hone, a vagrant suffering from small-pox, and sent her with an illegal pass to the County of Middlesex.  In the pass, the Vicar (who should have known better) and the constables of the parish admitted that when she was arrested she was “sick and weak and in a low condition and that they had relieved and whipped her.” When she reached Middlesex she was turned back and eventually came to Beaconsfield, where the officers, noting her “low and weak condition” and the fact that the small- pox was “visibly upon her,” had no option but to take her in and provide for her, “at great expense and at great risk to the health of their parish.”  This conduct was described by the Court as “not onely Inhumane (their own certificate shewing that in the sad and languishing condition of the woman they whipped her and exposed her to the Cold) but contrary to law and the rules and Orders of this Court.” The Vicar and the constables were ordered to be bound over to appear and answer for their behaviour, but nothing more was heard of the matter (pages 231-2).

The case of Thomas Widdows is a most interesting one in connection with the laws governing passing and settlement. He was a lame boy, aged sixteen, who was arrested at Kingswood and sent by pass to Oxford, his birthplace, “without being punished as by Law is directed.”  No parish in Oxford being indicated in the pass, he was returned to Kingswood and from there was sent to the bridewell at Aylesbury under a Justices’ warrant.  Here he came “under the hands of one Mr. Pitcher, a surgeon, and hath lately had one of his feete cutt of and the other soe disabled that hee will be a Cripple and unable to doe any Service.”  Several questions arose here; where was he to be sent, who was to pay Mr. Pitcher, and who was to pay the bridewell-keeper for his maintenance? The Court decided that the expense of the last two items should be met from the County stock, and that, as “there is noe Hospital in this County,” he should be settled at Kingswood, “the last place from which he had been passed as a vagrant without having received the punishment on which the law insisted” (page 379).

The cases of Elizabeth Mushett and Elizabeth Thompson, which may be followed by means of the index, are also instructive, especially for one entry in the latter case when 

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the Court paid £1. 10s. to Alexander Olliffe “as a Gratuity for what he hath done or shall doe” in discovering Elizabeth Thompson’s place of settlement or in apprehending her husband (page 450).

The raising of the money for the poor rates occasioned several queries upon the interpretation of the acts (pages 176, 213, 222).  The cost of passing vagrants became so heavy that it was necessary to draw upon the money in the hands of the treasurers for the maimed soldiers (pages 276, 289).  The act of 11 and 12 William III, c. 18, later authorized the money collected for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea being used for this purpose, but in 1701 the chief constables complained that these methods had made their accounts “intricated and perplexed,” and that they had difficulty in getting back from the treasurers “any debts of surplusage” over what they themselves had received from the petty constables.  The Court admitted that the King’s Bench and Marshalsea money was insufficient, and again ordered that the maimed soldiers’ money should be drawn upon (page 296). In the next year, the Justices used the further powers given them by the act, and imposed a County rate to raise the money; the proportion of the assessments in this and the following year are given.  It is interesting to note that “the borough and parish of Buckingham and the borough and corporation of Chepping Wiccombe” successfully claimed exemption from the assessments (pages 314, 324, 349), the former having previously claimed exemption from the jurisdiction of the Court in another matter (page 295).

Two charities for the poor are mentioned, namely, the Poor Folks’ Pasture for the benefit of the poor of Brill and that for the benefit of the poor of Oakley.  Both these charities were founded in 1623, and the trust estates were situated in Boarstall.  They are now administered by the Charity Commission (pages 94, 221, 273, 381, 419, 432).

Only three of the County bridges appear to have cost anything for their upkeep.  £20 was spent upon Long Bridge in Thornborough in 1702, and the repairs to Ickford Bridge in the same year cost £58, which was raised by means of a special rate (pages 312, 314, 323).  Previous to this, in 1696, there had been an enquiry as to whose duty it was to pay a small bill of 17s. 10d., for the Court “could not be fully satisfied that the said Ickford Bridge was at any time repaired 

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at the County Charge,” and the Clerk of the Peace was ordered to “search the Books of Orders about the year 1685.”  Presumably he did so, and found the entry which appears on page 183 of Volume I of the Bucks.  Sessions Records, for the bill was paid at the next Session (pages 104, 112).

In the case of High Bridge, part of which was in Denham and part in Uxbridge, co. Middlesex, the Clerk of the Peace was again ordered, in 1700, to look up the records, and he reported that he had found orders in 1670 and 1671 which indicated that the part of the bridge within the County was a County bridge.  The Justices agreed and £5. 5s. 5d. was paid for repairs (page 235, 249, 254).  The Clerk need not have looked so far back, for at Midsummer, 1685, the bridge was twice described as a County bridge (see Volume I, pages 181, 188).  After a further £4 had been spent upon repairs in 1702, it was reported that the bridge was “soe ruinous and in such decay that it will fall downe . . . if not tymely prevented,” and, after a discussion as to whether it should be rebuilt or further repaired, it was eventually rebuilt in 1704 for £50 (pages 350, 381, 419, 429).

The Clerk of the Peace referred to above was Thomas Smith, who was appointed in place of Francis Neale when Thomas Wharton became custos rotulorum in 1689.  Wharton was the author of the famous song “Lillibullero,” which is reputed to have been instrumental in causing the downfall of James II, and after the Revolution he rose to great importance, and was one of the Whig Junta, which dominated English politics until the Parliament of 1701 produced a Tory majority.  His influence waned still more after the accession of Queen Anne, in 1702, when he was dismissed from all his posts.  In that year William, Lord Cheyne and Viscount Newhaven, was appointed custos rotulorum, and he at once dismissed Thomas Smith, Wharton’s nominee and restored Francis Neale to the office of Clerk of the Peace (page 330).  Cheyne and Wharton had for long been personal and political antagonists, and had even fought a duel in July, 1699.

At Epiphany, 1702-03, Smith produced a writ of mandamus, commanding the Justices to restore him to his office, his argument being that, in accordance with the pro- visions of 1 William and Mary, stat. 1, c. 21, his appointment 

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was “for his life.”  This point was only partially a sound one, for the act of 1 William and Mary provided that a Clerk of the Peace was to remain in office “for so long time only as . . . [he] shall well demean himself,” and the procedure of removal demanded that “a complaint and charge in writing” should be “exhibited against him to the justices of the peace . . . openly in their general quarter sessions.” This act repealed the provisions of 37 Henry VIII, c. 1, which laid down that a Clerk of the Peace should “hold and enjoy the office during the time that the said custos rotulorum shall occupy and exercise the aforesaid office of custos rotulorum.”  So, although Smith was claiming that his appointment was for life, he actually could have been removed upon complaint to the Justices.  No complaint having been lodged, the Court would have been in a difficulty in refusing to answer the writ if they had not, it appears, have known that there was some irregularity in his appointment.  For it is recorded that “Mr. Smith being desired by the Court to shew and produce his Grant of the said Office, he refused soe to doe, declareing that he had beene advised to the Contrary,” and he refused again when he once more produced his writ at the next Session (pages 359-361, 378).  There the matter ended, and it is of interest in showing how completely Wharton’s influence must have declined if he was not able to do anything in support of his protégé.

In connection with the Clerk of the Peace, two items may be noted, namely, the payment of 9s. 6d. “for a large Paper Booke prepared for to enter the Process and Orders of this Court” (page 22), and the payment of £4, in 1695, “for the statutes made in Parliament since his present Majesties reign which hee hath provided for the use of this Court” (page 56).  In the same year he was ordered to take over, on behalf of the County, the prosecution of an overseer, who had refused to pay an allowance ordered by the Court, and had taken the case to the King’s Bench by writ of certiorari in order to “weary and discourage” the un- fortunate woman concerned (page 65).  In 1702, Francis Neale was made “Receiver General,” or County Treasurer, in addition to his duties as Clerk of the Peace; the office had been temporarily abolished in 1688 (page 353).

The position of gaoler was also one of importance in these days.  The post was occupied at the start of the 

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period by William Benson, who had been appointed in 1684.  He continued to act until 1700, when Francis Wood- cock appears, although neither the dismissal of the former nor the appointment of the latter is given.  It is probable that Benson resigned, for he seems to have remained on good terms with the Court, and his house was still used as the County Gaol.  The question of the payment of rent for this house occurs frequently throughout the Calendar.  In Epiphany 1694-95, he made his first application for “some allowance or yearly Pension,” and later asked to be given the annual grant of £20, which had been allowed to his predecessor, Nathaniel Birch, but “had been discontinued sixteen years ago.”  A petition was addressed to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Charles Montagu, (later the first Earl of Halifax) and, through the intervention of Thomas Wharton, the grant was allowed (pages 32, 57, 75).  It was, however, only continued for two years, and another petition had to be sent to the Chancellor, who was then John Smith (page 216).  After this Francis Woodcock became gaoler, and Benson’s rent was paid regularly, although generally in arrears, by the Justices (pages 259, 268, 305, 315, etc.).

It is evident that the post was no sinecure.  In 1695, Benson complained of the damage done by “severall rude and disorderly persons now and lately in his Custody,” and he was allowed £6. 5s. for repairs (page 32 ); in 1699, he was paid £10 for “his extraordinary charge to watchmen” in consequence of “very great Disorders of the Prisoners in his Custody” (pages 194, 205).  Woodcock was allowed £9. 6s. a year later for his “extraordinary charges” in having to keep a “constant watch” for the previous three months (page 248).  This worry possibly explains why Woodcock was convicted of swearing one oath in 1703 and four oaths in 1704 (pages 387, 403).  The prisoners can have enjoyed themselves little more, and one man appears to have taken his punishment so much to heart that the gaoler was ordered to “see him att Least six Miles from Aylesbury . . . before he receive his Liberty,” with the idea of “preventing any revenge he may exercise in the Town of Aylesbury for his Confinement” (page 297).

The conditions in the County Gaol were probably neither better nor worse than those prevailing in the gaols of other counties at this date.  But they were bad enough to 

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make the present day reader surprised that little or nothing was done to improve the gaol, if only in the interests of the inhabitants of the County.  In 1698 and 1699, the “con- tagious distemper,” or gaol fever, was responsible for the death of thirteen prisoners (pages 171, 179, 194, 215), and the apothecary to the gaol twice refers to this epidemic (pages 195, 339).  In 1704, over thirty of the prisoners suffered from the small-pox; the gaoler was paid £11, and the apothecary £25, for attending them (pages 421, 429, 440, 448).  This outbreak became so severe that the fines of absent jurors were remitted “in regard the Towne of Aylesbury is much visitted with the small pox” (page 440).

Up to 1700, about £40 was spent upon repairs for strengthening the gaol (pages 32, 66, 94, 113, 235).  In that year the Grand Jury, at the Midsummer Assizes, made a presentment that “the Common Goal in Aylesbury was the freehold inheritance of Mr. Benson, and that the same is too weak and not large enough.”  A scheme for rebuilding had been proposed in 1682 (see Volume I, pages 112, 141), but nothing had come of it.  The Grand Jury were probably urged to make another effort by hearing reports of the epidemic of gaol fever, referred to above, and also by the fact that the Grand Jury in the neighbouring county of Hertford had put in a similar presentment at the Hertford Assizes. The Court considered the matter, and decided to appoint a Committee of Justices to deal with the question (pages 266-267).  At Epiphany, 1700-01, the Committee presented their report, which stated that they had come to the following conclusions: “(1) that the cost of altering the present gaol would be £200, (2) the cost of rebuilding the gaol on the present site would be £500, (3) the cost of altering the King’s Head at Aylesbury, or any other such house, would be £400, and (4) the cost of building a new gaol on an acre of ground more or less where there is no building now erected would be £2,000.”  The Committee had treated with the owners of several vacant sites and were going into the question of the cost of building a new gaol “according to the Moddell of Warwick Goale . . . or Northampton Goale.” As they had not been able to complete their report, they asked for further time, which was granted (page 274-275).  And here, except for further requests for more time, the matter again ended.  At Easter, 1703, Mr. Francis Ligoe, one of 

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the Committee, was asked to return “severall Modells, Surveys, Estimates, and other writings which have beene . . . made in order to Erect and Build a New County Goale,” so that they could be filed with the records of the Court and “be made use of as this Court shall from tyme to tyme direct” (pages 288, 296, 304, 315, 382).

The following examples of the fees payable to the gaoler by the prisoners are worth noting.  At Midsummer 1697, Benson received £1. 9s. 4d. “for the Clerk of the Assizes and his own fees due on the widdow Quaint, a prisoner in his Goal upon her discharge” (page 133), and at the next Session 15s. was paid out of the County funds to obtain the discharge of Henry Smith, who had been “acquitted upon his tryall at the last Assizes and was remaining in Custody for his Fees onely” (page 143); in 1699, £1. 7s. 8d. each was paid for the discharge of four persons (page 194).  In the same year, £6 was paid to obtain the release of a debtor, Edward Marshall, an excise officer, in order that he might be able to support his wife and family, which he was “by his Education enabled to do” (page 225).

The allowance to prisoners, which had been raised from 1½d. to 3d. a day at Epiphany 1693-94 (see Volume I, page 492), was reduced at Easter 1695 to 2d. (page 45), but again increased to 3d. at the next Epiphany Session “by reason of the dearness of Corne” (page 74).  Many prisoners applied for the allowance, “setting out that their whole subsistence depended intirely upon the said allowance of bread and that the price of wheat still continued very high” (pages 86, 105). The allowance was reduced to 2½d. at Midsummer, 1700, in view of the fact that “the Price of Corne is of late much abated” (page 259), and was further reduced to 2d. at the next Session (page 268).  Poor debtors were admitted to the same allowance if they applied for it, as many did (pages 113, 126, 133, 143, etc., see index).  An allowance of 9d. a day was made for the family of Jaques Falon “a Foreighner travelling . . . through this County in Order to Embarque for Ireland;” he had been committed to gaol for dangerously wounding a man, and his wife and family were forced to accompany him there as, “being Strangers, they cannot be legally settled in this Kingdom” (page 156).

In 1699, as it appeared that there had been irregularities in the accounts of the baker who supplied the gaol with 

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bread, it was ordered that a proper record of prisoners and their allowances, and accurate accounts, should be kept and be submitted to one of the Justices to be audited (page 206). Mary Pratt, senior, of Aylesbury, was the first baker to submit an account (page 224), and in 1700 she, Mary Pratt, junior, and William Chandler, were officially appointed as bakers to the gaol (page 259).  The amount of the quarterly account for bread no doubt varied according to the number of prisoners in the gaol.  It was as high as £23. 11s. 8d., at Epiphany, 1701-02, and as low as £9. 14s. 10d. at Michaelmas, 1703 (pages 315, 397), but averaged at about £16, being higher for the first half of the period.  There were various changes made in the bakers, and in 1702 William Chandler was dismissed upon the complaint of the prisoners that he had “abused them both in the Weight and Bakeing of the County Bread” (pages 326, 350, 448).

Several debtors were released under the various acts— 22 and 23 Charles II, c. 20, 30 Charles II, stat.  1, c. 7, 7 and 8 William III, c. 12, etc.  In 1696, four debtors were released after they had been six months in gaol (page 95).  One was released in 1703, and one failed to secure his liberty, as his debt was still over £20 (page 382).  We have already noted that four debtors were released upon their “voluntary enlistment”; two others failed for want of notice (page 365), and two applied, but did not appear (page 433). Richard Harrison, who was arrested for deserting his family, pleaded that “he was much in debt and absconded from his Creditors, being in fear of an Arrest, and therefore was not within the Intent of the Statutes” (page 211), and the Court ordered the discharge of Thomas Weedon, who was arrested for debt when he came to give evidence in another case (page 224).

Not so much is told of the three bridewells, at Aylesbury, High Wycombe and Newport Pagnell.  The salaries of the keepers was £30, paid quarterly, and, in 1696, they were ordered to produce at each Session “a true Calendar in writeing of all such persons as are then actually Prisoners in their respective custodies, with the Causes of the respective Committments of such Prisoners” (page 102).  None of these appears in the Sessions Books, but some are preserved amongst the Sessions Rolls, the first appearing at Easter, 1701 (page 290).  In 1700, it was discovered, by means of 

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these Calendars, that “felons and persons suspected of felony” were being, “through some Inadvertencies,” com- mitted to the bridewells instead of to the gaol, and it was ordered that this practice should cease (page 265).

Michael Read, who had been appointed on the removal of Henry Munday in 1692 (see Volume I, page 423), was the keeper at Aylesbury until his death in 1696, when Henry Munday was re-appointed.  Munday, as we have noted above, had been in trouble shortly before for “drinking King James his health” (page 13), and it may have been on account of his past that a curious condition was made in his appoint- ment, by which he was made to pay £10 of his salary to John Christmas, another claimant for the office.  Christmas had “in his station been very usefull and serviceable to this present Government . . . and with some misfortunes in his family and dealings in the world is become very much in debt,” and the grant was made by the Court, at Munday’s expense, “an an Incouragement to others to be industrious for the support thereof” (page 83); the condition was continued until 1702 (page 338).  Michael Read’s widow was paid £2. 10s. for acting in place of her husband until a successor was appointed, and for allowing “her house in Aylesbury and her goods to be made use of for the confine- ment and Chastisement of Prisoners” (page 96).

John Rose remained as the keeper at High Wycombe throughout the period; he had been appointed in 1692 (see Volume I, page 447).  Matthew Annesley, who became keeper at Newport Pagnell in 1683 (see Volume I, page 128), was indicted in 1701 for allowing a prisoner to escape, but no result of the case is given (page 296); in 1694 four soldiers had escaped from his bridewell, doing damage to the extent of £2. 10s. (page 12).  He died in 1704, and John Johnson succeeded him (pages 428, 432).

There is no great change during this period in the nature of the offences recorded.  Again we find mostly assault, petty larceny, neglect of duty by the constables, and disorderly and unlicensed alehouses, making up the bulk of the indictments.  It is somewhat disappointing that there are considerably fewer punishments recorded, but such as appear have been put into the Schedule at the end of this preface.

There is a marked decline in the number of indictments

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for recusancy and for absence from church, and religious toleration would appear to have applied to Roman Catholics and Dissenters alike.  The number of recusants narrows down to a faithful dozen or so, who appear so frequently that we have only continued the repetition of their occupations and residences for one year (See Note on page 71).  The two best known of the recusants were Sir Robert Throckmorton and Sir Edward Longville.  The only other offences which have any religious significance are the indictment of certain persons for assembling and disturbing the Rector of Water Stratford when he was preaching (page 387), and the indictment of several men for trading on Sunday (pages 139, 230, 239, 264, 395).

The Government, however, appeared to think that the country was peopled by extremely bad characters.  The royal proclamations “for preventing and punishing immorality and profaneness” were “openly and publicly read” at most sessions (pages 166, 236, 249, etc.), and one is given in full at Easter, 1698.  In it the King deplored the fact that, in spite of the ending of the war and “the Conclusion of an Honorable peace,” nevertheless “Impiety, Prophaness, and Immorality do still abound in this Kingdom to the high displeasure of Almighty God, the great Scandal of Christianity, and the ill and fatall Example of persons who have been soberly educated.”  All the constables and other officers were “strictly charged” to enforce the laws for the suppression of vice and immorality (page 169).  In 1702, the Court ordered all officers of the County and all “whoe have any sense either of the honour of God or of the Good of their Country” to do their utmost to prevent “the great prophanation of the Lord’s day, the too Common practice of Cursing and Swearing, Excess of Drinking, and the Impudent committing of Lewdness and Debauchery, which they are convinced have of Late increased.”  A list of offences, and the punishments provided by the statutes, was appended to this order (pages 350-352).

A non-sectarian body, known as the Society for the Reformation of Manners, which was formed in 1692, is said to have been largely responsible for this puritanical movement, and certainly it was through their efforts that the act of 6 and 7 William III, c. 11, was passed, which attempted to suppress “prophane curseing and swearing.”  The first 

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PREFACE xxxi

conviction under this act appears at Midsummer, 1695 (page 58), and the fine was usually 2s. for each oath.  Very many persons were convicted, and it has been said that the effect in the country was such that “no one but a person of quality could safely swear in a public place.”  But persons of quality were not always immune in Buckinghamshire, for several “gentlemen” were fined, and even one of the Justices, Charles Palmer, was convicted in 1704 (page 426).

Amongst specific offences, the following may be noted Thomas Read, who kept a Coffee House at Aylesbury, was brought before the Court in 1702 for having “in his Custody severall dangerous Pamphletts exposed to reading”; he was reprimanded, with a caution not “to take in any scandalous Pamphletts for the future,” and the pamphlets were “publickly burnt in the open Market” (page 324). Anthony Davys was indicted “for scandalous words of the Lord Leiutenant,” and the case was removed to the King’s Bench (page 358).  William Robinson was acquitted on a charge of influencing a jury by gaining admittance to the room in which they were empanelled, and the bailiff of the Court was fined £2 for allowing him to do so (pages 134, 138, 150).  Another bailiff was fined 6s. 8d. for failing to warn a juryman (page 337).  An innkeeper was fined 3s. 4d. “for refuseing to Lodge a Traveller whoe fell sick on the Roade and dyed” (pages 396, 404), and William Church was acquitted on a charge of keeping a disorderly alehouse “to which persons resorted, even upon fast days, to drink and play ninepins” (page 99).  The Court made efforts to prevent the use of illegal measures in shops and markets (pages 239, 240, 252, 257, 267, 428, 438), and to see that the “hue and cry” (pages 396, 403) and the watch (pages 4, 50, 62, 70, 100, etc.) were not neglected.  Persons were indicted for stealing horse-hair (page 129), not repairing a pound (pages 130, 139), “inticeing away” a wife (page 445), having a dangerous chimney (page 129), selling unwholesome meat (page 78), being a “common scold” (page 151), forestalling and engrossing (pages 3, 138, 252, etc.), incontinency (pages 118, 245, 390), and for “night walking” (pages 138, 239).

There are references to highway robbery when John Edgson was paid £2 for being “instrumentall in the apprehending of Highwaymen,” in which service he had “hazarded his life . . . and ought to have had the reward which is 

___________________________________

 

 

xxxii PREFACE

by law bestowed in that case, but by some indirect meanes the Highwaymen were acquitted” (page 44), and when Ralph French was given £1 for similar services (page 248).

The Lords of the Manor of Swanbourne were presented for not appointing a constable, but it was decided that the case was “not presentable” (pages 28, 31).  The omission to hold “Court Leets” was brought to the notice of the Justices by the mayor and recorder of High Wycombe, who stated that the result was that “the Extents of the respective libertyes is grown doubtfull and the Constables less vigilant.” The Court ordered that constables should at once be appointed and that they should endeavour “to revive the Exact Jurisdictions of the severale Leets” (pages 230-231).  Certain persons complained, in 1704, that they had been nominated at a petty session to serve as petty constables, which pro- cedure they considered “to be Impracticable and injurious to the Lords of Manors whoe kept Leetes and contrary to the express words of the Statute.”  The opinion of the Court was that nobody could be appointed as constable “otherwise then in a Court Leetes or by the Order of this Court for defect of holding Court Leete” (page 418).  A merciful constable was fined 13s. 4d. for refusing to whip a woman who had been convicted of “pulling of hedges” (page 13).

In 1696, there were serious complaints against the chief constables.  It was said that they “executed their said Offices by Deputies, who for their own unjust lucre have imposed on the petty Constables . . . have presumed to represent their respective principles when called to their presentments and . . . have also presumed to deliver in such presentments upon their own Oaths.”  They had also made the petty constables travel to “some public place”  to give in their presentments and quarterly money, “which required an unnecessary Expence.”  It was ordered that the chief constables should not be absent from the Sessions without leave, and that the petty constables should be allowed to bring their presentments to the private houses of the chief constables (pages 103-104).

Other items of interest are diversions of the highway at Chalfont St. Peter and Burnham (pages 245, 313), a number of recognizances to keep alehouses in 1702 (pages 340-341), and references to the stocks at Aylesbury (page 

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PREFACE xxxiii

205), and to the Grammar School at High Wycombe (page 299).  It is instructive to read the orders made under the act “to prevent Exactions of the Occupyers of Locks and Weares upon the River of Thames Westward and for ascerteyning the Rates of Water Carriages upon the said River” (6 and 7 William III, c. 16), by which, amongst other things, the charge for Hambleden Lock was fixed at 3s. 6d. and that for Marlow Lock at 3s. (pages 51-54).  The fixing of the “flash marks” on the locks led to an unedifying quarrel amongst the Justices to whom this task was delegated (pages 57-58).

The names of many well-known men of the day, other than those already mentioned, appear in the Calendar, but we will not further prolong this preface by giving a list of them, as they may be found by referring to the index.

As in Volume I, the spelling of place names and of surnames is given in the Calendar exactly as they appear in the original records; Christian names have been given their modern spelling.  In the index, place names have been spelt according to the forms given in the index to the Victoria County History for Buckinghamshire, and surnames have been grouped under their modern, or their most frequent, spelling.

In conclusion, we would like to record our appreciation of the interest taken in this work by the members of the Standing Joint Committee, and of the advice and assistance rendered by the Clerk of the Peace.

William Le Hardy

Geoffrey Ll. Reckitt

2, Stone Buildings,

Lincoln’s Inn, W.C.2.

February, 1936.

SCHEDULE OF OFFENCES AND PUNISHMENTS TAKEN FROM THE SESSIONS RECORDS, 1694-1705

 

OFFENCE

PUNISHMENT

PAGE

 

Alehouses, Keeping disorderly

Fined

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

403.

 

3s. 4d.

and

 

2.

Suppressed . .

Keeping unlicensed

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

394.

£1.

. .

. .

91, 99, 358.

Refusing to lodge

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

404.

travellers

. .

Apprentices, Refusing to employ

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

23.

 

Assaultt

. .

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

2, 16, 17, 48, 61, 129, 161, 181, 218, 219, 263, 310, 347, 359, 388, 404, 427, 437.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

5s.

. .

. .

27.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

6s. 8d.

. .

. .

129, 182, 335, 387.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

10s.

. .

. .

445.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

13s. 4d.

. .

16, 181, 182, 198, 228, 263, 293.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

£1.

. .

. .

129, 263, 347, 388, 427.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

£3. 6s. 8d.

. .

347.

 

. .

. .

. .

. .

£5.

. .

. .

2, 110.

 

Burglary, Abetting a

. .

. .

Committed to bridewell

245.

 

Changing corn

. .

. .

. .

Fined

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

13.

 

Constables, Neglect of duty by

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

2, 61.

 

” ” ” ”

13s. 4d.

. .

358.

Refusing to assist

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

137, 218.

Refusing to assist

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

. .

13s. 4d.

. .

219.

Refusing to be sworn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

as

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

2, 62.

to whip a prisoner

13s. 4d.

13.

Warrant not exe-

£1. 13s. 4d.

. .

129.

cuted by

. .

Court, Absence from, by bailiff

Fined

£1. 6s. 8d.

. .

14, 34, 217.

 

” ” ” ”

jurors

£1. 10s.

. .

46, 59, 68, 76, 88, 97, etc. (See index.)

 

Desertion of family

. .

. .

Committed to bridewell

168, 191.

 

” ” ”

. .

. .

 ” ”

gaol

. .

211, 353.

 

Enclosure

. .

. .

. .

Fined

13s. 4d.

. .

62.

 

Escape, Allowing an

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

13, 27, 229.

 

Forcible entry

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

17.

 

. .

. .

. .

6s. 8d.

. .

. .

17.

Fraud

. .

. .

. .

. .

£2. 2s.

 

. .

238.

 

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SCHEDULE OF OFFENCES AND PUNISHMENTS XXXV

 

Offence

Punishment

Page

Highway, Non-repair of the

. .

Fined

£5.

. .

. .

3.

Refusing to work on

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

3s.

. .

. .

318.

Refusing to work on

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

6s.

. .

. .

318.

Refusing to work on

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

10s.

. .

. .

318.

Refusing to work on

 

 

 

 

 

 

the

. .

. .

£3.

. .

. .

16.

Incontinency

. .

. .

. .

Committed to bridewell

245.

Inmates, Taking in

. .

. .

Fined

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

209.

. .

. .

10s.

. .

. .

229.

Juryman, Not warning a

. .

6s. 8d.

. .

. .

337.

Larceny . .

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

2, 36, 161.

. .

. .

. .

. .

5s.

. .

. .

272.

. .

. .

. .

. .

13s. 4d.

. .

161, 263.

. .

. .

. .

. .

£1.

. .

. .

263.

. .

. .

. .

. .

Whipped in gaol

. .

3, 91, 310.

. .

. .

. .

. .

Publicly whipped

. .

138, 161, 181, 189, 190, 228, 229, 263, 293, 301, 309, 310, 404.

Night walking

. .

. .

. .

Fined

6s. 8d.

. .

. .

138.

. .

. .

. .

£1.

. .

. .

138.

Nuisance and obstruction

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

91, 190, 318.

Oath of allegiance, Refusing to

 

 

 

 

 

take the

. .

. .

£2.

. .

. .

82.

Peace, Breach of the

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

17, 252.

. .

. .

6s. 8d.

. .

. .

129.

Poaching

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

 

. .

219.

. .

. .

. .

13s. 4d.

. .

209.

Pound breach

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

138, 359.

Rioting

. .

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

138.

Sunday, Trading on a

. .

. .

5s.

. .

. .

239.

Swearing

. .

. .

. .

Usually 2s. fine for each oath, and double fine for a second offence . .

See index

Trespass

. .

. .

. .

Fined

6d.

. .

. .

347.

. .

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

310.

. .

. .

. .

13s. 4d.

. .

273.

. .

. .

. .

£1. 6s. 8d.

. .

263.

Vagrants, Taking in

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

208.

 ”

. .

. .

10s.

. .

. .

78.

Watch, Refusing to

. .

. .

3s. 4d.

. .

. .

62, 70, 394.

Work, Refusing to

. .

. .

Committed to bridewell

184, 424.

 

 

 

Buckinghamshire Sessions Records

QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4.

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION AT WENDOVER

12th July, 1694 [6 William and Mary]

p.  I.  Jurors for the body of the county.

John Stace and William Lyndsey, gentlemen, Joseph Smith, Richard Brigginshaw, James Kipping, Thomas Reynolds, William West, Thomas Yates, Gustave Horne and Matthew Huntley, gentlemen, William West, Henry Chilton, Robert Bawdrey, William Cock, John Tompkins, Henry Grace, Richard Parratt junior, John Smith, and Henry Goodman.

(signed) Johnshall Crosse, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the case against James Gould of Braddenham.

John Kipping, Samuel Veary, William Collett, Edward Munday, James Smith, Philip Redding, John Strong, Robert Redding, Joseph Welles senior, Michael Welles, William Fenner, and Thomas Dover.

(signed) Johnshall Crosse, esquire, sheriff.

Memorandum that the houses of John Fuller and Francis George, both of Thornborough, have been registered as meeting houses for Dissenters under the act of 1 William and Mary [c. 18.].

___________________________________

 

QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

pp. 2-4. Indictments.

Richard Stevens of Chesham, cordwainer, for negligently discharging the office of constable.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Richard Deller of Bray, co. Berks, gentleman, and John Lee of Cookeham, co.  Berks, yeoman, for assaulting Mary, wife of William Burton.  [Deller fined £5; Lee not guilty.]

Silvester Lane of Dinton and Thomas Bigg of Fullmer, victuallers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

Daniel Browne and Thomas Beckett, constables of Iver, for allowing Thomas Rawson to escape.  [Adjourned.]

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury, labourer, John House, gentleman, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, all of Beerton, John Temple of Stoke Mandivile, gentleman, and [Ann], his wife, Agnes Jolly senior of Wendover, Sir Edward Longfeeld, Bt., of Woolverton, John Mabee, labourer, and [Ann], his wife, Alice Jones, Frances Carter, and Mary Goodman, widows, and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Waters, all of Muresley, [blank] Mosdell of Fullmer, widow, and Catherine, wife of Thomas Smith of Upton, for recusancy and absence from church.

John Norris of Edgecott, victualler, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.  [Fined 3s. 4d. and alehouse suppressed, see pp. 87 and 101-2.]

The inhabitants of Sherrington for not walling or railing Sherrington Bridge.

Peter Collingridge, farmer, and Mary English, widow, both of Guyhurst, for absence from church.

Raphael Roase, cordwainer, Francis Hensman, tailor, and Edmund Martin, tallow-chandler, all of Olney, for stealing three hens, value 11d., from Joseph Foskett.  [All fined 3s. 4d.]

Thomas Curle of Swanborne, farmer, for refusing to be sworn as constable of Swanborne in place of William Deverill. [Fined 3s. 4d., and sworn as constable.]

John Wheatly of Newport Pagnell, cooper, for stealing a cock from John Johnson.

Roger Ewer junior of Chalfont St. Giles, labourer, for assaulting Richard Wilbee.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

John Rogers, carpenter, constable of Chalfont St. Giles, 

2

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

for not executing a justice’s warrant for the arrest of Roger Ewer.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

John Wheeler of Aylesbury, labourer, for stealing 11d. in money from William Brookes.  [To be whipped; and see pp. 14 and 17.]

Thomas Borne of Bledlow, victualler, for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

Sir Thomas Cobb, Bt., of Atterbury, co. Oxford, and the inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesdon, for not scouring the ditches at a place called Westcott Gapp on the road to Winslow. [Cobb discharged on certificate, Epiph. 1694-95.]

Richard Saunders of Princes Risborough, yeoman, for not repairing part of the highway from Haddenham to Chepping Wycombe at a place called North Piece, near Horsingdon.  [Found not guilty.]

William Blackwell of Great Kimble, gentleman, and Francis and John Goodchild, both of Princes Risborough, yeomen, for not repairing part of the road from Haddenham to Chepping Wycombe at a place called Horsingdon Pasture. [Blackwell found not guilty; the others fined £5; and see p. 148.]

 

p. 5. Presentments of the grand jury.

Samuel Very, flax-dresser, surveyor of the highways at Wendover, for laying the stones and gravel intended for the highways against his own house.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

William Edge, Jeremiah Sprigins, and Joseph Gate, all of Chesham, for “forestalling and engrossing.”  [Gate pardoned, see p. 171.]

Joseph Glover of Emerton, victualler, for being a common swearer and a drunkard.

 

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Borne of Bledlow and James Wild of Iver, victuallers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury for recusancy and absence from church.

John Howse, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, all 

3

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

of Broughton in Beerton, John Temple of Stoke Mandivill, and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longfeeale of Woolverton, and “Madam” Mosdell of Fulmer, for being popish recusants.

Thomas Winter, constable of Brandsfee, for not bring- ing in his presentments to John Hill, chief constable.

Peter Collingridge, farmer, and Mary English, widow, both of Guyhurst, for absence from church.

The constables of Westbury for not paying in their King’s Bench and Marshalsea money.

John Noare of Ivinghoe for refusing to pay his quarteridge money to the constables.

John Pointer of Denham for refusing to watch.

 

p. 6. Petty constables sworn.

 

East Burnham . . John Styles vice John Pond.

Burnham . . . . Robert Aldridge vice Richard Rider.

Calverton . . . . William Booton and Thomas Watkins vice Richard Garlick and Thomas Esson.

Wavendon . . . . James Allen vice William Gregory.

Adstock . . . . Thomas Hogg vice Gabriel Medley.

Dinton . . . . Richard Smalbrooke vice William Adkins.

Chepping Wycombe Christopher Parsons vice William

Forrens Saunders

Brill . . . . Edward Adkyns vice William Pilkington.

Ludgarshall . . Leonard Wallington vice William North.

Amersham Wood- Christopher Shrimpton vice James

side Worrill.

Nether Winchendon John Betham vice Samuel Bonner.

Aylesbury . . . . Alexander North and John Welch vice John Wigson and Thomas Brookes.

Loughton . . . . Withers Nicholls vice John Furnace.

Sinckleborough . . William Hartwell vice John Jeffes

Aston Abbotts . . Thomas Millmer and William Woodward vice John Milemer and George Hobbs.

Cuddington . . John Norris vice William Beale.

 

4

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

Orders.

p. 7.  Orders extending the recognizances of Thomas Alexander of Chalfont St. Peters, victualler, and William Walter of Ilmer, yeoman, and estreating the recognizances of Tobias Churchill of Steeple Claydon, gentleman, Peregrine Ford of Cuddington, yeoman, and John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher, on account of their non- appearance.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Kensworth against a warrant removing Daniel Flexmore and his wife from Chesham.

 

Order, with consent of the parties, for the removal of Thomas Humfrys and his family from Upper Winchingdon to Chersley.

 

p. 8.  Order allowing the appeal of Chesham against an order of court for the payment of 1s. a week to Francis Martin. His daughter is at present maintained by the parish, and it is ordered that she shall return to him and that the overseers shall pay Martin 4s. for her maintenance, until the court makes a further order.

 

p. 9.  Order dismissing the appeal of Little Missenden against a warrant removing Richard Myles junior from Amersham.

 

pp. 10-13.  The following are discharged from the indict- ments against them, upon producing justices’ certificates that the necessary repairs have now been effected:

Walton, in respect of part of the highway from Newport Pagnell to Leyghton Bussard, co. Bedford.

Bow Brickhill, in respect of part of the highway from Fenny Stratford to Wooborne, co. Bedford.

Adstock, in respect of a water course called Hamm Gutter, which lies in Home Mead near the highway from Winslow to Buckingham.

Radcliffe, in respect of part of the highway to Torcester, co. Northampton.

 

5

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Tingewick, in respect of Broadrideing Lane, which is part of the highway to Bisceter, co. Oxford, and in respect of Wood Lane, which leads to the common.

Thomas Edgerly, esquire, and Mary Pledwell, widow, in respect of parts of the highway leading to Bisceter, co. Oxford, in Water Stratford and Tingewick, at a place called Pingesford.

Stow, in respect of part of the highway from Dadford to Buckingham.

Chackmore, in respect of a ditch near the highway from Shalston to Buckingham.

Alexander Denton of Cowley in Preston, esquire, in respect of Cowley Lane, which leads to Buckingham.

 

p. 14.  Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Burnham the appeal of Richard Wilbee, farmer, of the Rectory at Chalfont St. Giles, against his rates.

 

William Powell, committed for refusing to find sureties, to be discharged from gaol.

 

John Wheeler to be whipped in the gaol by [William] Benson, the gaoler, for stealing money from William Brookes.

 

p. 15.  Aston Rowant, co. Oxford, appealed against a warrant removing Richard Tripp, with his wife and four children, from Bledlow, where, they alleged, he was a copy- holder in respect of a cottage which his brother, John, had surrendered to him two years ago.  The overseers of Bledlow stated that Tripp had since mortgaged, or conditionally surrendered, the cottage to Ann Clarke, widow, the lady of the manor of Bledlow, whose main estate is in Aston Rowant. It was agreed between the parties to state a case and to submit it to the decision of Sir John Holt, Knt., Lord Chief Justice.  [See pp. 88, 118, and 164.]

 

p. 16.  Order again referring the dispute between Woofton and Loughton, concerning the conveyance of cripples, to the justices for the hundred of Newport.  [See p. 120.]

 

6

___________________________________

 

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

Order for the discharge of John Eason of Wing, grazier, from his recognizance of £50 for the appearance of his son, John, to answer a bastardy order in respect of the child of Elizabeth Bowd.  Christopher Healy, churchwarden, and William Prentice and Richard King, overseers, certified that Eason had now indemnified the parish of Wing.

 

p. 17.  The money found in the pocket of John Wheeler on his arrest for larceny was given back in court to William Brookes of Aylesbury, yeoman, from whom it was stolen. [And see p. 14.]

 

William, son of Thomas Walter of Ilmer, gentleman, committed to gaol for refusing to find sufficient security to indemnify the parish in respect of the bastard child of Mary Levinz.

 

p. 18.  A dispute having arisen between the inhabitants of Wingrave and the inhabitants of Rowsham, a village in that parish, as to the liability of Rowsham to assist in the repair of the highways of the parish, and as “great heates and animosityes have increased in the said parish,” the parties “now resorted to this Court to quiet and settle the same.” The order of the Court was that in future three surveyors should be elected annually, two from Wingrave and one from Rowsham, who should perform all work in connection with all the highways of the parish jointly in every respect.

 

p. 19.  Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land in Horsendon in respect of an indictment against the parish for non-repair of highways.

 

Charles Howard (Heyward) of Aylesbury, baker, given further time in which to pay to his late apprentice, Richard Dover, the £4 which the Court ordered him to hand over when the apprenticeship was discharged at the last session.

 

The inhabitants of Little Kimble are ordered to pay

 

7

___________________________________

 

 

QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Daniel Butler such an amount for the expenses incurred by him in connection with the birth of the bastard child of Jane Littlepage and Richard Statham as certain justices shall direct.  [See p. 89.]

 

p. 20.  John Williamson and John Phipps, surveyors of Newport Pagnell, authorized to raise a 4d. rate for the repair of the highways there, in accordance with the act of 3 and 4 William and Mary [c. 12].

 

Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land in Weston Turvile in respect of an indictment against the parish for non-repair of highways.

 

p. 21.  The surveyors of Weston Turvile authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of the highways there, in accordance with the act.

 

Further proceedings to be taken against John Pelzer, gentleman, and Thomas English, alias English Tom, labourer, both of Wooborne.  [See pp. 74-75.]

 

p. 22.  Order allowing the appeal of Chesham against a warrant removing [blank], widow of Thomas Moreton junior, and her family from Drayton Beauchampe.

 

Order adjourning the case against Mary Bethell of Wescott in Waddesdon, widow, for not repairing part of the road to Winslow called Westcott Gapp, on the under- standing that she will produce a justices’ certificate that the work has been done, and will also proceed with the indict- ment against Sir Thomas Cobb, Bt., and the inhabitants of Westcott for not scouring the ditches at the roadside.

 

p. 23.  Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury the appeal of the tenant of Welwick Farm against his assessment to rates in the parishes of Wendover, Stoke Mandivile, and Ellesborough.

 

Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

of land in Sherrington, Biddlesden, and Hillesdon, in respect of indictments against the parishes for non-repair of highways.

 

pp. 24-25.  William Oviatts and Richard Seaton, both of Barton Hartshorne, yeomen, discharged from the indict- ments against them for not repairing part of the highway from Buckingham to Bisciter, co. Oxford, at Round Hill, upon producing a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.

 

Mary Pledwell, widow, and Thomas Edgerley, esquire, similarly discharged in respect of parts of the highway leading to Bisceter, co. Oxford, in Water Stratford and Tingewick, at a place called Pingesford.

 

p. 26.  The inhabitants of Cheddington were ordered by certain justices to obtain the title deeds of the house in which Mary Pitkin, widow, now lives, in order that it might be decided whether she was legally settled in Cheddington or in Ivinghoe.  As the inhabitants of Cheddington “have slept upon the said Order.” it is now directed, at the request of Ivinghoe, that all former orders in this case shall be discharged.

 

Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land in Lillingston Dayrell, Akely, and Ilmer, in respect of indictments against the parishes for non-repair of highways.

 

Confirmation of a warrant removing Sarah Littleton and her child from Penn to Amersham.

 

p. 27.  Confirmation of a warrant removing Henry Hawes and his wife from Little Missenden to Penn.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Chalgrave, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Matthew Waters, with his wife and child, from Swanborne.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Confirmation of a warrant removing John Heyley from Amersham to Coleshill, co. Hertford.

 

p. 28.  Upon the report of certain justices for the three hundreds of Chilterne, the inhabitants of Stoke Poges are ordered to repay Lazarus Merry, late surveyor of the liberty of Ditton in Stoke Poges, £8. 11s. spent by him upon repairs to a bridge in Ashley Lane, on the road from Colebrooke to Windsor, co. Berks.  The repairs were undertaken on the orders of [Nicholas] Salter, esquire, J.P.

 

p. 29.  Adjournment of the appeal of Edgecott against a warrant removing Joan Cherry from Quainton.  [See p. 59].

 

p. 30.  Preston Bissett discharged from an indictment for not repairing part of the highway to Buckingham, upon producing a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.

 

Confirmation of a warrant removing Jane Page from [blank] to Little Kimble.

 

The surveyors of Little Kimble authorized to raise a 2d. rate for the repair of the highways there, in accordance with the act.

 

p. 31.  [Michael] Read, bridewell-keeper at Aylesbury, ordered to release Francis Welling, who was transferred from the bridewell at Chepping Wycombe, as no prosecutor has come forward.

 

Orders staying the proceedings against the following: Benjamin Stubble of Brill, indicted for keeping a dis- orderly alehouse; Margaret Bampton of Towersey, indicted for “continuing” a cottage; and George Hawes of Oakley, labourer, indicted for trading as a baker without due apprenticeship.

 

p. 32.  The overseers of Brill ordered to pay an allowance of 3s. a week to Elizabeth Ussill.

 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

The recognizances of the following are extended :

William Awd of Beauchampton, in respect of an indict- ment for not scouring two watercourses and a ditch.

Owners of land at Caversfield, Twiford, and Steeple Cleydon, in respect of indictments for non-repair of highways.

Catherine, Dowager Lady Wenman, of Twiford, in respect of an indictment for not repairing a footbridge.

William Chaloner, esquire, lord of the manor of Steeple Claydon, in respect of two indictments for not scouring certain watercourses.

Elizabeth Miller of Hillsden, widow, in respect of two indictments for non-repair of highways.

 

p. 33.  The overseers of Bierton ordered to pay an allowance of 2s. 6d. a week to Thomas Andrew.

 

p. 34.  Order discharging the presentment against the inhabitants of Rowsham.

 

Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his quarter's salary of £7. 10s. by John How, the treasurer for the “lower division” of the county.

 

Adjournment of the appeal against the rates at Stoke Hamond.

 

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £2. 10s. by Daniel Giles, one of the treasurers, for maintaining Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, who was born in the gaol.

 

p. 35.  “Whereas by an Act of this present Parliament, entituled ‘An Act for granting to their Majesties severall duties upon vellum parchment and paper for four yeares towards carrieing on a warr against France’” [5 and 6 Will : and Mary, c. 21], “it is required that severall processes and Copies shall be written upon paper to be stamp'd under a very great penalty on the persons who shall neglect the same, And there being some doubtfull Clauses in the said Act, of which there has not been any Resolution yett pub- lickly given, it is therefore Ordered by this Court that the 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

Copies of the severall Orders made at this present Quarter Sessions may be written upon stamp’d paper, the persons who take the benefitt of such Copies paying the Clerke of the Peace 6d. extraordinary for every Copie for the stamp’d paper whereupon the same Copie shall be soe written or bringing at their owne Charge stamp’d paper whereupon to write the same.  This Order to Continue untill there shall be some Resolutions farther to explaine the said Act of Parliament.”

Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid £2. 10s. by John How, one of the treasurers, for damage caused by “four Souldiers, who were Committed to his Custody by their Majesties Deputy Leiutenants of this County pursuant to directions in that behalf given to the said Deputy Leiutenants by the Lords of their Majesties most honorable Privy Counsell, [and] had broken his Prison for to make their Escape.”

Michael Read, bridewell-keeper at Aylesbury, to be paid 6s. 8d. by John Gibbons, one of the treasurers, for money spent upon clothes for Francis Wellin, a poor prisoner.

p. 36.  The overseers of Pittlesthorne ordered to pay an allowance of 3s. a week to Mary, wife of Thomas Barrett, whose husband has deserted her and her three children.

Order staying further proceedings against Edmund Barnes of Ivinghoe, victualler.

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycombe, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s. by John Gibbons, the treasurer for the “upper division” of the county.

p. 37. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Richard Stevens, Ralph Roase, Francis Hensman, Edmund Martin, and John Wheeler. [See pp. 2-4.]

Edward Spicer of Chepping Wycombe, papermaker, found not guilty of rioting and breaking “a pipe or trunk

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

or sluce” belonging to George Clewer.  (From the Easter session.)

James Gould of Braddenham found not guilty of steal- ing a bag of cooper’s tools and 18s. in money from Hester Cassall, widow.  (From the Easter session.)

Hugh Lydall, baker, late constable of Great Marlow, fined 3s. 4d. for allowing the escape of William Honnor, and 13s. 4d. for refusing to whip Frances, wife of Andrew Marlow, who had been convicted of “pulling of hedges.” (From the Epiphany session.)

Daniel Kingham of Chepping Wycombe, miller, fined 3s. 4d. for “receiveing from Thomas Stevens, gentleman, a Bushell of Wheat, price 8s. 6d., to grind for him and fraudulently exchangeing the same for Meal mixt with Barley.”  (From the Epiphany session.)

 

p. 38. Recognizances extended.

William Walter of Ilmer, yeoman, in £20, with Thomas Walter and Francis Neale, both of Ilmer, yeomen, as sureties in £10 each, to keep the peace towards William Bowden.

 

p. 39. Recognizances entered into.

William Brookes of Aylesbury, yeoman, in £20, with Thomas Brookes of the same, yeoman, as surety in £10, to appear and answer.

Henry Munday of Aylesbury, innholder, in £50, with Thomas Jourdan of Aylesbury, yeoman, and John Webb of Bedgrove, yeoman, as sureties in £25 each, to appear at the Assizes and answer the charge of George Baldwin “concern- ing his drinking King James his health.”

William Horwood of Aston Clinton, farmer, in £20, to appear in respect of the bastard child of Ann Brandon.

William Taylor of Soulbury, alias Sulbury, farmer, in £40, for the appearance of Mary, his wife, and Thomas and Mary, his children.

John Major, yeoman, in £40, to appear and answer on behalf of the inhabitants of Lillingstone Dayrell.

Thomas Curle, farmer, and Edward Beckley, yeoman,

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

both of Swanborne, Richard Deller of Bray, co. Berks, gentle- man, and John Lee of Cookeham, co. Berks, yeoman, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

pp. 40-41. Fines and issues.

John Perry of Guyhurst and Thomas Bowry of Newport Pagnell fined £1. 6s. 8d. each for being absent from juries.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 37.

Tobias Churchill of Steeple Cleydon, gentleman, and John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher, forfeit their recognizances of £10 each for non-appearance.  [Both entries deleted.]

Peregrine Ford of Cuddington, yeoman, forfeits his recognizance of £40 for non-appearance, and Alexander Duncombe of Aylesbury, his surety, forfeits £20.

 

p. 42. Recognizances discharged.

William Deane of Chepping Wycombe, farmer, Thomas Walter, gentleman, and Francis Neale, farmer, both of Ilmer, Richard Stevens, cordwainer, and Job Blake, clothier, both of Chesham, John Eason of Wing, grazier, Ralph Roase, cordwainer, Thomas Martin, draper, Francis Hensman, tailor, and Edmund Martin, tallow-chandler, all of Olney, Thomas Course senior, farmer, Thomas Course junior, mercer, and John Course, farmer, all of Sherrington, Richard Wilbee of Chalfont St. Giles, farmer, Philip Gower of Beconsfield, gentleman, Edward Spicer, paper-maker, and Richard Lansdale, farmer, both of Chepping Wycombe, Richard Deller of Bray, co. Berks, gentleman, John Lee of Shasbrooke, co. Berks, gentleman, John Winfield of Soulbury, labourer, Thomas Curle of Swanborne, yeoman, William Brookes and Robert Todd, yeomen, Henry Edmunds, baker, Henry Munday, innholder, John White, butcher, and Henry Dunmoll, sadler, all of Aylesbury, Richard Ingram of Little Kimble, labourer, John Bigg of Great Kimble, gentleman, Thomas Gibson of Little Kimble, yeoman, John Wiatt and Francis Ingleton, both of Halton, yeomen, William Horwood, farmer, Benjamin Barton, cordwainer, and Mary Cooke, widow, all of Aston Clynton, Joseph Foskett of Easton 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1694

 

Mauditt, co. Northampton, yeoman, Elizabeth Scott of Olney, spinster, and William Russell of Chepping Wycombe, paper-maker.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 43-44.  [Blank.]

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMBE

4th October, 1694 [6 William and Mary]

 

p. 45. Jurors for the body of the county.

John Aldridge, gentleman, Thomas Rose senior, Joseph Goodchild, William Harding, Thomas Stevens, John Bowden, Thomas Walter junior, Samuel Bampton, Thomas Norbury and John Mason, gentlemen, William Graves, William Baldwyn, gentleman, Edward Ingram, Richard Chandler, James Buckmaster, Timothy Harding, Thomas Garroway, John Payne, William Jackman, William Edwyn, and Richard Cooke.

(signed) Johnshall Crosse, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 46. Jurors for the following cases.

 

(1) Against the inhabitants of Lillingstone Dayrell.

(2) Against Mary, wife of William Taylor of Soulbury,Tho mas Taylor junior, yeoman, and Mary Taylor, spinster.

(3) Against Richard Deller of Bray, co. Berks, yeoman.

(4) Against John Lee of Cookeham, co. Berks, yeoman.

(5) Against Edward Beckley of Swanborne, yeoman.

For (1), (2), (3), and (5) . .  William Grace, Francis

Ingby, Jeremiah Sexton, George Stone, and William Turner.

For (1), (3), and (5) . . Samuel Blick.

For (1), (2), and (3) . . Thomas Snow.

For (2), (3), and (5) . . Thomas Butterfield, gentleman, Henry Franklyn, Henry Hoar, John Tripp, and Edward Wetherley.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

For (2), (4), and (5) . . John Goodchild.

For (1) and (4) . . . . Thomas Barrowby, Hugh Dorrell, Jonathan Hamond, and John Plomer.

For (1)  . . . . . . Robert Chessall.

For (4)  . . . . . . Daniel Anderson, Thomas Bristow, William Brookes, William Fryer, John Major, William Nash, and Richard Willison.

 

p. 47.  John Blacknall and Thomas Alford, both of Chepping Wycombe, gentlemen, took the oaths in I William and Mary, c. I, and subscribed the declaration against transubstantiation and that in 30 Charles II, stat. 2, c. I.

 

pp. 48-50.  Indictments.

William Bennett of Waddesdon for refusing to do his statutory work on the highways.  [Fined £3, see p. 131.]

Thomas Stevens and Rebecca, his wife, William Johnson, Henry Gravestocke, Frances Kemp, spinster, and Joan Peart, spinster, all of Soulbury, for rioting and assaulting Mary, wife of William Taylor.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Hester Furmerie, widow, Sarah Davyes, widow, Mary Furmerie, spinster, Mary Grover, widow, Elizabeth, wife of John Bates, Alice, wife of Joseph Grover, and [blank] Bates, spinster, all of Barkhamsted St. Peter, co. Hertford, for breaking into the close of John Batchellor at Chesham, taking away four bushels of wheat and four bushels of barley, value £1, and assaulting Mary, his wife.

John Batchellor of Ashley Green in Chesham, yeoman, Mary, his wife, and Thomas Batchellor for assaulting Elizabeth Bates.  [John and Thomas fined 3s. 4d. each; the case against Mary adjourned.]

John Crewes of New Thame, co. Oxford, butcher, for assaulting William Towersey on the highway from Quainton to Aylesbury.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury, John Howse of Broughton in Bierton, gentleman, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, John Temple of Stoke Mandivile, gentleman, and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longfeeald, Bt., of Woolverton, John Tipper, gentleman, John Mabee and [Ann], his wife, Alice Joanes, Frances Carter, and Mary Goodman, widows,

 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1694

 

and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Waters, all of Muresley, and [blank] Mosedell of Fulmer, widow, for absence from church.

Josias Beesouth of Datchett, James Wild of Iver, and Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, for keeping unlicensed ale- houses.

Mary Bethell of Westcott in Wadesdon, widow, for refusing to provide horses and carts for the statutory work upon the highways.  [Not guilty]

Thomas Stevens, William Johnson, Frances Kemp, spinster, and Joan Peart, spinster, for breaking into the garden of William Taylor and assaulting his daughter, Sarah. [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Mary Whitton, alias Pratt, of Stony Stratford, widow, for forcible entry into and detainer of the messuage of Robert Browne.  [Sent for trial: fined 6s. 8d.;  see p. 90.]

Thomas Winter of Hugenden, alias Hutchenden, con- stable of Brandsfee, for negligence in his office.

William Taylor of Soulbury and Mary, his wife, for a breach of the peace.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

John Sutton of Wendover for assaulting John Aldridge. [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Thomas Clarke of Grendon Underwood and John Rogers of Quainton, yeomen, for refusing to assist in the repair of the highways at Edgecott, where they have property. [Not guilty]

 

p. 51.  Presentments of the highway surveyors.

Henry Stokes, David Norman, and Richard Bishop, all of Lillingston Dorrell, for not repairing Ten Acres Lane, which leads from Silson to Hempstead, co. Hertford.

Catherine, Dowager Viscountess Wenman, of Twyford and Alexander Denton of Hillesdon, esquire, for not repairing a footpath in Twyford, which leads from Buckingham to Oxford, and a footbridge at Cowley upon the same footpath.

 

Presentments of the constables.

The persons indicted above for absence from church, 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

and Peter and William Collingridge, both of Guyhurst, farmers, for being popish recusants.

Josiah Beesouth of Datchett for selling beer without a licence.

Richard Stanninutt and William Martyn, constables of Wooborne, and Charles Redd, constable of Cheyneys, for not bringing in their returns of quarteridge money.

 

p. 52. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

 

Penn . . . .

Penn Street . .

Tylerend Green . .

Nottock Green . .

Fingest . . . .

Chesham Boyes . .

Hulcott . . . .

Wooborne . .

 

 

 

Sanderton . .

Ludgershall . .

Horsendon . .

Christopher Bovendon vice Henry Higgins.

Ralph Pessy as tithingman vice Daniel Honour.

William Hancock as tithingman vice William Fryer.

Jepthah Horneblow as tithingman vice John Fryer.

William Tyler vice William Rackley.

William Searl vice John Wingfield.

William Smyth vice William Bishope.

William Banbury and Richard Burcott vice Andrew Lane and William Martin, and Francis Andrews and William Natt as tithingmen vice Ralph Stevens, deceased, and Richard Heddington.

Henry Allen vice Thomas Jackman.

Francis Sherley vice Leonard Wallington.

Edward Neighbour vice Frederick Bowler.

 

Orders.

 

p. 53.  Order extending the recognizance of Lawrence Buckney of Soulbury, farmer.

 

Edward Learhead of Agmundisham, yeoman, who was indicted at the Easter Session for dismissing Mary Gates, his apprentice, and refusing to take her back into his service, is

 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1694

 

now ordered to pay £3. 10s. to the parish of Agmundisham, out of the £4 paid by them when the apprentice was bound, and the apprenticeship is now discharged.

 

The recognizance of Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victualler, to appear and answer for keeping an unlicensed alehouse, is filed with the records of the court.

 

p. 54.  Order staying further proceedings against John Noare of Ivinghoe, for refusing to pay his quarteridge money, until the matter has been investigated by certain justices.

 

Sir Thomas Cobb, Bt., of Atterbury, co. Oxford, and the inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesdon given further time to produce a certificate that their ditches have been scoured.

 

Mary Bethell of Westcott in Waddesdon, widow, discharged from the indictment against her for not repairing the highway at Westcott Gapp, upon producing a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.

 

p. 55.  Order extending the recognizance of John Batcheller of Chesham, yeoman, for the appearance of Mary, his wife, to answer an indictment for assaulting Elizabeth Bates.

 

Richard Stanninutt and William Martin, constables of Wooborne, discharged from the presentment against them for not paying in their quarteridge money, as they have now paid in the money.

 

The inhabitants of Ilmer are discharged from the indictment against them for not repairing part of the highway from Bisciter, co. Oxford, to Chepping Wycombe, through the land of William Young, as they have produced a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.

 

p. 56.  The overseers of Cheddington ordered to pay an allowance of 1s. 6d. a week to Mary Pitkin.  If they are

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

able to prove that the house where she lives is in fact in Ivinghoe, then the overseers of Ivinghoe shall reimburse them.

 

The inhabitants of Weston Turvile are discharged from the indictment against them for not repairing Marrow Way, part of the highway to Aylesbury, upon producing a justices' certificate that the work has now been done.

 

Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land in Leckhamsted in respect of an indictment against the parish for non-repair of highways.

 

p. 57.  The surveyors of Soulbury authorized to raise a 3d. rate for the repair of their highways, in accordance with the act.  The surveyors of Stoke Mandivile are similarly authorized to raise a 6d. rate.

 

p. 58.  Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his quarter's salary by John How, one of the treasurers.

 

The order concerning Welwick Farm is extended for another session.  [See p. 23.]

 

Order “that the letter from their Majesties Commissioners of Excise be openly and publickly read and then fyled by the Clerke of the Peace with the Records of this Sessions.”

 

p. 59.  Order allowing the adjourned appeal of Edgecott against a warrant removing Joan Cherry from Quainton.

 

Writ of distringas to be issued by the sheriff against the inhabitants of Horsenden, in respect of an indictment for not repairing part of the highway from Bisceter, co. Oxford, to Chepping Wycombe.  The issue of the writ had been postponed from time to time on various pretexts, but the Court had come to the conclusion that the inhabitants of Horsenden had “trifled” with them.

 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1694

 

Order adjourning further proceedings in the indictments against the inhabitants of Akely and Padbury for non- repair of their highways.

 

p. 60.  Order extending the recognizances of Richard Seaton of Barton Hartshorne, yeoman, in respect of an indictment for non-repair of a highway.

 

Catherine, Dowager Lady Wenman, who stands indicted with Alexander Denton of Hillersdon, esquire, for not repairing a bridge on the highway from Twyford to Buckingham, expressed through her counsel her willingness to perform the work, but stated that she could not do so without Mr. Denton’s help.  She asked that further action on the indictment might be postponed until Mr. Denton could be “prevailed upon to concurr with her,” to which course the Court agreed.

 

The surveyors of Chepping Wycombe Forrens authorized to raise a 6d.  rate for the repair of the highways there.

 

p. 61.  The overseers of Penn ordered to pay an allowance of 2s. a week to John Fryer, an old man of 80 years.

 

Order cancelling the forfeiture of the recognizance of John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher, for non- appearance, and extending it until next session.

 

p. 62.  Order cancelling a previous order of court that Thomas Styles senior should pay an annuity of £10 to his son Thomas of West Wycombe, and directing that in future the father should allow his son 2s. 6d. a week, “by reason of his lameness.”

 

[William] Benson, the gaoler, to be repaid £3. 2s. 6d., spent by him on “provideing a Waggon and Horses and a Guard of severall Persons armed to Convey severall Prisoners from the said Goal to the last Assizes held at Buckingham.”

 

p. 63.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 10s. by Daniel,Gyles, 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

one of the treasurers, for maintaining Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, who was born in the gaol.

 

The overseers of Swanborne ordered to pay an allowance of 2s. a week to Matthew Waters.

 

The inhabitants of Biddlesden discharged from an indictment for not repairing Bakers Bridge, on the Bucking- ham road, on their producing a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.  The inhabitants of Hillsden similarly discharged from an indictment for not repairing King’s Bridge, on the Buckingham road.

 

p. 64.  Order referring to the justices for the three hundreds of Chilterne the complaint of Mr. Charles Harris “that their Majesties Officers of the Excise for this County doe require of him and other persons in this County who doe make Sydar and Sell it by the great to pay the duty of Excise for the same whereas by Law the Retayler is only Chargeable with the said Duty, and that the said Officers doe take upon them under Colour of Secureing the said Dutyes to dis- courage and interrupt the Sale of such Sydar to the great Damage of the makers thereof.”

 

p. 65.  Order extending the recognizance of Tobias Churchill of Steeple Cleydon, gentleman.

 

Thomas Barnewell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £6. 13s. 4d. by Daniel Gyles, the treasurer for the “lower division,” for money spent on County business.

 

The clerk of the peace to be paid 9s. 6d. by John Gibbons, one of the treasurers, “for a large Paper Booke prepared for to enter the Process and Orders of this Court.”

 

pp. 66-72.  The inhabitants of Lillingstone Dayrell dis- charged from an indictment against them for not repairing part of the highway from Akely to Torcester, co. Northampton, upon their producing a justices’ certificate.

 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1694

 

William Awd of Beachampton, yeoman, similarly discharged for not scouring certain watercourses on his land and a ditch near the house of John Turner, on the road from Nash to Stony Stratford.

Caversfield similarly discharged in respect of part of the highway from Frankford, co. Oxford, to Bisceter, co. Oxford.

Twyford and Cowley similarly discharged in respect of certain watercourses between the two parishes.

William Chaloner, lord of the manor of Steeple Claydon, similarly discharged in respect of a watercourse by Wood Lane, which leads from Gritmore to Brackley, co. Northampton, in the parishes of Steeple Claydon and Charndon.

Elizabeth Miller of Hillsden, widow, similarly discharged in respect of part of the highway to Buckingham and in respect of part of Thomas Parratt’s Lane, which leads from Banbury, co. Oxford, to Aylesbury.

Thornborough similarly discharged in respect of Long Bridge, on the Winslow road.

Preston Bissett similarly discharged in respect of part of the lane there to the common.

The executors of George Grinville, esquire, similarly discharged in respect of certain trees which obstructed the highway from Foskett to Stony Stratford.

 

p. 73.  John Rose, bridwell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s. by John Gibbons, one of the treasurers of the “upper division.”

 

pp. 74-75.  Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of the following: John and Thomas Batchellor and John Crewes [See pp. 48-50] Richard Deller, John Lee, Thomas Curle, Roger Ewer, and John Rogers. [See pp. 2-4.]

Edward Leered of Agmundisham, yeoman, fined 3s. 4d. for refusing to take back Mary Gates, his apprentice, whom he had discharged.  (From the Easter session.)

The inhabitants of Lillingstone Dorrell, for whom John Major, yeoman, appeared, were found not guilty of not 

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repairing part of the highway to Chapple Green.  (From the Easter session.)

Mary, wife of William Tayler, Thomas Tayler junior, and Mary Tayler, spinster, all of Soulbury, found not guilty of assaulting William Newland junior, “a speciall Bayliffe,” and “rescueing” a cow from his custody.  (From the Epiphany session.)

Edward Beckley of Swanborne, yeoman, fined 6s. 8d. for taking away “a weather Tegg sheep seized by the Lords of the Mannor . . . as an Estrey.” (From the Epiphany session.)

John Pelzer of Wooborne, gentleman, and Thomas English, alias English Tom, fined 3s. 4d. each, for breaking a sluice belonging to George Clewer of Chepping Wycombe. (From the Easter session.)

John Bigg and Richard Rutt, both of Chepping Wycombe, gentlemen, fined 3s. 4d. each for diverting a watercourse.  (From the Easter session.)

 

p. 76.  Recognizances extended.

Lawrence Buckney of Soulbury, farmer, in £10 to answer for an assault.

John Inwood of Stewkly, yeoman, in £20, with Thomas Bull of Stewkley and William Newland of Wing, yeoman, in £10 each, for Jane, wife of John Inwood, to keep the peace towards Jane, wife of John Bull.

Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victualler, in £20, with Joseph Newell of Princes Risborow, yeoman, as surety in £10, “not to keep an alehouse.”

John Batchellor of Chesham and William Grove of Beconsfield, cordwainer, in £10 each for the appearance of Mary, wife of the above John.

John Atkinson of Chepping Wycomb, butcher, in £10 for his good behaviour.

Tobias Churchill of Steeple Claydon, gentleman, in £10 to appear and answer for refusing to pay his servant, Peter Cleaver.

Ann Warner of Aylesbury, spinster, in £10, with Thomas Kempster and Thomas Toms, both of Aylesbury, victuallers, 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1694

 

as sureties in £10 each, for her to appear and prosecute Alice White and Elizabeth Jessop.

 

p. 77.  Recognizances entered into.

The following in £10 each to appear and answer— Joseph Gate of Chesham, turner, on two counts, Thomas Stevens of Soulbury, maltster, on two counts, Thomas Bigg of Fulmer and Silvester Lane of Dinton, victuallers, John Sutton of Wendover and John Butler of Eaton, labourers, and Mary Whitton, alias Pratt, of Stony Stratford, widow.

William Taylor senior of Soulbury, labourer, in £10 for the appearance of Mary, his wife.

Thomas Stevens of Soulbury, yeoman, in £10 to keep the peace towards Mary Taylor.

 

pp. 78-79. Fines and issues.

The fines of the persons convicted on pp. 74-75.

 

p. 80. Recognizances discharged.

William Walter, Thomas Walter, and Francis Neal, all of Ilmer, yeomen, William Brookes and Thomas Brookes, both of Aylesbury, yeomen, William Horwood of Aston Clynton, Thomas Curle of Swanborne, and William Taylor of Soulbury, alias Sulbury, farmers, John Major of Lilling- stone Dorrell and Edward Beckley of Swanburne, yeomen, Richard Deller of Bray, co. Berks, gentleman, John Lee of Cookeham, co. Berks, yeoman, Ann Waters, spinster, and Francis Williams, innholder, both of Lowdwater in Chepping Wycomb, Joan Samms of Chepping Wycomb, Ann, wife of Ephraim Munck, and Edward Wetherley, labourer, both of Chalfont St. Peters, Thomas Batchellor of Chesham, labourer, William Grove of Beconsfield, cordwainer, John Batchellor of Chesham, labourer, Francis Lane, bargemaster, Thomas Butterfield, gentleman, and Francis Andrews, bargeman, all of Wooborne, Eleanor, wife of [blank] Squire, Philip Butter- field, weaver, and Peter Horton, chapman, all of Iver, Edward Leerwood of Amersham, labourer, John Putnam, Thomas Hall, draper, and Richard Davy, yeoman, all of Chesham, Thomas Simmonds, maltster, William Simmonds, 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

periwig - maker, Matthew Dagnal, bookseller, Nathaniel Netmaker, gentleman, Henry Bass senior, yeoman, Henry Goodson, collar-maker, Alice, wife of [blank] White, Elizabeth Jessop, Thomas Toms, victualler, and Alexander North, barber, all of Aylesbury, Bernard Buckney, John Wingfield, Henry Stevens, and Thomas Stevens, all of Soulbury, farmers, Elizabeth, wife of George Webb, James Duglas, cordwainer, and Samuel Phillipps, bargeman, all of Great Marlow, Ann Grinnett, William Carter, farmer, and Henry Ridley, victualler, all of Little Marlow, John Wade of Great Marlow, yeoman, and Geoffrey, his son, William Tayler junior and Thomas Goss, both of Soulbury, yeomen, William Hawtin, alias Harting, of Wendover Forrens, yeoman, James Price, miller, Henry Johnson, yeoman, Thomas Price, joiner, John Sutton, collar-maker, Ralph Grace, victualler, and William Pawley, blacksmith, all of Wendover, Samuel Bampton of Pollicott, yeoman, Richard Silbey, labourer, and Hannah Silbey, spinster, both of Wooborne, John Bates, labourer, and Hester Farmerie, spinster, both of Berkhamsted St. Peter, co. Hertford, Robert Browne of Yardley, co. Northampton, Frances Westley of Little Marlow, Jeremiah Goodchild of Great Marlow, meal man, and John Aldridge of Wendover, maltster.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

 

pp. 81-82.  [Blank.]

 

EPIPHANY SESSION AT AYLESBURY

17th January, 1694-95 [6 William III]

 

p. 83.  Jurors for the body of the county.

Nathaniel Birch, gentleman, Thomas Brookes, Michael Welles, Richard Madge, James Reynolds, John Bennett, John Perkins, Henry Markham, Thomas Tarbox, Bernard Collins, John Webb, Jonas Harding, John Jemmitt, Thomas 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1694-95

 

Holland, Henry Lee, Matthew Chater, Isaac Henley, John Phillips, Thomas Hale, Daniel Rubert, and William Haines.

(signed) Johnshall Crosse, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against John Butler and Mary Whitton, alias Pratt.

Joseph Bampton, John Jorden, Thomas Ray, William Burt, Richard Towersey, John Rider, John Tomson, William Tomson, William Deverell, Thomas Sills, Joseph Turpin, and Samuel Gurney for the first case, and Richard Horwood for the second.

(signed) Johnshall Crosse, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 84.  William Gilmore of Great Missenden, gentleman, took the oaths contained in I William and Mary, c. I, and subscribed the declaration against transubstantiation and that contained in 30 Charles II, stat 2, c. I.

 

p. 85.  Indictments.

John Stapp, victualler, and William Gibbs, butcher, both of Fenny Stratford, for assaulting Nicholas Lucas. [Fined 5s. each.]

Edward Smith, constable of Weston Underwood, for allowing the escape of George King, Thomas Cooper, and Joseph Hopcroft, whom he had arrested on a warrant for stealing deer from the Chase of George, Earl of Northampton. [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Henry Newcombe, constable of Ravenstone, for similarly allowing the escape of William Clarke, Thomas Crosse, and Richard Payne, arrested for the same offence.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Josias Beesouth of Datchett, labourer, for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.  [Discharged.]

 

Presentment of the grand jury.

The inhabitants of Weston Turvile for not repairing a footpath at a place called Vaches, between Vache Brook and Bedgrove Field, on the road between Aston Clynton and Aylesbury.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

p. 86. Presentments of the constables.

Silvester Lane of Dinton, labourer, for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

Thomas Winter, constable of Brandsfee, for not bring- ing in his presentments, to John Hill, chief constable.

Sir Edward Longvile of Wolverton, Peter Collingridge and William Collingridge, both of Guyhurst, labourers, John Tipper, gentleman, John Maybee, labourer, and [Ann], his wife, Mary Goodman, Alice Joanes, and Frances Carter, widows, and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Waters, all of Muresly, and Mrs. [Blank] Mosdale of Fulmer, for recusancy.

Robert Adams, gentleman, and Josiah Askew, lords of the manor of Swanborne, for not having a constable. [Quashed, see p. 96.]

Thomas Haynes of Brill, labourer, for selling beer without a licence.

John Tomson of Eaton, labourer, for poaching.

 

Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Boveney in . . John Batting vice John Arden, and

Burnham William Butler as tithingman vice Henry Tucker.

Broughton . . . . John Kent vice William How.

Buckland . . . . Thomas Wright vice Henry Brandon.

Foard in Dinton . . John Dover vice Richard Parker.

Wingrave . . . . John Wheeler vice Richard Harley.

Wing . . . . Robert Fincher and John Munday vice Thomas Leech and Daniel Perrott.

Crafton in Wing . . Richard Keen vice William Grant.

Stoke Mandivile . . Samuel Brown and Henry Harding vice Richard Brown and Thomas Harris.

 

Orders.

p. 87.  Order extending the recognizance of Richard Gosnold, gentleman.

 

Sir Thomas Cobb, Bt., discharged from an indictment for not scouring certain ditches, upon producing a justices’ certificate.  [See p.  4.]

 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1694-95

 

Ann Warner, Thomas Kempster, and Thomas Toms discharged from their recognizances to appear and prosecute Alice White and Elizabeth Jessopp.

 

Order suppressing the alehouse of John Norris of Edgecott, upon his conviction for keeping a disorderly house and entertaining vagabonds.

 

p. 88.  Order allowing the appeal of Aston Rowant, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Richard Tripp and his family from Bledlow.  The decision of this case had been referred to the Lord Chief Justice.  [See pp. 15, 118, and 164.]

 

Order allowing the appeal of Great Horwood against a justices’ order directing them to pay an allowance of 3s. a week to Mary, wife of William Francklyn.

 

p. 89.  The case of the expenses of Daniel Butler is referred to certain other justices, as those appointed have been unable to act.  [See p. 19.]

 

The inhabitants of the Forrens of Chepping Wycombe appealed to the Court for a ruling as to whether it was legally possible to apply for a removal order in the following case.  Richard Robins, “a Preacher or Teacher of a Congregation that deny infant Baptism within the said Forrens, had under pretence of his hireing a dwelling house and meeting house at great rents, amounting together to above tenn pounds per annum, endeavoured to settle himself and his family there as Inhabitants, and the said Mr. Robins insisting that these rents qualified him so to bee, notwith- standing severall of his Auditors were supposed to have engaged for the payment of the said rents.”  The Court held that such a tenure did not qualify Mr. Robins as an inhabitant.

 

p. 90.  John Tokefield, surety for the appearance of Samuel Bunce of Chesham, yeoman, who has defaulted, appealed for an extension of the recognizance until next session, promising that “in the mean tyme hee would endeavour to apprehend” Bunce.  The request was granted.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Further adjournment of the dispute between Woofton and Loughton.  [See pp. 16 and 120.]

 

Postponement of further action on the indictment against the inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesden.  [See p. 4.]

 

Mary Whitton, alias Pratt, of Stony Stratford com- mitted to gaol until she pays her fine of 6s. 8d. [See p. 49.]

 

p. 91.  Adjournment of the appeal of Medmenham against a warrant settling Elizabeth Ginger there.

Padbury discharged from three indictments for non- repair of highways, upon producing justices’ certificates that the work had been done.  The first was in respect of part of the road to Winslow, the second in respect of part of the road to Buckingham, between White Bridge and Great Bridge, and the third in respect of a watercourse called Sticked Ford.

 

p. 92.  Order confirming a warrant removing John Truelove junior from Soulbury to Layghton Buzard, co. Bedford.

 

Order that the jury which tried the case against John Butler shall attend again in the afternoon.

 

Order referring to the justices for the three hundreds of Aylesbury the appeal of Joseph Pedder against the rates at Great Missenden.

 

p. 93.  Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land at Akely in respect of an indictment against the parish for non-repair of highways.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Agmundisham, alias Amersham, against a warrant removing Adam Howard and his three children from Penn.

 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1694-95

 

Adjournment of the appeal of West Wycombe against a warrant removing Thomas Cawdle from Sanderton.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Tyngewick against a warrant removing John Mynn from Westbury.

 

p. 94.  Orders extending the recognizances of Joseph Gates of Chesham, and Thomas Bigg of Fulmer and Silvester Lane of Dinton, victuallers.

 

Thomas Stevens of Soulbury, yeoman, given leave to withdraw his pleas of not guilty to two indictments against him.  Similar orders in the cases of William Taylor senior of Soulbury, labourer, and Mary, his wife, and John Sutton of Wendover, labourer.

 

p. 95.  Order referring to the justices for the three hundreds of Aylesbury the appeal of Gresham Hakewill, gentleman, against his assessment to the rate for the repair of the highways at Weston Turvile.

 

Orders adjourning further process against Thomas Borne of Bledlow, victualler, on two indictments, and against Thomas Clarke of Grendon Underwood, yeoman, and William Bennett of Waddesden on one indictment each.

 

Orders extending the recognizances of Lawrence Buckney of Soulbury, farmer, John Batchellor of Chesham, yeoman, and Mary, his wife, John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher, and Tobias Churchill of Steeple Cleydon, gentleman.

 

p. 96.  Order quashing the presentment of Edward Beckley and Thomas Curle, constables of Swanburne, against Robert Adams and Josiah Askew, gentlemen, lords of the manor of Swanburne, for not having a constable, “the said Default of the Lords being not presentable by the Petty Constables.”

 

Order postponing the imposition of fines upon owners of land in Leckhamsted in respect of an indictment against the parish for non-repair of highways.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Drayton Beauchampe against a warrant settling Elizabeth Barker there.

 

Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s. by John How, treasurer for the “lower division.”

 

Order adjourning further process against Richard Seaton of Barton Hartshome, yeoman, in respect of an indictment for non-repair of a highway.

 

p. 97.  Order allowing the appeal of Lurgarshall against a warrant removing Peter Tyler, labourer, from Wooton Underwood.

 

Order confirming a warrant removing Joyce Mountagu, spinster, from Aston Clynton to Wigginton, co. Hertford.

 

p. 98.  Adjournment of the case against Weston Turvile. [See p. 85.]

 

Adjournment of the case against John Webb of Leckhamsted for not repairing a lane between Akely and Stony Stratford.

 

Daniel Gyles, the treasurer for the “lower division,” ordered to pay an allowance of £1. 5s. a quarter to Rose Roberts of Oldwick, widow, “in regard of her great age and infirmityes . . . confirmed . . . by the Certificate of Mr. John Pilkington, Viccar of Swanburne.”

 

p. 99.  William Benson, the gaoler, petitioned the Court that he was “not able to hold and bear the said place of Goaler without some allowance or yearly Pension” in view of the fact that he had been obliged to strengthen the gaol in several places “by reason of severall rude and disorderly persons now and lately in his Custody,” and of the fact that “hee hath now in his Custody Eleaven Poor Prisoners altogether unable to pay or satisfy him for their Dyett and Lodging.”  He was allowed £6. 5s. towards the cost of the 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1694-95

 

repairs and was permitted to make a further application for a yearly salary.

 

The overseers of Walton ordered to pay an allowance of 1s. 6d. a week to Thomas Reed.

 

Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 17s. 6d. for one quarter’s maintenance of Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, who was born in the gaol.

 

p. 100.  The overseers of Wendover ordered to pay an allow- ance of 3s. a week to Amy, wife of Gabriel Prentice, for the support of herself and her four children while her husband is in gaol.  [See p. 123.]

 

Order reducing the fine to be imposed for non-attendance on the grand jury to four nobles [i.e. £1. 6s. 8d.].

 

Thomas Barnewell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £5 for County business.

 

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycombe, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s. by John Gibbons, the treasurer for the “upper division.”

 

pp. 101-102. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of the following: John Stapp, William Gibbs, Henry Newcombe, and Edward Smith [see p. 85], Mary Whitton, alias Pratt, Thomas Stevens (on two charges) and Rebecca, his wife, William Johnson (on two charges), Henry Gravestock, Joan Peart (on two charges), William Taylor and Mary, his wife, and John Sutton [see pp. 48-50]. John Norris [see pp. 2-4], Samuel Veary [see p. 5], and John Butler of Eaton, labourer, who was found not guilty of diverting a watercourse near the highway from New Windsor to Colebrooke [indicted at the last Easter Session].

 

p. 103. Recognizances extended.

Richard Gosnold of Woborne in £10, with Charles Blewett of Great Marlow, barber-surgeon, and William

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

Paltock of Chepping Wycombe, miller, as sureties in £10 each, to keep the peace towards Mary, wife of Francis Spire.

Samuel Bunce of Chesham, yeoman, in £20, with John Tokefield of Chesham, yeoman, as surety in £10, to keep the peace.

The recognizances of Joseph Gate, Thomas Bigg, and Silvester Lane, given above on p. 77.

The recognizances of Lawrence Buckney, John Batchellor, John Atkinson, Tobias Churchill, and Thomas Bourne, given above on p. 76.

 

p. 104. Recognizances entered into.

Richard Saunders, Francis Goodchild, and John Goodchild, all of Princes Risborow, and William Blackwell of Great Kimble, yeomen, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

Frederick Bowler of Princes Risborow, yeoman, in £80 to appear and answer two indictments on behalf of the inhabitants of Horsenden.

William Nash of Beconsfield, farmer, in £40 to appear and answer.

William Adams of Quarindon, labourer, in £40, with Richard Briars of Waddesdon and Henry Warner of Quarindon, yeomen, as sureties in £20 each, for his appear- ance in respect of the bastard child of Mary Pilgrim.

Charles Heyward of Aylesbury, baker, in £20, with Henry Clarke, cordwainer, and Thomas Woodward, victualler, both of Aylesbury, as sureties in £10 each, for his appearance to answer a charge of contempt of court.

 

pp. 105-106. Fines and issues.

William Carter of Great Kimbell fined £1. 6s. 8d. for non-attendance on a jury.

The fines of the persons convicted on pp. 101-102.

 

p. 107. Recognizances discharged.

John Innwood and Thomas Bull, both of Stewkly, yeomen, William Newland of Wing, yeoman, Ann Warner, spinster, and Thomas Kempster and Thomas Toms, vic- tuallers, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Stevens, brewer, and 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1694-95

 

William Taylor, labourer, both of Soulbury, John Sutton of Wendover, labourer, Edward Smith of Weston Underwood, carpenter, Matthew Chater of Olney, butcher, Henry Newcombe of Ravenstone, labourer, Henry Andrew of Olney, maltster, John Robinson of Sherington, labourer, Thomas Robinson of Brayfield - on - the - Green, co. Northampton, labourer, Nathaniel Aston and George Foster, both of Bletchley, William Joanes of Simpson, baker, Thomas Burges of Bletchley, farmer, Henry Willmott, butcher, and Thomas Hawkes and John Bentley, labourers, all of Brill, Luke Randell of Oakly, labourer, John Badger and Thomas Pawling, both of Shabington, yeoman, William Yerwood, labourer, and William Miller, stone-mason, both of Preston, William Adams of Quarindon, labourer, Richard Briars of Waddesdon, yeoman, Henry Warner of Quarindon, yeoman, Thomas Layton, labourer, William Brookes, yeoman, Richard Hoare, cordwainer, James Philipps, labourer, John Mayden, butcher, Thomas Francklyn, yeoman, William Cocks, labourer, Thomas Kingham, cordwainer, Richard Saunders, bricklayer, Geoffrey Miles, labourer, William Healey, brick- layer, and John Hawkes, tailor, all of Aylesbury, Mary Forster, spinster, and John Forster and William Browne, yeomen, all of Weston Turvile, Nicholas Lucas of Simpson, yeoman, and Thomas Harris, bricklayer, and Richard Kempster, yeoman, both of Aylesbury.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 108. [Blank.]

 

EASTER SESSION

AT AYLESBURY

4th April, 1695 [7 William III]

 

p. 109. Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Lake, gentleman, Thomas Piddington, Francis Horton, Ephraim Holt, gentleman, William Rice junior, John Phillips, gentleman, Henry Cooper, Thomas King, Christopher Payne, William Gaffield, John Keene, John 

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Bradbury, Francis Putnam, John Turner, Robert Skevington, gentleman, Hawthorn Charge, and William Tapp.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against William Nash, William Blackwell, Francis and John Goodchild, Richard Saunders, and the in- habitants of Horsenden.

Joseph Bampton, John Jordan, gentleman, Thomas Barnaby, Thomas Brookes, Peter Goldsworth, John Goldsworth, Thomas Ray, Thomas Bampton, Richard Harvey, Samuel Gurney, gentleman, Thomas Noare, and Henry Webb.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 110.  Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff, Thomas Barnewell of Aylesbury, gentleman, deputy sheriff, and George Clewer of Chepping Wycombe, took the oaths contained in I William and Mary, c. I, and subscribed the declaration against transubstantiation and that contained in 30 Charles II, stat. 2, c. I.

 

P. 111. Indictments.

Thomas Clements of Beconsfield, victualler, for stealing a cock and seven hens, value 5s. from William Adams. [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Sir Edward Longvile, Bt., of Wolverton, Peter and William Collingridge, both of Guyhurst, labourers, John Tipper, gentleman, John Maybee, labourer, and [Ann], his wife, Mary Goodman, Alice Joanes, and Frances Carter, widow, and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Waters, all of Muresly, and [blank] Mosedale of Fulmer, for recusancy.

Silvester Lane of Dinton and Thomas Haynes of Brill, labourers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

The inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesdon for not repairing part of the highway to Winslow at Westcott Gapp.

Edward Beckley and Thomas Curle, yeomen, constables of Swanburne, for negligence in keeping watch.

George Thorpe of Walton in Aylesbury, yeoman, for assaulting William Brookes.

 

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p. 112. Presentments of the grand jury.

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury, pewterer, John Hows of Bierton, gentleman, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, [John] Temple of Stoke Mandevile, gentleman, and [Ann], his wife, and Sir Robert Throgmorton, Bt., John West, James Sturdy, [blank] Sturdy, widow, John Fisher, and [blank] Rooke, gentleman, all of Weston Underwood, for absence from church.

 

Presentments of the constables.

The first six persons presented above for absence from church, and the persons indicted above for recusancy, all for recusancy.

Silvester Lane of Dinton, Francis London of Cublington, and James Wild of Iver, for selling beer without a licence.

Edward Fastnidge of Princes Risborow for building a cottage at Speen without assigning four acres of land, and William Lane of the same for building a cottage on the Green “to the straightning of the Highway.”

 

p. 113.  Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . . . Thomas Bampton of Aston Clynton and John Darvall of Princes Risborough, gentlemen, vice John Hill and Henry Mead, gentlemen.

Newport . . . . John Matthew of Newport Pagnell and George Dudley of Great Wollston, gentlemen, vice Philip Freeman and Thomas Lane, gentlemen.

Buckingham . . John Warr junior of Hillsdon and John Taylor of Leckhamsted, gentlemen, vice Richard Waddupp and Robert Tayler, gentlemen.

Cotteslow . . . . Thomas Harris of Soulbury and Joseph Gurney of Linslade, gentlemen, vice John Grace and Thomas Wooster, gentlemen.

Ashenden . . . . Thomas Millward of Bottle Claydon and William Tipping of Wornall,

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 4

 

gentleman, vice William Bennett and Henry Cox, gentlemen.

Stoke . . . . John Nicholas of Denham and Thomas Raynor of Horton, gentlemen, vice Henry Stanley and William Style, gentlemen.

Desborough . . Henry Francklin of Little Marlow and Daniel Kingham of Chepping Wycomb, gentlemen, vice David Jones and William Sparkes, gentle- men.

Burnham . . . . John Lee of Beconsfield and James Norwood of Amersham, gentlemen, vice Robert Aldridge and Richard Grimsdale, gentlemen.

 

p. 114.  Treasurers sworn.

For the King’s Bench and   Marshalsea   William Johnson of Ivinghoe-Aston and  John Ferrers of Fingest, gentlemen,  vice John Howe and John Gibbons,   gentlemen.

For the maimed soldiers   Thomas Kidgell of Northall, gentleman,  vice Daniel Gyles; and John Bigg, gentlemen, continued in office.

 

pp. 115—117.  Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury . . . . Robert Todd and Thomas Ball vice Richard Defrane and William Edmunds.

Great Kimbell . . Edward Smith and John West vice Joseph Goodchild and William Carter.

Little Kimbell . . William Warden vice Richard Ingram.

Great Missenden . . John Bennett vice Nathaniel Child.

Little Missenden . . Thomas Axdell junior vice William Anthony, and Thomas Woster as tithingman vice Tobias Bowler.

Princes Risborow . . Thomas Bowler junior, tailor, vice Ralph Dennis.

 

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EASTER SESSION, 1695

 

Monks Risborow . . William Brookes and Richard Beddall vice Thomas Stevenson and William Monke.

Ellesborough . . John Prince and William Allen vice Joseph Smith and William Eldridge.

Walton . . . . Thomas Stocken and John Cutler vice Thomas Dearing and Robert Gascoigne.

Halton . . . . John Tomson vice Joseph Brill.

Broughton . . . . Robert Dover vice William Johnson.

Bearton . . . . Thomas Munck vice John Stratford.

Bledlow . . . . Edward Sale vice Robert Deane.

Bledlow Ridge . . Ambrose Newell vice William Butler.

Brands Fee . . Thomas Morton junior vice Thomas Winter, and Nathaniel Dean as tithingman vice Henry Moreton.

Cuddington . . John Cox senior vice John Norris.

Loosly Row . . Stephen Hawes as tithingman vice John Mead.

Newport hundred—

Clifton Reynes . . Thomas Stubbs vice James Laughton.

Astwood . . . . Richard Rowton vice Richard Brincklow.

North Crawly . . John Darlin and William Welles vice Thomas Nash and William Bitchenall.

Little Crawly . . John Glidewell vice John Bunker.

Sherrington . . John Rogers and Anthony Lighting vice Thomas Lucas and Samuel Cunningham.

Stony Stratford, West Side William Browne, cordwainer, vice John Clarke.

Stony Stratford, East Side  Anthony Forfitt vice Arthur Dennis.

Great Wolston . . William Brick vice Richard Dudley.

Bow Brickhill . . Richard White vice Thomas Welles.

Eaton . . . . William King vice Thomas Smart.

Little Wolston . . William Edmunds vice William Burgess.

Simpson . . . . John Goodman vice Nicholas Lucas.

Calverton . . . . William Booten vice Richard Garlick.

Woughton . . John Smith vice John Craper.

 

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Stoke Hamond . . John Cock and William Bishopp vice Peter Woodward and John Horne.

Weston Underwood William Brice vice Edward Smith.

Hanslopp . . . . William Garrett vice William Slatyer.

Loughton . . . . John Furnis vice Withers Nicholls.

Blechley . . . . John Phillips vice William Daniell.

Cold Brafield . . John Keep vice William Bird.

Buckingham hundred—

Hillesden . . . . Thomas Hunt vice George Staley.

Steeple Claydon . . Edward Ingram vice Thomas King.

Cotteslow hundred—

Hogson . . . . Edward Turnham senior vice William Turnham.

Mentmore . . . . Richard Collett and Solomon Heddy vice John Saunders and Thomas Roberts.

Linslad . . . . John Gurney vice John Hickman.

Stewkly . . . . Thomas Bull vice Henry Sheppard.

Wingrave . . . . Henry Adkins vice Matthew King.

Edlesborough . . Daniel Cooke and William Tilcock vice Richard Bruges and Edward Stanebridge.

Soulbury . . . . John Tayler vice Richard Grombe.

Slapton . . . . Thomas Batte vice James Turney.

Draighton Parslow Robert Inward and Richard Chandler senior vice William Peare and Richard Chandler junior.

Dunton . . . . Samuel Fryer vice Thomas Steward.

Muresly . . . . George Bayly and John Hall vice Henry Pitkin and Thomas Stevens.

Whitchurch . . George Whitmill and John Howes vice John Harris and Richard Grace.

Swanburne  . . John Carter and Edward Bond vice Thomas Curle and Edward Beckly.

Weedon . .  . . Thomas Parratt vice Henry Moores.

Hardwick . . . . Michael Seamans vice Hugh Miller.

Cublington . . James Lucas and Francis London vice Richard Keanes and John Billington.

Ashendon hundred—

North Marston . . James Foster and Thomas Reeve vice Ralph Stevens and John Lucas.

 

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Quainton . . . . Joseph Crooke vice John Hughes.

Studley . . . . Richard Coates vice Lawrence King.

Wornall . . . . Richard Stevens vice Thomas Smith.

Westcott . . . . John Beck vice John Fellow.

Waddesdon . . Michael Batterson senior and Thomas Allen vice Nathaniel Piddington and William Mayne.

Chilton . . . . Robert Green vice Richard Morton.

Wooton Underwood William Richardson and Edward Pitham vice Richard Howes and Henry Barbor.

Kingsey . . . . Thomas Birch vice Thomas Cripps.

Hogshaw . . . . Christopher Dimock vice Joseph Stevens.

Stoke hundred—

Eaton . . . . John Cooper and Henry Chilton vice John Gouldhock and William Gold- hawke.

The Gildables . . Thomas Barnsby vice Henry Saxton, and William Field and John Piper as tithingmen vice Francis Oakley and John Marcham.

Denham .   . . Thomas Jennings and John Turner vice John Gardner and [Robert] Tyler.

Horton . . . . Samuel Bowry vice Matthew Hemperby.

Colebrooke in Thomas Biddill vice Isaac Redford.

Horton

Desborough hundred—

Little Marlow . . John Wild vice William Carter, and William Draper senior as tithingman vice Robert Moody.

Radnedge . . . Daniel Chapman vice John Smith junior.

Bradenham . . Thomas Sharpe vice Thomas English.

West Wycombe Robert Hobbs vice Thomas Russell.

Town

West Wycombe Thomas Wheeler vice Francis Deane.

Parish

Hambledon . . Ralph Randall and John Rockall vice Ralph Ayre and Thomas Elbery, and 

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Francis Heddington as tithingman vice John White.

Turfield . . . . John Barnes vice John Toovey, and Ralph Rolles as tithingman vice John Cawdrey.

Burnham hundred—

Sippenham  . . Thomas North vice John Westcott.

Dorney . . . . Eusebius Windsor vice Richard Suding.

Taplow . . . . Richard Walker vice William Sharpe, and William Whittington as tithing- man vice [Thomas Beck].

Beconsfield . .  Elias Birt and John Grove junior vice Robert Hill and William Smith, and Richard Rowlanson and John Presson as tithingmen vice George Tomson and Christopher Beamon.

Hugely . . . . William Grove vice William Grove senior.

Cheynes . . . . James Wingfield vice Thomas Redd.

 

Orders.

 

p. 118.  Orders extending the recognizances of Samuel Bunce of Chesham, yeoman, and Mary Batchellor.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Hardwick cum Weedon against a warrant removing James Gooding from Buckland.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Aston Rowant, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing the children of Richard Tripp from Bledlow.  [See pp. 15, 88, and 164.]

 

p. 119.  Order allowing the appeal of Little Horwood against a warrant removing Henry Stevens from Nash in Whaddon.

 

Matthew Annesly and John Rose, bridewell-keepers at Newport Pagnell and Chepping Wycomb respectively, to be paid their quarter’s salary of £7. 10s. each.

 

Order extending the recognizance of Silvester Lane.

 

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p. 120.  The justices for the hundred of Newport presented their report upon the dispute between Woofton and Loughton concerning the conveyance of cripples.  The report stated that, according to the evidence of Guy Harris, carpenter, and Nicholas Lucas, yeoman, both of Simpson, and “both aged sixty yeares and upwards,” no part of the direct road between Loughton and Fenny Stratford lay in the parish of Woofton.  Further it was shewn, on the evidence of William Leverett, “a skifull surveyor,” that the road from Loughton to Fenny Stratford through Woofton was 5 miles, 2 furlongs, and 20 poles long, whereas the direct road was only 3 miles, 4 furlongs, and 16 poles long.  The justices, therefore, considered that the cripples passing from London to Stony Stratford and back should be conveyed on the direct road to Loughton and should not be diverted through Woofton. The report was confirmed by the Court.  [See p. 16.]

 

p. 121.  Order extending the recognizances of Edward Tudor of London and William Hartshorne of New Windsor, tobacco-pipe makers.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Dorchester, co. Oxford, against a settlement order.

 

Order discharging the recognizance of Roger Curle of Little Brickhill, yeoman, on account of his death.

 

p. 122.  Order estreating the recognizance of William Harris of Edsborough, labourer, for non-appearance in respect of the bastard child of Elizabeth Carne.

 

p. 123.  Orders extending the recognizances of Joseph Gate of Chesham, turner, Tobias Churchill, gentleman, Thomas Bigg of Fulmer, victualler, and William Adams of Quarindon, labourer, and estreating the recognizance of John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher.

 

Order passing the accounts of John Maccascree, gentle- man, “Treasurer for the weekes tax for the Militia.”

 

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Cancellation of the order directing that the overseers of Wendover should pay an allowance to Amy, wife of Gabriel Prentice, who was then in gaol.  [See p. 100.]

 

p. 124.  Orders postponing the imposition of fines upon the owners of land in Westcot, Weston Turvile, Horsendon, Leckhamsted, and Barton Hartshorne, in respect of indict- ments against the parishes for non-repair of highways.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Foskett against a warrant removing Mary Ayres, alias Dennett, from Edgecott.

 

pp. 125-126.  Table, giving rates of wages for “Artificers, labourers, and Servants,” as allowed by the justices.  The rates are exactly similar to those passed at the Easter session, 1687 [see Bucks Sessions Records, Volume I, pages 227- 229], as amended at the Easter session, 1691 [see idem, page 386].

 

p. 127.  Order setting out the rates for carriage of goods, exactly similar to those passed at the Easter session, 1692. [See Bucks Sessions Records, Volume I, page 426.]

 

p. 128.  Order dismissing the appeal of Penn against a warrant removing Adam Heyward, a vagrant, from Wooborne, and adjourning a similar appeal concerning his children.  [See p. 160.]

 

John Edgson of East Burnham to be paid £2 out of the County stock for being “instrumentall in the apprehending of Highwaymen.”  He claimed that he had “hazarded his life in that service and ought to have had the reward which is by law bestowed in that case, but by some indirect meanes the Highwaymen were acquitted.”

 

p. 129.  Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Burnham the following case of Alice, widow of Nathaniel Patee.  Her husband had taken a house at Farnham Royall and had lived in it for eighteen months when a settlement order was obtained, under which he was ordered to be 

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EASTER SESSION, 1695

 

removed to Cowley, co. Middlesex.  The order was not acted upon, and he was subsequently sued for his rent by his landlord, named Mowdy, and, on judgment being obtained against him, was “taken in execution and dyed in Custody,” leaving his wife and child destitute.  The wife then appealed for relief, which was refused her by the overseers of Farnham Royall.

 

Mary, wife of John Suddell, to be paid £2 for clothing provided for Damaris Bright, “a County Child,” and 10s. for a year’s “schooleing,” and Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 7s. 6d. for maintaining for eleven weeks Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, who was born in the gaol.

 

p. 130.  Order quashing the indictments against Thomas Olliffe and William Goldfinch for “selling salt at excessive rates.”

The overseers of Winslow ordered to pay an allowance of 2s. 6d. a week to John Hewett for the maintenance of himself and his six children.

 

Order that “the County allowance to poor prisoners in Goale bee from henceforth reduced to 2d. per diem.”

 

Thomas Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £5 for county business.

 

Memorandum that the following persons “in open Court took the Oathes appointed by the Statute 27 Elizabeth, cap 12”—Thomas Barnwell, gentleman, deputy sheriff, and William Newland, Thomas Hurles, John Johnson, Thomas Read, George Clewer, and William Parker, bailiffs of the three hundreds of Cotteslow, Ashendon, Newport, Aylesbury, Chilterne, and Buckingham respectively.

 

pp. 131—132. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The conviction of Thomas Clements.  [See p. 111.]

The conviction of William Bennett, who withdrew his plea of not guilty, and paid his fine to Mr. Bridges, surveyor of Waddesdon.  [See p. 48.]

 

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The results of the cases against William Blackwell, Francis Goodchild, John Goodchild, and Richard Saunders, indicted at the Midsummer session and tried at this session. [See pp. 2-4.]

William Nash of Beconsfield, farmer, who was indicted at the Epiphany session, 1693-94, for not doing his statutory work on the highways, was tried and found not guilty.

The inhabitants of Horsenden were fined £20 on an indictment, brought at the Midsummer session, 1693, for not repairing Fulling Mill Lane and Bottom Lane, on the highway between Chepping Wycombe and Bisceter, co. Oxford, and were found not guilty on an indictment, brought at the Michaelmas session, 1692, for not repairing part of the road to Haddenham.

 

p. 133. Recognizances extended.

Edward Tudor of London, tobacco-pipe maker, in £20, with William Hartshorne of New Windsor, tobacco-pipe maker, as surety in £10, to appear and answer William Wenlock and John Chamberlain.

The above William Hartshorne in £10, with William Goldhawke of Eaton, meal man, and Andrew Hore of Windsor, blacksmith, as sureties in £5 each, for the like.

The following, already given above: William Adams (p. 104), Samuel Bunce (p. 103), Silvester Lane, Joseph Gate, and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), and Tobias Churchill (p. 76).

 

p. 134. Recognizances entered into.

Mary Bethell of Westcott in Waddesdon, widow, in £10, and John Rogers of Quainton and Thomas Clarke of Grendon Underwood, yeomen, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p. 135. Fines and issues.

John Cranwell junior of Farnham Royall fined £1. 10s. for non-attendance on a jury.

William Harris of Edsborough, labourer, forfeits his recognizance of £20 for non-appearance, and his sureties, John Kent and William Read, both of Broughton, forfeit £10 each.

 

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EASTER SESSION, 1695

 

John Atkinson of Chepping Wycombe, butcher, forfeits his recognizance of £10 for non-appearance.

Edward Porter of Hitcham, labourer, forfeits his recognizance of £40 for non-appearance, and his sureties, Edward Porter of High Wycombe and William Porter of Taplow, labourers, forfeit £20 each.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 131.

 

p. 136. Recognizances discharged.

Richard Gosnold of Woborne, gentleman, Charles Blewitt of Great Marlow, barber-surgeon, William Paltock of Chepping Wycomb, miller, Lawrence Buckney of Soulbury farmer, Richard Saunders, Francis Goodchild, John Goodchild, and Frederick Bowller, all of Princes Risborow, yeomen, William Blackwell of Great Kimbell, yeoman, William Nash of Beconsfield, farmer, Charles Heyward, baker, Henry Clark, cordwainer, and Thomas Woodward, victualler, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Clements, victualler, Thomas Cock senior, bricklayer, and William Larchin, cordwainer, all of Beconsfield, John Potter of Berkhamsted St. Peter, co. Hertford, butcher, Abraham Peacock of Tring, innholder, William Beck senior, cordwainer, Joseph Beck, his son, William Francis Beck, tailor, and Nathaniel Haycroft, cordwainer, all of Woborne, Ralph Goodman, butcher, and William Mead, yeoman, both of Stow, John Willett of Little Horwood, carrier, Hugh Willett of Whaddon, yeoman, John Collett, carrier, and Thomas Janes, yeoman, both of Laighton Bussard, co. Bedford, Marmaduke King and John Cooke, both of Whaddon, yeomen, Roger Curle of Little Brickhill, yeoman, Richard Barton and Henry Curtis, both of Little Horwood, yeomen, George Thorpe and Thomas Dearing, both of Walton in Aylesbury, yeomen, William Moores of Aylesbury, labourer, William Bennett of Waddesdon, yeoman, William Adams of Beconsfield, yeoman, and Christopher Allen of Woborne, farmer.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 137-138.  [Blank.]

 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT CHESHAM

18th July, 1695 [7 William III]

 

p. 139. Jurors for the body of the county.

William Edmonds, gentleman, Richard Greenwood, John Rose, gentleman, James Foster, William Warr, Richard Culverhouse, John Crawley, Joseph Etheridge, Richard Redding, John Young, Richard Sedwin, William Golding, and Nathaniel Weedon, Jonathan Butterfield junior, and William Sheppard, gentlemen.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against John Rogers and Mary Bethell.

William Chase, Thomas Garroway, Nathaniel Birch, James Harding, Thomas Grover, Joseph Smith, Roger Hoare, Thomas Goodson, John Baker, John Kipping, Thomas Hughes, and William Bampton.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the case against Thomas Clarke.

John Collins, John Griffin, Henry Putnam, Joshua Geary, Timothy Butterfield, John Ware, gentleman, John Mead junior, Thomas Butterfield, John Tripp, Benjamin Carter, Nathaniel Child, and Daniel Carter.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 140.  William Cheyne of Draighton Beauchampe, esquire, Richard Heywood of Aylesbury, gentleman, and George Grove, gentleman, and Thomas Welles, carpenter, both of Chepping Wycombe, took the oaths provided in 1 William and Mary, c. 1, and subscribed the declaration against transubstantiation and that contained in 30 Charles II, stat. 2, c 1.

 

p. 141. Indictments.

Abraham Glover of East Burnham, tailor, for assaulting William Goldwin.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1695

 

William Jones, overseer of Farnham Royall, for not obeying a justices’ order to pay £4 to Alice Patee, widow. [Removed by certiorari; see pp. 129 and 195.]

Edward [John] Fastnidge junior of Princes Risborow, yeoman, for building a cottage at Speen without assigning four acres of land.  [Not guilty.]

Francis London of Cublington, victualler, for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury, pewterer, John Temple of Stoke Mandivile, gentleman, and [Ann], his wife, John Hows of Broughton in Bierton, gentleman, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, Sir Edward Longuevile, Bt., of Wool- verton, Peter and William Collingridge, both of Guyhurst, farmers, John Tipper, gentleman, John Mebbee, labourer, and [Ann], his wife, Alice Jones and Mary Goodman, widows, and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Watters, gentleman, all of Muresly, for absence from church.

Jonathan Gurney, Robert Warr, and Christopher Adcock, labourers, John Robinson, victualler, Richard Turpin, tailor, William Pearl and Henry Page, cordwainers, William Hill, gardener, and Mary Tayler, Elizabeth Warr, Mary Robinson, Susan Upton, Mary Upton, and Joan Nelson, spinsters, all of Buckingham, for assaulting John Johnson and John Bunce, bailiffs, and rescuing Anthony Stuchbury, who had been arrested at the suit of Thomas Sheen.

 

p. 142. Presentment of the grand jury.

 

James Wild of Iver for keeping an unlicensed and disorderly alehouse.

The inhabitants of Horsenden for not repairing part of the highway from Bisceter, co. Oxford, to Chepping Wycombe, at a place called Horsenden Pasture.  [Discharged on certificate.]

p. 143. Informations.

William Wade of Turnip End in Princes Risborow, Nicholas Rowe of Stewkly, William Panter of Hanslop, and Thomas Wallington of East Claydon, all labourers, Obadiah Warwick of Whaddon, John Brockson of Cublington, 

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victualler, and Thomas Lever and William Smith, both of Newport Pagnell, butchers, for trading as badgers without licences.

 

p. 144. Presentments of the constables.

The persons indicted above for absence from church, with the addition of Frances Carter, now presented for recusancy.

Edward Edwards of Aylesbury for “refusing to carry Thomas Moreton and Mary, his wife (being cripples), to the next town.”

Richard Saunders of Princes Risborow, farmer, for not repairing, and for enclosing with a hedge and a ditch, part of the highway from Haddenham to Chepping Wycomb, at a place called North Piece.

Joseph White, tailor, Daniel Woton, cordwainer, and Henry Clarke, Robert Cook, and Henry Watson, labourers, all of Bow Brickill, presented by Richard White, constable, for riot and assault.

Ralph Pangburn of Padbury, cordwainer, for “con- tinuing” a cottage.

Simon Harris, gentleman, Richard Davis, labourer, and Godsgift, his wife, John Tomlins, labourer, and Thomas Peele, all of Padbury, for taking hay from the common field, called the Town Hadelands, which belonged to the churchwardens, Matthew Inns and Thomas Godchild, “to- wards the repair of the Church of Padbury.”

Edward Lovejoy of Hedsor in Little Marlow for refusing to watch.

 

p. 145. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Burnham .. .. Henry Goldwin vice Robert Aldridge, and Thomas Woods as tithingman vice John Lacey.

Horton .. .. William Hearn vice Thomas Bowry.

Ludgarshall .. .. William Parker vice Francis Sherley.

Lower Winchenden Francis Dubery vice John Betham.

Wycomb Forrens .. Samuel Gibbs senior vice Christopher Parsons.

 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1695

 

Fenny Stratford . . Nathaniel Ashton vice Thomas Mead.

Orders.

Orders extending the recognizance of Edward Tudor and estreating that of Tobias Churchill of Steeple Claydon.

 

William Hartshorn of New Windsor, tobacco-pipe maker, discharged upon his praying “the benefitt of the Act of this present Parliament Entituled An Act for the King’s most gratious and free pardon.”  [6 and 7 William 111, c. 20.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Edlesborow against a warrant removing William Harris, Elizabeth, his wife, and William, their son, from Bow Brickhill.  [See p. 190.]

 

p. 146.  Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Ashenden the appeal against the poor rate at Brill.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Great Horwood against a warrant removing Henry Grey from Stoney Stratford West Side.

 

p. 147.  Order confirming a warrant removing Charles Bartlett and his family from Chepping Wycombe to Little Marlow.

 

p. 148.  Order that counsel shall attend the Court of King’s Bench to shew cause against the writ of certiorari directed to this Court, requiring that the record of the conviction of Francis and John Goodchild should be transferred to the King’s Bench.  [See p. 4.]

 

The inhabitants of Horsenden discharged of the in- dictments against them for non-repair of the highway at Horsenden Pastures upon producing a justices’ certificate.

 

pp. 149-152.  “Orders and Constitutions made by his Majesties Justices of the Peace for the County of Buck- ingham, in Pursuance of an Act of Parliament made in 

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the last Sessions of this present Parliament, Entituled An Act to prevent Exactions of the Occupyers of Locks and Weares upon the River of Thames Westward and for ascerteyning the Rates of Water Carriages upon the said River.”  [6 and 7 William III, c. 16.]

Ordered:—

1.  “That a Marke bee set above every Lock within this County on this side the village of Bercott towards London at the charge of the tennant or occupyer of every such Lock for the height to which the water ought to be penn’d above every Lock for a Flash if the water can bee raised so high, and that no tennant or occupyer of any Lock or Wear nor any Bargemaster or Bargeman do presume to remove the same.”

2.  Certain justices appointed to “view Hambledon Lock and Marlow Lock . . . and sett the Flash Markes as abovesaid,” and report to the adjourned session.  [See pp. 165- 170.]

3.  The occupiers of all “Locks or Bucks upon the River Isis or Thames . . . on this side of the village of Bercott towards London” shall keep their “Bucks and Buckgates . . . close shutt at all tymes,” except as provided below, and except when “the water in its constant Course bee higher than the Marks sett for a Flash as aforesaid onely liable to bee drawn for the passage of Boates downwards and upwards, which shall bee done in manner and forme following, viz,”

4.  The lock-keepers “after notice given by the Master or Chiefe Boatman of any Boat that any Boat or Boates are goeing down the River from Cleeve with a Flash” shall “draw” their locks, etc., until the boats come to their locks “or Loose their Flash . . ., of which the Master or Chiefe Boatman of the first Boat so Looseing the Flash shall forthwith give notice to the said Lock.”

5.  That no lock-keeper shall “draw” his lock “upon any pretence whatsoever” after the boats coming down with a flash have reached the lock next above his and notice of this has been given by the master of the first boat, except as provided below.

 

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6.  When any boat has come down to a lock with a flash, as provided above, and the water is up to the flash mark, or so near “as the lowness of the water permitt,” and the bargemaster has ordered the lock to be drawn, then, “unless it bee upon a Sunday,” the lock-keeper shall draw his lock and allow it to “lye open” for three hours, between Lady Day and Michaelmas, and for two hours, between Michaelmas and Lady Day, after the boats have shot the lock and for no longer, unless “every of the said downward Boates shall happen to loose their Flash before they come to the next Lock,” in which case the lock- keeper concerned, and the keepers of every other lock “between that and the village of Burcott,” shall immediately shut their locks for another flash.

7.  When the water is so low that it cannot be “penned” up to the mark and a boat has come down to a lock, then the occupier of “every Lock or Mills shall shutt down his Mills for the space of three houres before the Flash bee drawn,” unless the water rises to the mark in less than three hours.

8.  A boat and “sufficient tackle” shall be kept at every lock, and a winch in good repair, “which shall bee made use of by Every Boat in his passage as hath been accustomed.”

9.  In the case of boats coming up stream, the lock-keeper shall “draw” his lock “as soon as required ‘excepting Sundays’,” unless he has had notice of a flash coming down.  When locks “are drawn in Dark nights between the first of November and the first of March for any upward bound Boat,” the lock-keeper’s servant shall be paid 6d. for one boat, and 1s. if there are more boats, to be paid equally by the boats coming up.

10.  The lock-keepers shall keep their locks, etc., in good repair, and shall do all necessary repairs “with such convenient speed and in such manner as may bee least prejudiciall to the Navigation.”

11.  That the bargemasters or their servants shall give due notice “of their Boates coming down with a Flash to all Lock keepers, and notice to the next Lock of the Boates Loosing their Flash.”

 

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12. “That Every Bargemaster shall keep his turn in shoot- ing all Locks and shall not Attempt to gett one before another att the head of any Lock nor runn on ground at any shallow place when the first Boat is on ground to gett turne.”

13. “That noe Downward Boat shall draw any Locks or Bucks before all the Boates that gave notice of the Flash shall come to the Lock, unless notice bee given of their Looseing their Flash as aforesaid.”

14. “That whatsoever Boates shall Lose their Flash shall light out of the way within three dayes after the Flash is lost.”

15. “That no upward bound Boat shall Attempt to Wind any Lock before any Downward Boat shall short it, if they happen to meet at a Lock.”

16. The lock charges for all “locks, Bucks and Winches on this side of the village of Burcott towards London” shall be as follows:—

17. For Hambledon Lock, 3s. 6d. all the year round, “whether there bee occasion for a Flash or not.”

18. Similarly, for Marlow Lock, 3s. all the year round.

 

(signed) William Busby, D. Hampson, Jo. Thurbarne, Edm. Waller, James Chase, Fleetwood Dormer.

 

p. 153.  The surveyors of Little Kymble, Stoke Mandivile, Weston Turvile, and Winslow authorized to raise 6d. rates for the repair of their highways.

 

p. 154.  The inhabitants of Weston Turvile discharged from the indictment against them for the non-repair of a footpath near the Vaches, between Vach Brook and Bedgrove Field, upon their producing a justices’ certificate that the work has now been done.

Sir Thomas Cobb and the inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesdon are similarly discharged from an indictment in respect of certain ditches at Westcott Gap.  [See pp. 2-4.]

 

p. 155.  Order dismissing the appeal of Soulbury against a 

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warrant removing Henry Stevens from Nash in Whaddon. He had been a servant to [blank] Groome at Soulbury.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Ivinghoe against a warrant removing Mary, wife of John Owen, from Cuddington.

 

p. 156.  Adjournment of the appeal of William Adams of Quarendon, labourer, against a maintenance order in respect of the bastard child of Mary Pilgrim of Fleet Marston, singlewoman.  [See p. 216.]

 

p. 157.  Order that William Goodale, “a wandring idle fellow,” shall be detained in the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb until further notice.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Harefield, co. Middlesex, against a warrant removing Richard Lane, with his wife and three children, from the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb.

 

p. 158.  Thomas Mott to be allowed 4s. a week by the overseers of Chesham.

 

William Burrall to be paid £1 out of the County stock He was an old man who claimed “that he was engaged in the late unhappy Civill Warrs and was a souldier under Generall Monk and came under his Command at the Restoration of the late King Charles the Second from Scotland into England, and received severall wounds in the said service.” He asked the Court for a pension, which they were unable to grant, as he had not produced a certificate from any of “the Field Officers of the Regiment wherein hee served . . . as by the Statute is required.”

 

p. 159.  Mr. William Johnson, one of the treasurers, ordered to pay Alexander Oliffe £3. 7s. 6d. for maintaining and cloth- ing Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, for fifteen weeks, and Mr. Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, £10 “for publique services.”

 

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Order allowing the appeal of Dorchester, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing John Clinton, with his wife and children, from Horton.

 

Order extending the recognizances of Samuel Bunce of Chesham, yeoman, Silvester Lane of Dinton, and Thomas Bigg of Fulmer, victualler.

 

p. 160.  Order staying further process against the inhabit- ants of Leckhamsted.

 

The clerk of the peace to be paid 6 marks [£4] “for the statutes made in Parliament since his present Majesties reign which hee hath provided for the use of this Court.”

 

Order discharging the recognizance of Edward Porter of Taplow.

 

Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Penn against a warrant removing the children of Adam Heyward from Woburn.

 

p. 161.  The wife of William Barton of Little Horwood, carpenter, is ordered to be allowed 4s. a week for the maintenance of herself and her four small children.  She had complained that her husband was cruel to her and exposed her “to great want.”  The Court also ordered that “condign punishment” should be given to the husband.  [And see Vol. 5, p. 14.]

 

Edward Porter of Hitcham, labourer, who was bound over to appear at the present session, but only appeared after the grand jury had been discharged, is ordered to be committed to gaol for want of sureties.  His offence was that “hee had insolently assaulted . . . Sir Dennis Hampson by drawing a sword upon him and giving him very provoking and opprobious language.”

 

p. 162.  John Rose and Matthew Annesly, the keepers of Chepping Wycomb and Newport Pagnell bridewells, to be paid their quarter’s salaries of £7. 10s.

 

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The treasurers ordered to have their accounts audited by certain justices.

 

p. 163.  Mr. William Benson, the gaoler, presented a petition to the effect that he might be given some allowance to cover the constant repairs to the gaol and the cost of maintaining “such poor Prisoners as are unable to make him any satisfaction.”  For some twenty years Mr. Birch, the former gaoler, was given an allowance of £20 a year by the sheriff, but this grant had been discontinued sixteen years ago.  The Court appointed a committee of justices to put Benson’s petition before the Rt. Hon. Charles Mountagu, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and to recommend that the annual allowance should be restored.  [See p. 225, and Vol. 5, p. 245.]

 

p. 164.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Aston Rowant, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Elizabeth, Richard, Martha and John, the children of Richard Tripp, from Bledlow, in accordance with the decision of the Lord Chief Justice.  [See p. 15, etc.]

 

pp. 165-170.  The justices appointed above [see pp. 149- 152, para 2] to put the flash marks on Hambledon and Marlow Locks had intended to meet on the 5th August to perform this duty.  But, owing to a misunderstanding, Stephen and James Chase, Edmund Waller, and Henry Gould went to Marlow Lock, whereas Sir Dennis Hampson and Johnshall Crosse went to Hambledon Lock.  The four justices at Marlow set “two spikes of iron, the one fixed by our Direction in the first post of the Campshed on the North East side of Marlow Bridge, and the other fixed in a Pile of the said Bridge in Levell ‘as wee conceive’ to the last mentioned spike ‘or at least to the lowest of the said spikes’.”  They then went on to Hambledon, which they reached at about 6 p.m.

Sir Dennis Hampson had been at Hambledon since 11 a.m. with Johnshall Crosse, and his messages to the other justices had gone astray.  While he was waiting, Sir Dennis “took a Levell with a white willow stick and took the true heighth of the water to the Campshed . . . sufficient to make 

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a flash to carry off any Barge and with little Detriment to the Weares and Locks.  And if the mark had been sett one inch higher ‘notwithstanding twas insisted upon to have it 12 inches’ it would have been great Damage to the Adjacent meadows and to the said Mills and Weares.”  When they arrived, Mr. Waller and Mr. James Chase both disagreed with this point of view, and “Mr. Chase urged that it might bee placed by his Direction alone or hee would not agree to anything.  And [he] tooke an Hammer and knock’d up the spike which the said Sir Denis Hampson and Mr. Cross had fixed, and then attempted to drive a spike himself, which Mr. Cross knock’d off.”  Eventually, “night pressing upon them, [they] parted without any further proceeding as to Hambledon Lock.”

On receiving this report, the Court confirmed the flash marks at Marlow Lock and ordered the same justices, with the exception of Sir Dennis Hampson, to settle the marks at Hambledon.  This they did on the 8th August, when they “sett a flash mark . . . by Driveing a spike of Iron into one of the Piles of the Kempshide of the Winch . . . above a spike formerly driven by the said Sir Denis Hampson.” This mark was confirmed at an adjourned session held at Great Marlow on the 27th August “at the house of the widow Pomfrett, called or known by the name or sign of the three Tunns.”

 

p. 171.  Record that John Hawkes of Aylesbury was convicted, on the evidence of Thomas Fakewood, farrier, under “an Act of this present Parliament Entituled an Act for the more Effectuale suppressing prophane curseing and swearing.”  [6 and 7 William III, c. 11.]

 

Indictments confessed and traversed.

The conviction of Abraham Glover [see p. 141], and the acquittals of John Rogers, Thomas Clarke, and Mary Bethell [see pp. 49-50].

Joseph Gate of Chesham, labourer, appeared in Court, and, “craveing the benefitt of the late generall Act of pardon, was admitted thereunto and discharged.”  [See p. 4.] 

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p. 172. Recognizances extended.

Edward Porter of Hitcham in £10, with Richard Holderness and Thomas Compton, both of Hitcham, husband- men, as sureties in £5 each, to appear and answer for assault- ing Sir Dennis Hampson.

Richard Baldwin of Monks Risborow, carpenter, in £20, and Christopher Faber of Little Kimble, cordwainer, in £10, for the appearance of Sarah, wife of Richard Baldwin.

The following, already given above: Samuel Bunce (p. 103), Silvester Lane and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), William Adams (p. 104), and Edward Tudor (p. 133).

 

p. 173. Recognizance entered into.

William Jones of Farnham Royal in £40 to appear and answer.  [Removed by certiorari.]

 

Fines and issues.

William Adean of Dinton, William Maxwell of Newport Pagnell, gentleman, and William Foddy of Stony Stratford, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

Tobias Churchill of Steeple Claydon, gentleman, forfeits his recognizance of £10 for non-appearance, and William Kefford of Chesham, labourer, similarly forfeits £10 for the non-appearance of his wife.

The fine of Abraham Glover.  [See p. 141.]

 

pp. 174-175. Recognizances discharged.

William Hartshorne of New Windsor, co. Berks, tobacco- pipe maker, William Goldhawk of Eaton, mealman, Andrew Hore of New Windsor, co. Berks, blacksmith, Mary Bethell of Westcott in Waddesdon, widow, John Rogers of Quainton, yeoman, Thomas Clarke of Grendon Underwood, yeoman, Joseph Gate of Chesham, turner, William Clayton, Moses West, Daniel Keen, labourer, and Francis Cox, labourer, all of Eaton near Windsor, William Jones of Farnham Royal, Francis East, Thomas Harding, husbandman, and Matthew Thompson, blacksmith, all of Little Marlow, John Plater, labourer, and Francis London, both of Pightleston, Daniel Keen, John Keen, and Henry Atkins, all of Wingrove, yeomen, 

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John Leaver, pin-maker, William Leaver, pin-maker, and John Colsell, labourer, all of Aylesbury, Richard Baldwin of Monks Risborow, carpenter, Christopher Faber of Little Kimble, cordwainer, Charles Darvill, cordwainer, and William Brookes, yeoman, Sarah Westfield, spinster, John Stevens, Francis Aldridge, Sarah Westfield, infant, and Thomas Oakly, all of Monks Risborow, Thomas Jordan, bargeman, John Church, husbandman, Edward Lovejoy, husbandman, Robert Tyler junior, bargeman, Robert Tyler senior, husbandman, Chistopher Robinson, husbandman, John Ridley, bargeman, Henry Ridley, and John Ridley, all of Little Marlow, Elizabeth Harding, spinster, Ann Meadly, spinster, John Southers, pipe-maker, and John Horwood, butcher, all of Aylesbury, Abraham Glover, tailor, Richard Pond, and David Plumridge, all of East Burnham, Daniel Flatt, husbandman, Theodore Wells, clerk, and William Beck, bargeman, all of Taplow, John Webster, labourer, Isaac Payne, yeoman, and Cadwallader Coker, husbandman, all of Oakley, Joan, wife of William Edmonds, innholder, Joseph Glenister, grocer, and Christopher Studbury, cord- wainer, all of Winslow, Henry Guilman, farmer, William Mayne, yeoman, and Michael Batterson, all of Waddsdon, Charles Coates of Winslow, joiner, Thomas Nash of Quainton, victualler, John Harrison of Winslow, glover, Anthony Bamfield, George Buckingham junior, and Willian Carter junior, all of Little Marlow.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 176-178.  [Blank.]

 

 

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION AT CHEPPING WYCOMBE 10th October, 1695 [7 William III]

 

p. 179. Jurors for the body of the county.

Ambrose Fletcher, Richard Brigginshaw, James Kipping, William Lea, Thomas Walter junior, Thomas Harris, 

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Francis Rogers, Thomas Snow, Edward Nelson, Geoffrey Bampton, William Plater, Thomas Johnson, William King, William Bovingdon, James Herne, John Wilkinson, and Peter Woodward.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

p. 180. Fleetwood Dormer of Aylesbury, esquire, and Edward Marshall, gentleman, mayor of Chepping Wycombe, took the oaths contained in 1 William and Mary, c. 1, and subscribed the declaration against transubstantiation and that contained in 30 Charles 11, stat. 2, c. 1.

Andrew Low of Chepping Wycombe, a teacher of a dissenting congregation, subscribed the latter declaration and that contained in 1 William and Mary, c. 18.

pp. 181-184. Indictments.

Ann, wife of Edward Russell of Long Crendon, labourer, for assaulting Richard Emerton.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Dorothy, wife of Edward Judge of Langley Marish, labourer, for a forcible entry and for assaulting Elizabeth, wife of Leonard Drew.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

The inhabitants of Chalfont St. Giles for not repairing part of the highway leading to Amersham.  [Discharged on certificate.]

John Preston of Long Crendon, labourer, and Elizabeth, his wife, for trading as grocers without due apprenticeship. [Not guilty.]

The inhabitants of Ellesborough for not repairing parts of the road to Banbury, co. Oxford, known as Wood Lane and Bradley Hill.  [Discharged on certificate.]

Roger Cutler, butcher, and Richard Butterfield, husbandman, constables of Iver, for not presenting James Wild and Peter Horton for keeping unlicensed alehouses. [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Thomas Nicholls of Chalfont St. Giles, labourer, for not doing his statutory work on the highways.

Edward Edwards of Aylesbury, labourer, for not obeying a constable's order to convey Thomas Moreton, a poor cripple, to [Blank].  [Discharged; see p. 225.]

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Richard Saunders of Princes Risborow, yeoman, for enclosing part of the highway at North Piece in Horsenden. [Fined 13s. 4d.; and see p. 192.]

Thomas Alexander of Aylesbury, pewterer, John Hows of Broughton in Bierton, gentleman, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, John Temple of Stoke Mandivile, gentleman, and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longuevile, Bt., of Woolver- ton, Peter and William Collingridge, both of Goathurst, alias Guyhurst, farmers, John Mabee, labourer, and Ann, his wife, Mary Goodman, Alice Jones, and Frances Carter, widows, and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Walters, all of Salden in Muresly, for absence from church.

Joseph White, tailor, Daniel Wooton, cordwainer, and Henry Clark, Robert Cook, and Henry Watson, labourers, all of Bow Brickill, for a riotous assembly and for assaulting the constable.  [Discharged.]

Edward Lovejoy of Little Marlow, labourer, for refusing to watch.  [Fined 3s. 4d.].

Simon Harris, gentleman, Richard Davis, labourer, and Godsgift, his wife, John Tomlins, labourer, and Thomas Peele [Neal], all of Padbury, for breaking into certain lands belonging to Matthew Inns and Thomas Goodchild, church- wardens, and held for the repair of the church, and taking away grass to the value of £1.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Ralph Pangburn of Padbury, cordwainer, for “continuing” a cottage.  [Not guilty.]

John Turner of Denham, yeoman, for refusing to be sworn as petty constable.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

p. 185. Informations.

Jeremiah Rolfe of Chepping Wycomb, carrier, Thomas Ransome of Princes Risborow, farmer, and Francis Horne of Newton Longuevile, farmer, for trading as badgers without licences.

Presentments of the highway surveyors.

(Presented by Thomas Kemp and Richard Blount, surveyors.)

Thomas Harding of Cowley in Preston Bissett and 

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John Webb of Twyford for not repairing a footbridge on the road between Buckingham and Oxford.

George Grizell of Maidsmorton and John Clark of Akeley for not repairing Kingstrop Lane on the road from Buckingham to Torcester, co. Northampton.

William Gibbs of Akeley for working on the highways with one, instead of with two, teams in respect of his holding of two ploughlands.

John Clark of Akeley for not sending his team for work on the highways.

p. 186. Presentments of the constables.

The persons indicted above for absence from church, with the exception of Peter and William Collingridge, and the addition of John Tipper of Salden in Muresly and [Mary], his wife, are presented for recusancy.

William Garrett, constable of Hanslopp, for not bringing in his quarteridge money to John Matthew, chief constable for Newport.

Peter Horton and James Wild, both of Iver, and William Martin and Arthur Taylor, both of Great Marlow, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

Robert Beckford and Jeremiah Harman, both of Great Marlow, for refusing to watch.

p. 187. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Woburne . . . . Jasper Heaward and Richard Spratley vice Richard Burcott and William Banburey, and James Fretwell and Amos Sparrow as tithingmen vice William Natt and Francis Andrews.

Town of ChalfontSt. Giles . . . . Charles Piercy vice William Cocke.

Parish of ChalfontSt. Giles . . . . Thomas Hill vice James Body.

Penn . . . . Thomas Wilkinson vice Christopher Bovington, and John Blick as tithing- man vice William Hancock.

Parish of Penn . . Thomas Abby as tithingman vice Ralph Pusie.

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Notty Green and Forty Green  John Salter senior as tithingman vice Jepthah Hornblow.

Weston Turvile . . William Fleet and Thomas Pauly vice William Brown and John Turner.

Saunderton . . Philip Hillyer vice Henry Allen.

East Burnham . . Edward Pond vice John Styles.

Aylesbury . . . . Elisha Perine and John Pratt, baker, vice Charles Noy and [blank] Higgins.

Fingest . . . . John Bowyer vice William Tyler.

Orders.

p. 188.  Order extending the recognizances of the following, with their sureties: Thomas Underwood of Little Horwood, labourer, Thomas True of Amersham, Matthew Stephens of Wendover, butcher, Richard Baldwin of Monks Risborow, carpenter, Christopher Faber of Little Kymble, cordwainer, Silvester Lane of Dynton, victualler, Thomas Bigg of Fulmer, victualler, and Edward Tudor of London, tobacco-pipe maker.

Edward Reddall, who was committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb for taking a pair of shoes “and other small things” from the mansion house of Edward Nicholas, esquire, at Hitcham, is ordered to be discharged as there was no prosecutor.

p. 189.  Order extending the recognizance of Samuel Bunce and his surety, John Tokefield.

The inhabitants of Leckhamsted discharged from two indictments in respect of part of the road from Whittlebury, co. Northampton, to Winslow, and part of the road from Akely to Stony Stratford, upon producing certificates that the work has now been done.

p. 190.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Edles- borough against a warrant removing William Harris, Elizabeth, his wife, and William, their son, from Bow Brickhill.

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Adjournment of the appeal of Buckingham against a warrant removing the son of Mary Rogers from Stowe. [See pp. 218-219.]

p. 191.  Order dismissing the appeal of Redborne against a warrant removing John Owen from Ivingho.

Further adjournment of the appeal of William Adams against a maintenance order.  [See pp. 156, 216, 241.]

p. 192.  Order reducing the allowance to be paid to Elizabeth Ussill by the overseers of Brill from 3s. to 2s. 6d. a week. [See p. 32.]

At the present session, Richard Saunders of Prince Risborough, yeoman, was fined 13s. 4d. for enclosing part of the highway of Horsenden, at a place called North Piece, by making a hedge and a ditch.  The sheriff is, therefore, ordered to “pull up the said Enclosure and totally remove the said Nusance by laying out the said Way as antiently of right the same ought to be.”

p. 193.  The surveyors of Abbots Aston authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

p. 194.  Order staying further process against the inhabitants of Horsenden for non-repair of highways.

p. 195.  At the Easter Session, Alice Patee of Farnham Royall, widow, appealed to the Court for relief, and her case was submitted to the justices for the hundred of Burnham [See p. 129].  The decision of these justices was that the overseers of the parish should pay her £4, but their order was not obeyed, and William Jones, one of the over- seers, was indicted at the last session for refusing to pay this relief.  He pleaded not guilty and was committed for trial at the present session, but obtained a writ of certiorari removing the case to the King’s Bench at Westminster [See p. 141].  As it appears to the Court that Alice Patee is too poor to prosecute the indictment at Westminster and that 

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William Jones and the other overseers of the parish, “Con- federates with him”, may take advantage of this “and thereby weary and discourage the said Alice Patee . . . contrary to Justice and likely to be in ill Example to Offenders in like Cases,” it is ordered that the clerk of the peace shall take over the conduct of the case at the charge of the County.  [And see p. 258.]

p. 196.  Judith Chest, widow, daughter of the late Richard Hinton, to be paid 10s. out of the County funds.

Andrew Miller of Chepping Wycomb, apothecary, who claimed “that he served his late Majestie King Charles the second in the severall Regiments of the Lord Mordaunt and Earl of Cleveland and under the severall Commands of Captain Baron and Captain Bridges,” asked to be admitted to a life pension in place of the late Richard Hynton, on account of his poverty.  Although the Court had “received a very favorable Character “of him, they were not able to grant his request, as he had not produced “any Certificate from his Officers . . . as by Law required.”  But they granted him £2 for his immediate needs, and gave him leave to petition again with the required certificate.

p. 197.  Mr. Thomas Kidgell, one of the treasurers, ordered to pay William Benson, the gaoler, £7. 15s. for money spent on repairing” the decayes and breaches in his Goal”

Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 12s. for “nurseing and schooling” Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield, for twelve weeks.

Nathan Fryer and Thomas Stannaway to be allowed 1s. a week each by the overseers of West Wycomb.

Mr. Thomas Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid 20 marks [£13. 6s. 8d.] “for publique service.”

p. 198.  Convictions of swearers.

(In accordance with the act of 6 and 7 William III, c. 11.) John Clerke of Wendover, innkeeper, on the evidence

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of Robert Beeson of Wendover, bricklayer, for four oaths. [Fined 8s.]

Anthony Davis of Brill, farmer, for three oaths. [Fined 12s.]

Ann, wife of Edward Russell of Long Crendon, on the evidence of Richard Emerton of the same, maltster, for two oaths, after a former conviction.  [Fined 7s.]

The following were all fined 2s. for one oath:

John Wilmot of Brill, butcher; Rebecca Wakeman of Aylesbury, on the evidence of Elizabeth Heyley; George Thorpe of Fleet Marston and Henry Salter of Colchester, co. Essex, attorney-at-law, both on the evidence of Thomas Sheene of Aylesbury; William Edmunds of Aylesbury, on the evidence of his servant, Thomas Bigg; John Shrews- bury of St. Giles in the Fields, co. Middlesex, on the evidence of Thomas Lidwell; Francis Wright of Great Marlow, on the evidence of Margaret Rye; Thomas Edis, labourer, and Andrew Dominick, gentleman, both of Great Marlow, on the evidence of Stephen Chase, esquire.

p. 199.  Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Ann Russell, Dorothy Judge, and Richard Saunders.  [See pp. 181-184.]

p. 200.  Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: Richard Baldwin and Christopher Faber (p. I72), Silvester Lane and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), William Adams (p. 104), and Edward Tudor (p. 133).

Thomas Underwood of Little Horwood, labourer, in £20, with Henry Edlyn of the same, gentleman, as surety in £10, to keep the peace towards James Footman.

Thomas True of Amersham in £10, with Francis Payne of the same as surety in £5, for his good behaviour.

Matthew Stephens of Wendover, butcher, in £10, with Richard Munday, blacksmith, and Thomas Stevens, butcher, both of the same, as sureties in £5 each, to keep the peace towards Elizabeth Clark.

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William Meredue of Sippenham and Richard Jones of Beconsfield, yeoman, as sureties in £20 each for the appearance of William Jones to answer an indictment in the King’s Bench at Westminster.

Edward Fastnidge of Princes Risborow, yeoman, in £40 to appear and answer.

 

p. 201.  Fines and issues.

Matthias Medwin of Marlow and John Parratt of Loughton fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 199.

 

pp. 202-203. Recognizances discharged.

Edward Porter, and Richard Holderness and Thomas Compton, husbandmen, all of Hitcham, John Bishop of Caldecott in Bow Brickhill, miller, Nathaniel Aston, husband- man, and Thomas Hebbs, cordwainer, both of the Blechley side of Fenny Stratford, Elizabeth Clark, spinster, and John Clark and Thomas Welch, labourers, all of Wendover, Hugh Keen of Great Missenden, blacksmith, John Plumridge of West Wycomb, brick-maker, John Bennet of Great Missenden, cordwainer, Elizabeth Stevens, widow, Matthew Stevens and Thomas Stephens, butchers, and Roger West, tailor, all of Wendover, Edward Trigg of Iver, miller, Edward Judge of Langley, farmer, and Dorothy, his wife, John Ellins and Mary, his daughter, Richard Smith, “hoop-shaver,” Thomas Guyatt, farmer, and William Manfield, all of Iver, Anthony Holton, paper-maker, and Thomas Warner, labourer, both of Great Brick- hill, Thomas Turpin of Horton, yeoman, Francis Collins, labourer, Richard Collins, farmer, and Francis Winslow, yeoman, all of Shipton Lee in Quainton, Anthony Davis, farmer, Henry Griffin, yeoman, and Thomas Townsen, wheelwright, all of Brill, Adam Blackwell, labourer, and Nicholas Hewes, Thomas Lamborne, and James Shipton, farmers, all of Charndon in Twyford, William Porter of Taplow, yeoman, Alexander Olliff of Aylesbury, labourer, Thomas Boneham of Charndon, herdsman, Richard Emerton, senior, and Robert Slaymaker, maltsters, and Thomas 

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Heath, smith, all of Long Crendon, Charles Noy of Aylesbury, “leather bodice maker,” Elizabeth Drewe of Langley Marish, Matthew Ashby, John Day, Alice Plunkett, and Robert Wood, farmer, all of Agmundisham, Christopher Green of Long Crendon, yeoman, Henry Larimore of Chilton, labourer, Ann, wife of William Russell of Long Crendon, John Dean and Ralph Dean, harness-makers, and John Davis, brass-worker, all of Chepping Wycomb, John Floyd of Hambledon, butcher, James Fish of Great Marlow, brewer, John Rockall of Hambledon, yeoman, Henry Nicholls senior, labourer, William Horwood, blacksmith, and Edward Edwards, husbandman, all of Aylesbury, and John Estall, farmer, and William Estall, yeoman, both of Lavendon.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 204.  [Blank.]

 

 

 

EPIPHANY SESSION

AT AYLESBURY

16th January, 1695-96 [7 William III]

 

p. 205.  Jurors for the body of the county.

Nathaniel Birch, gentleman, Thomas Monck, William Hill, Joseph Rose, John Hill, John Kipping, Thomas Reynolds, John Beck, William Bampton, John Mason, William Greaves, Thomas Gibbs, Thomas Dudley, John Kidgell, gentleman, Francis Seabrooke, John Ware, gentle- man, Henry Newell, William Sheppard, and John Scriven.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the case against Edward Fastnidge.

William Edmonds, Thomas Ray, Peter Goldsworth, John Goldsworth, Alexander Dover, Joseph Bampton, Thomas Barnaby, John Symonds, John Bennell, Robert Streame, William Scott, and Ralph Rice.

(signed) Hugh Horton, esquire, sheriff.

 

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p. 206.  Richard Jarvise of Newport Pagnell, tailor, and Richard Freeman of Warrendon in Oldney, labourer, took the oaths and subscribed the declarations for Dissenters contained in the acts of 1 William and Mary, c. 1, and c. 18, and Benjamin Gatton of Aylesbury, gentleman, conformed to the latter act.

 

p. 207.  Memorandum that the following houses were registered as meeting houses for Dissenters under the act of I William and Mary, c. 18—the houses of Thomas Watts of Castle Thrupp, Mark Travell of Hanslopp, and Elizabeth Warren, widow, of Leckhamsted.

 

pp. 208-210. Indictments.

The inhabitants of Woolverton for not repairing part of the road from Stoney Stratford to Newport Pagnell. John Johnson prosecuted.  [Discharged on certificate.]

Richard Webb of Brill, labourer, for trading as a baker without due apprenticeship.  William Lester and George Harris prosecuted.  [Not guilty.]

John Darvall of Princes Risborough, yeoman, for not keeping watch.  Nicholas Hatchman prosecuted.

William Gyles of Winslowe, gentleman, for obstructing the road to Adstock, at a place called The Pickles, by making a ditch and a hedge.  John Seaton and Joseph Glenister prosecuted.

William Garrett, constable of Hanslopp, for not giving in his quarteridge money or his list of presentments to the chief constable.  John Matthews, chief constable for Newport, prosecuted.

Peter Horton and James Wild, both of Iver, and Daniel Fretwell, William Martin, and Arthur Tayler, all of Great Marlow, labourers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses;  and Fretwell also for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

Robert Beckford and Jeremiah Harmon, both of Great Marlow, labourers, for not keeping watch.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Thomas Harding of Cowley in Preston Bissett and John Webb of Twyford, yeoman, for not repairing a foot- 

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bridge on the road from Buckingham to Oxford.  John Chilton, surveyor of Twyford, prosecuted.  [Discharged on certificate.]

John Clark of Akely, farmer, for not sending a team for the repair of the highways in respect of one plough land. Thomas Kemp and Richard Blount, surveyors of Akely, prosecuted.

William Gibbs of the same, farmer, for the same offence in respect of two plough lands.  The same persons pro- secuted.  [Not guilty.]

George Grizell of Maids Morton and John Clarke of Akely, yeomen, for not repairing Kingstrupp Lane on the road from Maids Morton to Buckingham.  The surveyors of Akely prosecuted.

Edward Fastnidge junior of Princes Risborough, yeo- man, for building a cottage without assigning four acres of land.  [Not guilty.]

 

p.  211.  Presentments of the grand jury.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, John Temple and [Ann], his wife, William and Peter Collingridge, Sir Edward Longvile, Bt., John Tipper and [Mary], his wife, Mary Goodman, Alice Jones, Frances Carter, John Maby and [Ann], his wife, Dorothy Waters, and Joseph Fletcher of Weston Underwood, labourer, for absence from church.*

 

Presentments of the constables.

The persons presented above for absence from church are now prosecuted for recusancy.

John Darvall of Darvall’s Hill in Princes Risborough, farmer, for refusing to watch when called on by Nicholas Hatchman, the constable.

William Field of North Crawley for selling beer without a licence.

Peter Horton of Iver for selling beer without a licence and

 

Note.—The residences and professions of all but the last of the above persons have been given frequently in the previous sessions, so will be omitted in future.

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“for haveing a Bastard Child in the Parish and the mother of it run away.”

James Gayler of Denham for “lodging of Vagabonds.”

Nathaniel Child and Thomas Yarrow, both of Amersham, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

 

p.  212. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Hulcott . . . . John Muston vice William Smith.

Ford . . . . John Saunders vice John Dover.

Buckland . . . . Thomas Worster vice [Thomas Wright].

Newport hundred—

Newport Pagnell. . Henry Finimore vice Thomas Ingram.

Broughton . . . . Lawrence Smith vice John Kent.

Wavendon . . . . Thomas Browne vice James Allen.

Clifton . . . . James Laughton vice Thomas Stubbs.

Cottesloe hundred-

Wing . . . . John Cripps and Francis Miller vice Robert Fincher and John Munday.

Burnham hundred—

East Burnham . . Henry Ball of Britwell vice John Styles.

Boveney . . . . Thomas Finch vice John Batting, and Ralph Wesson as tithingman vice William Butler.

Orders.

p. 213.  Order staying further proceedings against the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Gyles for non-repair of a highway.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of North Crawley against a warrant removing Thomas Burton, with his wife and child, from Shenley.  [See p. 247.]

 

p. 214.  Order referring the rating appeals of Mr. Thomas Machell of Wendover and Mr. Pelser of Wooborne to the justices for the hundreds of Aylesbury and Chiltern respectively.

 

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p. 215.  The surveyors of Winslow authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

pp. 216-217.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of William Adams of Quarrendon, labourer, against a maintenance order in respect of the bastard child of Mary Pilgrim, now the wife of Richard Collins.  Adams was ordered to pay 12s. and costs and 2s. a week to John Ivatts, overseer of Fleet Marston.  [And see p. 241.]

 

pp. 2l8-219.  Order referring to the Judges at the Assizes the adjourned appeal of Buckingham against a warrant removing Richard, son of Mary Rogers, from Stow.  The father, John Rogers, was a settled inhabitant of Stow and married there, but later went to Buckingham, where his son was born, in 1694.  The father then “went for a souldier,” and is now “dead or beyond the seas.”  The mother and son were later removed to Stow by an order of the Sessions at Buckingham, held “by Speciall Commission,” against which Stow unsuccessfully appealed to the King’s Bench.  Last year Stow obtained a justices’ order for the return of the child to Buckingham, which order is the object of the present appeal.

 

p. 220.  Adjournment of the appeal of Penn against a warrant settling John Moody in the parish.  [See p. 256.]

 

Order confirming a warrant removing Henry Pratt and Mary, his wife, from Great Kimble to Chearsley.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Aston Clinton against a warrant removing Thomas Fountain from Wendover.

 

p. 221.  Order confirming a warrant removing Matthew Sherred from Soulbury to Wing.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Mentmore against a warrant removing Elizabeth Anderson from Soulbury. Certain points in the case are referred to the justices for the hundreds of Cottesloe and Aylesbury, and especially the 

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question as to whether the house of Richard Shockley of Broughcott lies in the parish of Grove or the parish of Mentmore.  [See p. 319.]

 

p. 222.  George Hunt petitioned the Court on behalf of the inhabitants of Brill that certain children, over the age of seven, whose parents are not thought able to maintain them, might be apprenticed according to the form of the statute [43 Elizabeth, c. 2].  It is ordered that certain justices shall supervize the apprenticing of the children by the overseers and churchwardens, at the charge of the parish, “as soon as conveniently they can dispose them to persons fitt to receive and instruct them in Husbandry and Houswifry.”  The names of the children were: John and Ann, children of Rebecca Turner, widow; Elizabeth and William, children of William Russell; Joan, daughter of William Durvall; Elizabeth, grand-daughter of [Blank] Everett, widow.

 

p. 223.  Order extending the recognizance of William Adams

and his sureties.

 

Adjournment of the case against John Webb of Twiford and Thomas Harding of Cowley.

 

Order staying further proceedings against the inhabitants of Ellesborough.

 

Rose Roberts of Swanborn, and late of Oldwick, widow, to be allowed £1. 10s. a quarter out of the County stock until further order.  Her petition, on account of “great age and infirmityes,” was supported by the Rev. John Pilkinton, vicar of Swanborn.

 

p. 224.  Certain prisoners in the County gaol petitioned for an increase in their allowance of 2d. a day, “by reason of the dearness of Corne.”  An increase of 1d. a day was granted. The names of the prisoners were: Thomas Winslow, John Matthews, Henry Travell, George Clark, Richard Saunders, John Hind, John Savill, Robert Wych, Robert Webb, Joseph Stream, and George Stream.

 

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Edward Billington of Cublington, labourer, to be paid £2 out of the County stock.  He stated “that in his Majesties service in Flanders, at the siege of Namur in the Regiment of Collonell Coultroup, he received a shott in his right Arme, whereby he was . . . disabled to serve his Majesty.”

 

p. 225.  Jeremiah Gallant of Great Missendon admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He claimed that “haveing been a souldier under the Command of the Captain Generall of the Forces of his late Majestie King Charles the second upon the 25th Aprill, 1660, and he haveing taken the Oath of Supremacy and Allegiance to his said late Majestie,” he had “not afterwards deserted his said service.”  His claim was supported by certificates from Major Thomas Johnson, Captain Thomas Simnell, and Lieutenant Thomas Roper, ”Officers of his Excellencyes the late Duke of Albermarles [Regiment] of Horse.”

 

The thanks of the Court are warmly expressed to the Rt. Hon. Thomas Wharton, Comptroller of the Household, etc., for his success in presenting to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the petition of Mr. William Benson, the gaoler, that his annual salary of £20 might be restored.  [See p. 163.]

 

p. 226.  Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 15s. for fourteen weeks maintenance of Alice, daughter of Catherine Maxfield.

 

Thomas Andrew to be allowed 1s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Bierton.

 

Mr. Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £5 for work done.

 

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s.

 

p. 227. Indictments confessed and traversed.

John [Edward] Fastnidge found not guilty.  [See p. 141.]

 

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Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Adams (p. 104), Richard Baldwin and Christopher Faber (p. 172), Silvester Lane and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), Edward Tudor (p. 133), Thomas Underwood, Thomas True and Matthew Stephens (p. 200).

 

p. 228.  Recognizances entered into.

John Preston of Long Crendon, labourer, in £40 for the appearance of himself and his wife, Elizabeth.

Ralph Pangborne, cordwainer, Simon Harris, gentleman, Richard Davis, labourer, and John Tomlyns, labourer, all of Padbury, and William Gibbs of Akely in £40 each to appear and answer.  And Davis in £40 for the appearance of Godsgift, his wife.

 

p. 229.  Fines and issues.

William Veerey, gentleman, and James Rose, both of Cuddington, and Thomas Hillesden of Padbury, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

 

Recognizances discharged.

John [Edward] Fastnidge junior, of Princes Risborough, yeoman, Robert Trott of East Burnham, farmer, Edward Mason of Cippenham, yeoman, William Row senior, William Row junior, and Thomas Parker, all of Aston Clynton, Richard Collins of Waddesden, labourer, John Inwood of Stewkly, wheelwright, Thomas Saunders of Wing, bricklayer, William Smith of Wood End, labourer, Benjamin Smith of Brill, grazier, John Freeman of Hambleden, husbandman, Thomas Wilkinson of St. Giles in the Fields, co. Middlesex, linen-draper, Alexander Olliff, labourer, and Richard Wright, glover, both of Aylesbury, Daniel Dodson, cordwainer, and Michael Green, baker, both of Brill, Benjamin Goldar of Brackley, co. Northampton, gentleman, George Floyd of Farnham Royall, farmer, Robert James of Hurley, co. Berks, and Richard Baker of Brill, blacksmith.

 

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End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 230.  [Blank].

 

 

EASTER SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

23rd April, 1696 [8 William III]

 

p. 231.  Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Lake, gentleman, Thomas Barnaby, Thomas Ray senior, Thomas Piddington, John Reynor, James Reynolds, Richard Hunt, John Griffen, Ralph Rice, Thomas Davey, Richard Waddupp, James Styles, Thomas Grover, John Theed, Ralph Stone, Thomas Bowry, and William Illing.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against John Preston, Simon Harris, William Gibbs, and Ralph Pangborne.

Matthew Huntley, gentleman, William Chase, Henry Putnam, Thomas Barrowby, John Plomer, Jeremiah Sexton, Francis Ingby, William Turner, William Sparks, William Fryer, Jeremiah Francis, and Henry Hoare.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 232.  The following officials took the statutory oaths: Thomas Barnwell of Aylesbury, gentleman, deputy sheriff, Matthew Pettifer and Thomas Wells, bailiffs of the borough of Chepping Wycomb, and William Cheyne of Drayton Beauchamp, esquire.

 

Samuel Campion of Oldney, cordwainer, took the oaths, etc., as a Dissenter.

 

p. 233.  Memorandum that the houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses for Dissenters under the act of I William and Mary, c. 18: James Clements of Hanslopp, Samuel Campion of Oldney, Philip Wingfield of  

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Flackwell Heath in Chepping Wycomb, and a barn belonging to the last-named.

 

p. 234.  The following bailiffs of hundreds took the oath prescribed in the act of 27 Elizabeth, c. 12: Thomas Read, John Johnson, William Parker, William Newland, Thomas Hurles, and James Hassell.

 

William Franklyn of Shipton Lee in Quainton, labourer, fined 1s. for swearing one oath.

 

Indictments.

James Gayler of Denham, yeoman, for harbouring vagrants.  [Fined 10s.]

Peter Horton of Iver and William Field of North Crawley, labourers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

John Tipper and [Mary], his wife, Mary Goodman, John Maby and [Ann], his wife, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Alexander, John Temple and [Ann], his wife, John Howes, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, William and Peter Collingridge, and Sir Edward Longvile, Bt., for absence from church.  [See note on page 71.]

 

p. 235  Presentments of the grand jury.

The persons indicted above for absence from church are presented for recusancy.

 

p. 236  Presentments of the constables.

The persons indicted above for absence from church are presented for recusancy, and the following names added: Thomas Crumpton, esquire, Mary Bringhurst, widow, John Bringhurst, gentleman, Richard Barnes, and Mary Barnes, widow, all of “Forinfee” in Great Marlow.

John Rivett of Newport Pagnall, butcher, for selling unwholesome meat.

Peter Horton of lver for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

William Church of Hedsor in Little Marlow for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

 

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p. 237.  Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . . . John Strong of Great Missenden and James Smith of Ellesborough vice Thomas Bampton and John Darvall.

Newport . . . . Thomas Rider of Newport Pagnell, gentleman, and Peter Woodward of Stoke Hamond vice John Matthew and George Dudley.

Buckingham . . John Mason of Marsh Gibbon, gentle- man, and Matthew Adams of Thorn- borough vice John Warr and John Tayler.

Cottesloe . . Henry Adkins of Northall in Edles- borough and George Stone of Cub- lington vice Joseph Gurney and Thomas Harris.

Ashenden . . . . Robert Mayne of Quarrendon and John Bampton of Ashenden, gentlemen, vice Thomas Milward and William Tipping.

Stoke . . . . George Randall of Wexham and John Aldridge of Eaton vice John Nicholas and Thomas Raynor.

Desborough . . William Blundell of Medmenham and Thomas Ryman of West Wycomb vice Henry Franklyn and Daniel Kingham.

Burnham . . . . Timothy Harding of Amersham and Swithin Butterfield of Chalfont St. Peters vice James Norwood and John Lee, gentleman.

 

Treasurers sworn.

 

For the King’s Bench and Marshalsea  Robert Jane of Horton and William Widmer of Wycomb Forrens, gentlemen, vice William Johnson and John Ferrers, gentlemen.

For the maimed soldiers  Thomas Ashwell of Edlesborough and  Thomas Gibson of Little Kimbell,

 

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gentlemen, vice Thomas Kidgell and John Bigg, gentlemen.

 

pp. 238-239  Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Bishopstone . . John Dalafield vice William Wright.

Brands Fee . . Moses Puttenham vice Thomas Morton, and Thomas Staple as tithingman vice Nathaniel Deane.

Bierton . . . . John Hicks vice Thomas Monke.

Broughton . . . . Thomas Jordan vice Robert Dover.

Cuddington . . Charles Fitch vice John Cox.

Dynton . . . . Henry Gosse vice Richard Smalbrook.

Ellesborough . . William Reynolds and Henry Cleydon vice William Allen and John Prince.

Halton . . . . Thomas Turpin vice John Tomson.

Great Kimbell . . Thomas Humphrey vice Edward Smyth.

Great Missenden . . William Aldridge and John Bennett vice John Bennett and John Saunders, and Matthew Clay as tithingman vice [blank] Sweetser.

Little Missenden . . John Cock vice Thomas Axtell.

Monks Risborough John Smith vice Richard Beddall.

Walton in Aylesbury  Thomas Bigg senior vice John Cutler.

Newport hundred—

Astwood . . . . Thomas Sheffield vice John Cox.

Bradwell . . . . Edward Sewell vice William Polter.

Cole Brafield . . Henry Stubbs vice John Keepe.

Bletchley . . . . William Heames vice John Phillips.

Little Brickhill . . William Sinfield vice John Smyth, and George Gosley as tithingman vice John Ping.

North Crawley . . Clement Calcott and William Day vice John Darnell and John Glydall.

Clifton Reynes . . Thomas Vesey vice James Layton.

Chicheley . . . . Edward Richardson vice John Sharpe.

Calverton . . Thomas Watkins vice Thomas Esman.

Water Eaton . . Thomas Stratton vice William King.

 

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Hanslopp . . . . Richard Hilliar vice William Garrett.

Middleton Keynes Samuel Porter vice Jonathan Abbott.

Lavendon . . . . John Button and John Barnes vice William Estoll and [Edward Pem- berton].

Great Lynford . . James England vice Thomas Cook.

Sherrington . . Thomas Lucas vice Anthony Lightman.

Simpson . . . . Richard Webb vice John Goodman.

Stoney Stratford . . John Parratt and Gregory Browne vice Anthony Forfitt and Thomas Browne.

Little Woolstone . . Daniel Allison vice William Edmunds.

Buckingham hundred—

Leckhamstedd . . John Denzey vice Francis Church.

Cottesloe hundred—

Abbotts Aston . . John Bavin and John Betham vice William Woodward and Thomas Mildmer.

Cublington . . James Gardner vice Francis London.

Cheddington . . James Tanner vice Edward Newens.

Drayton Parslow . . John Cooke vice Richard Chandler senior.

Muresly . . . . William Stevens and Thomas Wood- ward vice George Bayley and John Hall.

Mentmore . . . . Isaac Stone and Thomas Elliard vice Solomon Hoddy and John Saunders.

Soulbury . . John Hall vice John Tayler.

Swanburn . . . . William King and Jonas Smith vice John Carter and Edward Bond.

Stewkley . . . . Thomas Shilborne vice Thomas Bull.

Stoke Hamond . . Thomas Fowler and Richard Fountain vice William Bishopp and John Cooke.

Ashenden hundred—

Chilton . . . . Richard Morton vice Robert Green.

North Marston . . Edward Oviatts and John Cox vice James Foster and Thomas Reeve.

Oveing . . . . William Foster vice John Hilsden.

Shipton Lee . . Francis Winslow vice Richard Morgan.

Studley . . . . Robert Saunders vice Richard Coates.

Waddesden . . William Mayne junior and Thomas

 

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Matthew vice Thomas Allen and Michael Batterson.

Westcott . . Thomas Cripps senior vice John Beck.

Wornall . . . . John Tipping vice Richard Stevens.

Stoke hundred—

Denham . . . . John Thompson vice John Turner.

Eaton Town . . John Cooper vice Henry Chilton.

Eaton, The Gildables  John Tomson vice Simon Buck, and  Robert Randall and William Smith as tithingmen vice John Piper and   William Field.

Horton . . . . George Smith and Thomas Biddle vice William Hearne and William Finch.

Wexham . . . . John Roberts vice Thomas Lovejoy.

Desburrow hundred—

Chawley in Braddenham  Robert Morris vice Thomas Sharpe.

 

Radnage . . . . Henry White vice Daniel Chapman.

West Wycombe . . Robert Lane and Joseph Burnham vice Thomas Wheeler and Robert Hobbs.

Burnham hundred—

Cheynes . . . . Edward Seagrave vice James Wingfield.

Beconsfield . . William Grove and William Woodhouse vice Elias Birt and John Grove, and Thomas Hare and Edward Hare as tithingmen vice Richard Rowlinson and John Preston.

Dorney . . . . John Arden vice Thomas Goodchild.

Hitcham . . . . Christopher Williamson vice Thomas Compton.

Taplowe . . . . George Andrews vice Richard Walker.

 

p. 240.  Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, was fined £2 for refusing to take the oaths contained in I William and Mary, c. 8.  The money was paid to the overseers of Dorney for the relief of the poor.

 

Orders.

p. 241.  Adjournment of the appeal of William Adams to be 

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discharged from a maintenance order, on the ground that the child has since died at Quainton.  [See pp. 216-217.]

 

p. 242.  Certain of the inhabitants of Amersham complained that three persons had been irregularly appointed as overseers of the parish and that one of them was “not of Ability to serve.”  The Court confirmed the appointments and ordered the persons concerned to act as overseers until the next session.  But, in the meantime, certain justices were appointed to enquire into the matter and to report at the next session.

 

Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s.

 

p. 243.  Upon hearing of the death of Michael Read, bride- well-keeper at Aylesbury, the Court considered the question of his successor.  Applications to fill the vacancy had been received from Henry Munday and John Christmass senior, both of Aylesbury.  The Court stated that they were “well satisfied that the said John Christmass hath in his station been very usefull and serviceable to this present Government at his great charge and with some misfortunes in his family and dealings in the world is become very much in debt and reduced to a very low condition and hath by the former meritted the compassion and Bounty of this Government as a reward for his Affection thereunto.”  Therefore, “as an Incouragement to others to be industrious for the support thereof,” they ordered that whoever was appointed as the new bridewell-keeper should allow Christmas £10 a year out of his salary of £30.  This Henry Munday agreed to do, under penalty of £100, and he was forthwith sworn into his new office.

 

p. 244.  John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his quarter’s salary of £7. 10s.

 

Further adjournment of the appeal of Mentmore against a settlement order.  [See pp. 221 and 318.]

 

p. 245.  “Forasmuch as divers disputes and Quarrells have 

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of late years happened” concerning the repair of the highways at Horsenden, it has now been agreed between all parties concerned, and confirmed by the Court, that in future all such repairs shall be done at the charge of the parish, and that all the owners of adjacent lands shall be “exonerated and discharged” from any indictments against them in this connection.

 

Adjournment of the case against the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Gyles for non-repair of highways.

 

p. 246.  Mary Carter, alias Edmunds, who was committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb for refusing to indemnify the parish of Great Marlow, is ordered to be released.

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Newport the dispute between Moulsoe and Broughton as to “the most commodious and fitt wayes for conveying of Cripples from the one parish to the other.”

 

p. 247.  Thomas Harding of Cowley in Preston Bissett and John Webb of Twyford discharged from an indictment for non-repair of a footbridge at Cowley, upon producing a certificate that the work has been done.  [See pp. 208-210.]

 

Order allowing the adjourned appeal of North Crawley against a warrant removing Thomas Burton, with his wife and child, from Shenley.  A certificate was produced by the rector of Shenley, the Rev. John Jauncey, that Burton was a settled inhabitant there.

 

p. 248.  Order dismissing the appeal of Walton in Aylesbury against a warrant removing John Walker and his wife from Bledlow.

 

p. 249.  Order referring the appeal of Mr. William Sparkes against his assessment to rates at Little Marlow to the justices for the hundreds of Desburrow and Burnham.

 

p. 250.  Order dismissing the appeal of Great Missenden 

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against a warrant removing Thomas Mott and his wife from the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Tottrenhoe, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing William Webb and Frances, his wife, from Edlesborough.

 

p. 251.  Further adjournment of the appeal of Thomas Machell against his assessment to rates at Wendover.

 

The consideration of the rates to be settled by the Court in accordance with the act of 6 and 7 William III, c. 16, for establishing the rates of Water Carriage on the River Thames, is adjourned until the next session.

 

p. 252.  Order staying further process against the inhabitants of Ellesborough.

 

p. 253.  Order that the treasurers produce their accounts to be audited by two justices in the manner laid down at the Easter Session, 1692, namely, in a “Book consisting of two Quire of good Dutch Paper, handsomely bound, and ruled . . . after the method of debtor and creditor.”  [And see Bucks Sessions Records, Volume I, pages 426-427.]

 

p. 254.  Order that Charles Noy of Aylesbury shall be bound over to appear at the next session to answer an indictment on the following evidence.  At a Petty Session he declared “that there was an Information of Treason against the king given to some Justices of the Peace of this County and little or no notice taken of it.  And Mr. Sergt. Thurbarne replying he thought there were no Gentlemen here but would take notice of such an Information, Charles Noy answered ‘I’le meddle no more here but will go upp and declare it to the King and Councill.’”  At a later session, held at the King’s Head in Aylesbury, he again declared “that there was Treason against King William sworne before two Justices of the Peace and there was no notice taken of it.  Mr. Mayne demanded of him to name those two Justices of the Peace, and he replyed ‘I will not do it, for King William can have 

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no Justice here and I will go upp and acquaint the King and Councill with it.’”

 

Order made, with the consent of Mr. Mayo and others of the parties present, that in future “Cripples, vagrants and other persons” to be passed between “the Burrough of Chepping Wycombe and the Forrens of the same” shall be conveyed “at the equall and joynt charge of the said Burrough and Forrens.”  [And see Vol. 5, p. 31.]

 

p. 255.  Order discharging the indictment against Edward Edwards “for want of certainty in setting out his said offence.”  [See p. 182.]

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury the complaint of John Aldridge of Wendover that Edward Thompson, one of the overseers, has wrongfully collected, and is detaining, certain money.

 

p. 256.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Penn against a warrant settling John Moody there.

 

Andrew Miller of Chepping Wycomb, apothecary, admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate to the effect that he had “served his late Majesty King Charles the second as a souldier in the Regiment of Horse commanded by the right Honourable Thomas, late Earle of Cleavland, deceased, in the Troop of Captain Richard Brugis,” and that he had “demeaned himself orderly and faythfully until such time as the said Regiment was dis- banded” in 1666.

 

p. 257.  Certain prisoners in the gaol petitioned for an allowance of 3d. a day for bread, “setting out that their whole subsistence depended intirely upon the said allowance of bread and that the prices of wheat still continued very high.”  The names of the prisoners were: Thomas Winslow, George Clark, John Matthews, Henry Travell, Richard Saunders, John Savill, Robert Wych, George Lay, William Timbs, William Caves, and Thomas Wilkinson.

 

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Alexander Olliff to be paid £2 for maintaining Alice Maxfield for fifteen weeks.

 

p. 258.  Alice, widow of Nathaniel Patee of Farnham Royal, to be allowed £1. 10s. out of the County stock.  [And see pp. 129 and 195.]

 

Mary, wife of John Suddle, to be paid £2. 10s. for maintaining Damaris Bright, “a County Child,” for a year.

 

p. 259.  “Forasmuch as in the present Juncture of Affaires, to obviate the malevolent Influence of wicked and Trayterous Conspirators upon the good Subjects of his most sacred Majesty, it was thought fitt to tender an Association to the Gentlemen and Inhabitants of this County,” the following bailiffs of hundreds are to be paid £2 each as a reward for their trouble in the matter: Thomas Hurles of Ashenden, William Newland of Cottesloe, William Parker of Bucking- ham, Thomas Read of Aylesbury, John Johnson of Newport, and James Hazell of the Chiltern hundreds.

Thomas Read is also to be paid £1 “for his good service to the Countrey in searching for Armes suspected to have bene Lodged or gotten into the Custody of disaffected persons for the disturbance of the Government.”  [And see p. 275.]

 

p. 260.  Mr. Arthur Crabb of Aylesbury to be paid £1 “for his care and paines in writeing severall Warrants relating to the public,” the clerk of the peace £5 for sending out copies of the “Association” to the bailiffs and chief con- stables, and Mr. Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, £10 for  “public service.”

 

pp. 261-262.  Usual table of Servants’ wages.  [See pp. 125-126.]

 

p. 263.  Usual order as to the rates for carriage of goods by land. [See p. 127.]

 

p. 264.  Order passing the accounts of John Maccascree, 

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gentleman, “Treasurer for the Weeks Tax of the Militia,” which had been audited by Sir Thomas Lee, Bt., and Richard Beke and Francis Duncombe, esquires, deputy lieutenants.

 

pp. 265-266. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Edward Lovejoy, Simon Harris, Richard and Godsgift Davis, Thomas Neal, John Tomlins, John Turner, Roger Cutler and Richard Butterfield, and the acquittals of Ralph Pangburne, and John and Elizabeth Preston [see pp. 181-184]; the convictions of Robert Beckford and Jeremiah Harman [see p. 209] and James Gaylor [see p. 234], and the acquittal of William Gibbs [see p. 210].

 

p. 267. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Adams (p. 104), Richard Baldwin and Christopher Faber (p. 172), Silvester Lane and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), Edward Tudor (p. 133), Thomas Underwood, Thomas True, and Matthew Stephens (p. 200).

 

p. 268. Recognizances entered into.

Peter Horton of Iver, labourer, and Richard Webb of Brill, baker, in £40 each to appear and answer.

Charles Noy of Aylesbury, bodice-maker, in £40, and Edward Edwards of Aylesbury, husbandman, and George Grove of Chepping Wycomb, yeoman, as sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer.

 

p. 269.  Fines and issues.

Thomas Godfrey of Stoney Stratford and Robert Honnor of Fenny Stratford fined £1. 10s. each for non- attendance on juries.

The fines of those convicted on pp. 265-266.

 

p. 270.  Recognizances discharged.

Henry Lloyd and Richard Sudden, both of Dorney, William Fellow of Boveney, Richard Walker of Taplow, 

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bargeman, Christopher Williamson of Hitcham, yeoman, Christopher Andrewes of Taplow, bargeman, William Cox of East Burnham, labourer, John Ives of Brightwell, John Harbor of Lent in Burnham, yeoman, Samuel Vass of Crundle, co. Southampton, upholsterer, Colborne Hodgkins of Beconsfield, innholder, William Venables of Wooborne, wheeler, Henry Goldwyn of Burnham, sawyer, John Ive of Brightwell, James Styles of Burnham, yeoman, John Havergill of Fawley, husbandman, Jonathan Sawyer of Henley-on-Thames, co. Oxford, gentleman, John Ludgrave of Fawley, husbandman, Thomas Goodchild, farmer, John Appleby, blacksmith, and John Harding, farmer, all of Dorney, William Franklyn, William Symons, and Thomas Butcher, all of Shipton Lee in Quainton, labourers, Robert Phipps and James Style, churchwardens, and Henry Messenger, overseer, of Burnham, William Martin junior, gardener, and Robert Moone, farrier, both of Great Marlow, Rebecca Martin and Thomas Sharpe, blacksmith, both of Braddenham, and Thomas Sharpe of Windsor, co. Berks., blacksmith.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 271-272.  [Blank].

 

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION AT AMERSHAM, AYLESBURY, AND CHEPPING WYCOMBE 16th, 23rd, and 29th July, 1696 [5 William III]

 

p. 273  Jurors for the body of the county.

John Aldridge and John Allen, gentlemen, William Carter, William Lea, Richard Greenwood, John Redding, Thomas Goodson, John Symonds, Thomas Winter, John Woodbridge, William Tipping, Aaron Gibbs, Thomas Snowe, William Snowe, John Sawell, William Addams, William Edmonds, James Norwood, and Henry White.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

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Jurors for the case against Richard Webb and Jane Inwood.

John Chase, gentleman, Adiel Hawes, John Young, Walter Bovingdon, William Child, Thomas Chersley, John Parratt, Jonas Harding, Richard Grimsdale, Robert Fellow, Henry Moreton, and Nathaniel Moreton.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 274.  The following officials took the statutory oaths: Hugh Horton of Apsley in Ellesborough, esquire, John Maccascree of Ashridge, gentleman, and Henry Munday and William Best, both of Aylesbury, gentlemen.

 

p. 275.  The names of those persons who took the oaths contained in I William and Mary, c. 8, were entered on the Sessions Rolls.

 

p. 276.  The names of those persons who signed the following Association, drawn up in accordance with the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 27, were entered on the Sessions Rolls.  The terms of the Association were as follows:

“Whereas there has bene a horrid and detestable Conspiracy formed and carried on by Papists and other wicked and traiterous persons for Assassinating his Majestyes Royall Person in order to incourage an Invasion from France to subvert our Religion, Lawes, and Liberty, Wee whose names are hereunto subscribed do heartily, sincerely, and solemnly profess, testify, and declare that his present Majestie King William is rightfull and Lawfull King of these Realms. And Wee do mutually promise and engage to stand by and Assist each other to the utmost of our power in the support and defence of his Majestyes most sacred Person and Govern- ment against the late King James and all his Adherents. And in case his Majesty come to any violent or untimely death which (God forbid) Wee do hereby further freely and unanimously oblige ourselves to unite, Associate, and stand by each other in revenging the same upon his Enemies and their Adherents and in supporting and defending the Succession of the Crown according to” the act of I William and Mary, sess. 2, c. 2. [And see p. 259.]

 

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Memorandum that the house of George Wilson at Walton Street in Aylesbury was registered as a meeting house. 

pp. 277-278. Indictments.

Charles Noy of Aylesbury, bodice-maker, for libelling William Busby and Francis Ligo, esquires, justices of the peace, on two separate occasions.  [And see p. 254; removed by certiorari.]

William Wallis of Brill, yeoman.  for breaking into the house of Thomas Parker and assaulting Mary, his wife. [Not guilty.]

Thomas Woodward, petty constable of Aylesbury, for irregularly billeting soldiers, in that he quartered 14 foot- soldiers at the King's and Queen’s Head and I officer and 8 foot-soldiers at the Saracen's Head, but none at his own inn or at that of Thomas Hill.  [Removed by certiorari; and see p. 288.]

Jane, wife of John Inwood of Stewkley, wheelwright, for stealing 1¾ yards of serge and two pairs of stockings from William Giles junior.  [To “be whipped by the Exe- cutioner till her body is bloody.”]

Peter Horton of Iver, labourer, and Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victualler, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.  [The latter fined £1.]

Thomas Alexander, John Temple and [Ann], his wife, John Howes, [Ann], his wife, and Finch, his son, William and Peter Collingridge, and Sir Edward Longvile, Bt., for absence from church.  [See note on page 71.]

George Pease of Stoney Stratford, Amos Higgombottom of Great Linford, and Stafford Stevens of Iver, all labourers, Edward Tring of Colebrooke in Horton, Richard Wilbee of Chalfont St. Giles, Richard Whitmill of Ham in Waddesden, Francis Randall of Long Crendon, John Billingdon of Whit- church, and William Harris of Shenley Church End, for trading as badgers without being licensed.

 

p. 279. Presentment of the grand jury.

Robert Bate of Weston Turvile, husbandman, for obstructing a watercourse at South Mead.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

 

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Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Bourne of Bledlow and Peter Horton of Iver for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

The persons indicted above for absence from church, and John Tipper, John Moby and Ann, his wife, Mary Goodman, Alice Joanes, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, and [blank] Mosedell, and [blank] Longvile of Fulmer, Elnathan Payne, John Oakeley, and Michael Anthony, all of Eton, Elizabeth Barnes, widow, and Richard, her son, Thomas Crumpton, esquire, Mary Bringhurst, widow, and John Bringhurst, gentleman, all of the Forrens of Great Marlow, for recusancy.

William Ilesly of Borstall for a pound breach.

Philip Drewe of Fawley, husbandman, for refusing to assist John Lugrove, the constable.

 

Orders.

p. 280.  Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Burnham the dispute between Lambert Edmunds of Stoke Poges, wheelwright, and Richard Stevens, his apprentice. [See p. 313.]

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Newport the complaint of Bradwell that “Cripples . . . are irregularly conveyed to the unjust oppression” of the parish on the London Road from Loughton and from Woolverton.  [See p. 314.]

 

Order postponing further process against the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Gyles and Ellesborough.

 

p. 281.  John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his quarter's salary of £7. 10s.

 

Further adjournment of the appeal of Mentmore against a settlement order [see p. 318], and of the consideration of the rates of Water Carriage to be settled by the Court in accordance with the act of 6 and 7 William III, c. 16.

 

p. 282.  Daniel Holderness, a “Mariner belonging to his 

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MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1696

 

Majestyes Ship the Sandwich,” is ordered to be sent from Great Marlow to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb, and to be detained there until removed by the sheriff, “as by his Majestyes Orders in Councill he is or shalbe required.”

 

Order for the whipping of Jane Inwood.  [See p. 277.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Pightlestone against a warrant settling Elizabeth Carter in the parish.

 

p. 283.  Order referring to certain justices the complaint of the constables of the Parsons Fee in Aylesbury that the constables of the Lords Fee are in the habit of conveying cripples into the Parsons Fee “for their own Ease when their duty was to have conveyed them to some parish . . . more remote”  [See p. 318.]

 

Order that “all persons haveing any Civill Office or any place of Trust from or under the King or by his Authority or by Authority derived from him” shall sign the “Association” if they have not already done so.

 

p. 284.  Order for the return of all jury lists, in accordance with the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 32.

 

p. 285.  In accordance with the act [7 and 8 William III, c. 31] “for continuing to his Majestie certain dutyes upon Salt, Glass Wares, Stone and Earthen Wares, and for grant- ing severall dutyes upon Tobacco Pipes and other Earthen Wares for carrying on the Warr against France,” etc., the Court settled “the rates and prices of all Salt to be sold or exposed to sale,” as follows:

“For Newcastle Salt, Wayne Salt, and other Salt unrefined made within this Realm not to Exceed 4s. 4d. a Bushell, for Bay Salt and other Foreign Salt not to Exceed 7s. 6d. a Bushell, and so in proportion for a greater or lesser quantity computing fifty-six pounds weight to the Bushell, which rates and prices shall . . . be observed . . . by all persons selling Salt within this County.  And if any Person shall sell any Salt at any Higher price or Rate or refuse to sell 

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any Salt at the respective prices and rates aforesaid, he or she shall . . . for every such offence forfeit . . . £5 to be levyed . . . by Distress.”  Half the above penalty shall be paid to the Crown and the other half to the informer.  The above order to be put up “upon the Markett house or some other of the most publick places of every Markett Towne.”

 

p. 286.  William Timms and Richard Parratt, poor debtors in the gaol, to be granted the same allowance for bread as the prisoners, as they petitioned that they were unable to support themselves or their families.

 

Alexander Olliff to be paid £1 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks, and £2 for clothing her for one year.

 

p. 287.  William Benson, the gaoler, to be allowed £12 on account of money spent by him on strengthening the gaol.

 

“At the instance of Mr. William Vaux it is permitted by this Court that the Clerk of the Peace may Register . . . the Account of Edward Dorill and Isaac Payne, Trustees for the Pasture belonging to the Poor of Oakely.”  The account was dated the 20th July, 1695, and was as follows:

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

 

Paid to 50 Poor persons, 16s. a piece

40

,,

00

,,

00

 

 

 

Paid by Edward Dorill the Quitt Rent

00

,,

15

,,

00

 

 

 

Paid by Isaac Payne for worke and other charges

03

 

06

 

02

 

 

 

Paid more to the Poor. .

01

 

00

 

10

,,

 

 

Sum total

45

. .

02

 

00

,,

 

 

 

p. 288.  Thomas Woodward, constable of the Lords Fee at Aylesbury, dismissed from his office on account of “severall notorious Complaints” of his misbehaviour, and Elisha Peryn sworn in his place.

 

p. 289.  Order that Catherine Maxfield, “a child borne in 

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the Goal,” shall be put under the care of Alexander Olliff, as Elizabeth Whitchurch, in whose care she has previously been, has died.

 

pp. 290-299.  The following insolvent debtors in the gaol are ordered to be released in accordance with the provisions of 22 and 23 Charles II, c. 20, 30 Charles II, stat. 1, c. 7, and 7 and 8 William III, c. 12.  They were all committed to prison on the 25th December, 1695.

Henry Travell of [Blank], committed at the suit of William Gilpin.  Other creditors were Edward Cooper, Mary Potter, widow, Elizabeth Smith, widow, William Buck senior, John Matthew, John Barnes, John Chune, Matthew Gurney, Thomas Pomford, Thomas Kent, John Batterson, Samuel Hartley, and Zachary Thorneton, all of Newport Pagnell; Leonard Thompson, Alice Luck, Richard Cadwell, Samuel Evins, Henry Potter junior, William Hartly, William Watts, and William Godfrey, all of Stoney Stratford. Evidence was given by John Pearce of Aylesbury and Thomas Williamson of Newport Pagnell that notice had been served on all the creditors.

Thomas Winslow of Brill, husbandman, committed at the suits of Ann Gregory, widow, and Philip Neve, esquire. Other creditors were Richard Wilson of Brill, Thomas Alley, Austin West, Thomas Hunt, Sir John Awbrey, William Shurley, Mary Guntrey, Richard Wilson, George Hunt, William Hebborne, William Green, George Harris, Frances Brangwell, Philip Scoley, William Pilkington, Edward Hart, esquire, Thomas Townesend, Richard Baker, John Green, Robert Goldar, Robert Carver, John Gillchrist, Thomas Halsdon, and John Applebe.  Evidence was given by Edward Winslow of Brill that notice had been served on all the creditors.

Joan Matthews of [Blank], committed at the suit of Nathaniel Makepiece.  Other creditors were Edward Redding and William Nottingham, both of London, victuallers. Evidence was given by Thomas Franklyn of Aylesbury, labourer, that notice had been served on all the creditors.

John Savidge, alias Savill of [Blank], committed at the suit of Thomas North.  Other creditors were Christopher 

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Farmer of Chalfont St. Giles, John Macer, John Fly, Frances Snow, and John Owen, all of Woxbridge, [co. Middlesex], Elizabeth Parsons, John Hobson, Joan Mills, spinster, Jonathan Wilson, George Tranter, William Founes, John Rogers, and Henry Cooperis, all of London, Simon Archer of Mondrey, co. Suffolk, James Bennett, John Cro, executor of Henry Cro, Sir John Barker, John Grimwood, James Hutson, Edward Milsop, Isaac Cooke, Richard Puplett, Abraham Rise, Elizabeth Rivers, widow, and Sarah Hugell, widow, all of Ipswich, [co. Suffolk], John Kemster of Har- wich, [co. Essex], Richard Nuton, James House, and Samuel Robinson, all of White Elm, co. Suffolk, John Burrowes of White Linn, co. Suffolk, John Potter of Riddingall, co. Suffolk, Samuel Robinson of Earl Stower, co. Suffolk, George Baker of Rattilston, co. Suffolk, George Blackbrown of Thurston, co. Suffolk, John Warren, John Crask, John Halls, Thomas Prince, and Nicholas Digon, all of Bury St. Edmunds, co. Suffolk, Thomas Bright of Neither Hall, co. Suffolk, William Morris and John Clarke, both of St. Albans, [co. Hertford], Joseph Jackwas and Thomas Olliff, executor of Thomas Harding, both of Redborne, co. Hertford, Mary Harding of Haster in Tring, [co. Hertford], widow, Robert Holland, Matthew Parish, William Talboys, William Wyatt, John Welch, Benjamin Monck, Thomas Sheene, Francis Whitchets, Mary Saxton, widow, and John White, all of Aylesbury.  Evidence was given by John Tatham of Bierton, Edward Winslow of Brill, and Thomas Franklyn of Aylesbury, all labourers, that notice had been served on all the creditors.

 

p. 300.  William Newland, bailiff of the hundred of Cotteslo, took the oaths contained in the act of 27 Elizabeth, c. 12.

 

Henry Munday, bridewell-keeper at Aylesbury, to be paid his quarter's salary of £7. 10s.

 

Susan, widow of Michael Read, the late bridewell- keeper at Aylesbury, to be paid £2. 10s. for acting in the place of her husband until a successor was appointed and for allowing "her house in Aylesbury and her goods to be made 

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use of for the confinement and Chastisement of Prisoners” for a month.

 

p. 301.  Indictments confessed and traversed.

The acquittal of Richard Webb [see p. 208], and the conviction of Jane Inwood [see p. 277].

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: Richard Baldwin and Christopher Faber (p. 172), Silvester Lane and Thomas Bigg (p. 77), Edward Tudor (p. 133), Thomas Underwood and Matthew Stevens (p. 200), and Peter Horton of Iver (p. 268).

 

p. 302.  Recognizances entered into.

William Pix of Newport Pagnell, wheelwright, in £40 as surety for his son, Edward, in respect of the bastard child of Catherine Allen.

William Wallis of Brill, yeoman, Charles Noy of Aylesbury, bodice-maker, Edward Fastnidge junior of Princes Risborough, yeoman, and Thomas Woodward of Aylesbury, victualler, in £40 each, to appear and answer; and James Bates of Aylesbury, linen-draper, as surety in £20 for Wood- ward’s appearance on another charge.

 

p. 303.  Fines and issues.

Thomas Aldridge of Beconsfield, William Foskett of North Crawley, gentleman, and John Wright of Great Brickhill fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

 

p. 304.  Recognizances discharged.

William Addams of Quarrendon, labourer, Richard Bryars of Waddesden, yeoman, Henry Warner of Quarrendon, yeoman, Charles Noy, bodice-maker, and Edward Edwards, husbandman, both of Aylesbury, George Grace of Chepping Wycomb, yeoman, Richard Webb of Brill, baker, John Grove, constable, Robert Jones, innholder, and William Smith, wheelwright, all of Beconsfield, William Clarke 

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labourer, John Lovejoy, bargeman, and George Phelps, miller, all of Great Marlow, William Pix of Newport Pagnell, wheelwright, Thomas Bull, blacksmith, and William Burrowes, baker, both of Stewkley, William Sheene, labourer, John Stratfold, labourer, and John White, butcher, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Bromley, carrier, John Beddall, labourer, and Jonathan Gurney, carpenter, all of Monks Risborough, Thomas Woodward, victualler, and James Bates, draper, both of Aylesbury, William Wallis, potash-maker, and John Hebborne, labourer, both of Brill, Richard Wilson of [Blank], John Berry, farmer, William Hale, victualler, and Richard Webb, innholder, all of Agmundisham, Lambert Edmunds, wheeler, and William Green, cooper, both of Stoke, Richard Good, Robert Canby, William Tylliard, Robert Gilbert, and Jonathan Lauder, all innholders, and Susan Canby, spinster, all of Slow.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 305-306.  [Blank.]

 

 

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT WENDOVER

8th October, 1696 [5 William III]

 

p. 307.  Jurors for the body of the county.

John Neale, gentleman, Michael Welles, Thomas Welles, Ephraim Holt, John Wade, John Baker, John Jackson, Thomas Coles, John Whitchurch, William Corby, Thomas Bunce, Henry Markham, Robert Carter, John Garrett, John Howes, William Grace, Joshua Geary, Zebulun Hawkins, and David Saxby.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Edward Fastnidge and William Wallis.

Robert Moreton, gentleman, Thomas Bampton, John Barrowby, Thomas Edwards, Henry Hunt, Thomas 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1696

 

Garroway, Henry Putnam, John Tokefield senior, James Herne, Jonas Harding, Richard Blackwell, and Daniel Littlepage.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 308.  The following officials took the statutory oaths: George Grove and Edward Marshall, gentleman, justices for the borough of Chepping Wycombe, and Anthony Bourchier of Newport Pagnell, gentleman.

 

The houses of Thomas Bell of Bow Brickhill and Geoffrey Willeson of Newton Longuevile were registered as meeting houses.

 

p. 309.  Indictments.

Peter Horton of Iver and Thomas Bourne of Bledlow for keeping unlicensed alehouses.  [The latter fined £1 and committed until payment.]

Philip Drewe of Fawley, labourer, for refusing to assist John Lugrove, the constable.

William Ilesly of Borstall for a pound breach.

William Church of Little Marlow, labourer, for keeping a disorderly alehouse to which persons resorted, even upon fast days, to drink and play ninepins.  [Not guilty.]

Henry Floyd, alias Lloyd, of Dorney, labourer, for a breach of the peace, and for assaulting Susan, wife of Henry Atkinson.  [Removed by certiorari.]

Robert Boddy of Hitcham, labourer, for stealing some chickens from Thomas Boddy.  [Not guilty.]

The inhabitants of Chalfont St. Peters for not repairing part of the road from Chalfont St. Giles to Agmundisham. [Discharged on certificate.]

 

p. 310.  Informations.

John Owen, Richard Madkins, Robert North, Edward North, John Mitchell, William Steele, Edward Steele, John Webster, John Steward, senior and junior, and Robert Stutsbury, all of Buckingham, Jeremiah Cavery of Loughton, Christopher Warren of Padbury, Stephen Gurden and John 

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Gurden, both of Leckhamsted, John Coare junior and Thomas George, both of Gawcott, Charles Inwood of Little Horwood, William Clarke of Tingewicke, Humphrey Smith of Marsh Gibbon, Robert Markham and Henry Scott, senior and junior, all of Middle Cleydon, John Rowell of Bottle Cleydon, Thomas Upstone and Thomas Linney, both of North Marston, and John Botley of Grendon Underwood, all labourers, for trading as badgers and kidders without being licensed.

 

p. 311.  Presentments of the grand jury.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes and his family, [Ann] Temple, widow, Sir Edward Longvile, John Tipper, John and Ann Maby, Mary Goodman, Alice Jones, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, [blank] Mosedale, [blank] Longvile of Fulmer, gentleman, Elnathan Payne, John Oakley, and Michael Anthony, all of Eaton, Elizabeth Barnes, widow, and Richard, her son, Thomas Crumpton, esquire, Mary Brinkhurst, widow, and John Bringhurst, gentleman, all of Great Marlow, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

 

Presentments of the constables.

The majority of those presented above are again pre- sented by the constables for recusancy.

Susan Barfree of Weston Turvile for bastardy.

Richard Miller of Preston Bissett for a pound breach.

The constables of Edgecott, Water Stratford, Leck- hamsted, and Aston Sandford, and John Fastnidge, gentle- man, constable of Hugenden, for not paying in their quarter- idge money or bringing in their presentments.  [The last named discharged.]

Francis Weedon and Michael Nash, both of Halton, for refusing to watch when ordered by Thomas Turpin, the constable, and allowing a disorderly person to escape from their custody.

Peter Horton of Iver for selling beer without a licence.

 

p. 312.  Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Wycomb Forrens  John Wheeler vice Samuel Gibbs.

 

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Wooburne . . Matthew Crane and William Beck, tailor, vice Richard Spratley and Jasper Heyward, and William Fen- ables and Geoffrey Reynolds as tithingmen vice [James Fretwell and Amos Sparrow].

Penn . . . . Richard Nash vice Thomas Wilkinson, and William Pissey, and Paul King as tithingmen vice William Miles and John Salter.

Weston Turvile . . Richard Bate and Francis Turner vice Thomas Pawley and William Fleet.

Stoke Mandivile . . Thomas Jackson and Richard Pritchett vice Samuel Browne and Henry Harding.

Drayton Beauhampe - Edward Seare vice William Weston.

Stoney Stratford East SideThomas Woolman vice [Anthony Forfitt].

Ludgershall . . Robert Lever vice Francis Sherley.

Bow Brickhill . . William Cooke vice Richard White.

Great Brickhill . . William Woodman and William Rogers senior vice William Shepard and John Meridale.

Great Horwood . . John Barge vice John Bradbury junior.

Brill . . . . Anthony Davis vice William Ladbery.

Chesham Boyes . . Henry Batcheller vice Thomas Larkin.

Chalfont St. Giles . . Richard Wilby and Robert Chearsley vice Charles Piercy and Thomas Hill.

 

Orders.

p. 313.  The cases against Thomas Woodward and Charles Noy are removed to the King’s Bench by writs of certiorari. [See p. 177.]

 

Upon the report of the justices for the hundred of Burnham, Richard Stevens’ indenture of apprenticeship with Lambert Edmunds of Stoke Poges, wheelwright, is now cancelled.  It was reported that Stevens had “without any just provocation run three times away from his Master and 

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had deceived his Master in money intrusted with him and had bene committed to the House of Correction.”

 

p. 314.  John Whitchurch to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Whaddon.

 

Upon the report of the justices for the hundred of New- port it is ordered “that for the future all Cripples that come to Loughton by London road shall from time to time be carryed from thence to Bradwell Abby and forwards to Woolverton, and that. . . all Cripples that come to Woolver- ton by London road shall. . . be carryed from thence to Bradwell Abby forwards to Loughton.”  [And see p. 370 and Vol. 5, p. 68.]

 

p. 315.  Order dismissing the appeal of Newport Pagnell against a warrant removing Margaret Williams from Olney.

 

John Fastnidge discharged from the presentment against him as he has now paid in his quarteridge money and delivered his presentments.  [See p. 311.]

 

Order estreating the recognizance of Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentlemen, on account of his non-appearance to answer the indictments against him.

 

p. 316.  The inhabitants of Chalfont St. Giles discharged from the indictment against them for non-repair of a highway upon producing a certificate that the work has now been done.  [See p. 181.]

 

The overseers of Stoke Mandeville authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways, in accordance with the act of 3 and 4 William and Mary, [c. 12].

 

p. 317.  The bridewell-keepers are ordered to produce at each session “a true Calander in writeing of all such persons as are then actually Prisoners in their respective custodies, with the Causes of the respective Committments of such Prisoners.”

 

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The treasurers are ordered to attend the next session with whatever balances may be remaining in their hands.

 

Order postponing further action against the inhabitants of Ellesborow for non-repair of a highway, on the under- taking of Mr. Young that he will produce a justices' certificate before the next Midsummer session.

 

p. 318.  Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Cotteslowe and Aylesbury the decision as to what relief the overseers of Ivinghoe should allow Alice Parish, widow, and Richard Fowler and his wife.

 

Upon the report of the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury, it is ordered, in regard to the dispute between the petty constables of the Parsons Fee and of the Lords Fee at Aylesbury, that all “Cripples” should be passed direct to the “parish next in the road” and should not be sent on from one “Fee or Mannor” to another, and that the cost of passing should be “at the charge of the Parish of Aylesbury without any Distinction according to the Fees or Mannors in which the said Constables are elected.”

 

p. 319.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Mentmore against a warrant removing Elizabeth Anderson from Soulbury.  The justices to whom the appeal was referred, decided that the house of Richard Shockley lay in the parish of Mentmore.  [See p. 221].

 

Complaints were made to the Court that several of the chief constables had “executed their said Offices by Deputies, who for their own unjust lucre have imposed on the petty Constables, . . . have presumed to represent their respective principles when called to their presentments and . . . have also presumed to deliver in such presentments upon their own Oaths.”  The petty constables also complained that the chief constables have been in the habit of refusing “to receive the presentments and Quarteridge money from their hands when tendered unless they were attended by them in some public place, which required an unnecessary Expence 

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of their money.”  The Court ordered that in future no chief constable should be allowed to be absent from the sessions without leave, and that the petty constables should be allowed to bring their presentments and quarteridge money to the private houses of the chief constables.

 

p. 320.  Orders extending the recognizances of Edward Porter of Hitcham and Thomas Winslow of Brill for the appearance of Ann, wife of Allen Wansell, and the recog- nizance of Peter Horton.

 

Order that the recognizance of Thomas Bigg of Fulmer shall not be estreated on account of his non-appearance, as it appears “that this Estreating . . . will be the utter ruin of him and his family.”

 

Order postponing further process against the inhabitants of Woolverton for non-repair of a highway.

 

p. 321.  Mr. Thomas Coles of Ickford produced an account for 17s. 10d. for repairs to Ickford Bridge, which he had performed on the order of one of the justices.  But, as the Court “could not be fully satisfied that the said Ickford Bridge was at any time repaired at the County Charge,” the clerk of the peace was ordered to “search the Books of Orders about the year 1685 or further” too see if there was any precedent to warrant the payment of this allowance for repairs.  [See p. 339.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Whitchurch against a warrant removing Judith, widow of John Bly, and her children, Thomas, John, Judith, Michael, and Joseph, from Little Horwood, except in respect of the last two children, who, having been born at Little Horwood, are to “continue with their said mother as nourse children” at the expense of the latter parish until they reach the age of seven.

 

p. 322.  Order allowing the appeal of Pightleston against a warrant removing Elizabeth Carter and her son from Edlesborough.

 

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John Rose, Matthew Annesley, and Henry Munday, bridewell-keepers at Chipping Wycomb, Newport Pagnell, and Aylesbury respectively, to be paid their quarter's salaries of £7. 10s. each.

 

John Rowell of Chepping Wycomb, joiner, to be admitted to a County pension of £4 a year.  He produced a certificate that he had “served his late Majesty King Charles the second as a souldier in the Regiment of Horse commanded by the right honorable Thomas, late Earl of Cleveland, as a Trooper in a Troop of Horse . . . commanded by Captain Richard Brugis.”

 

p. 323.  John Watts, constable of Water Stratford, to be discharged as he has now produced his presentments and paid in his quarteridge money.

 

Elizabeth, widow of Richard Bruges, gentleman, to be paid £2. 10s. out of the County stock, the Court being satisfied that her late husband “had greatly impaired his Estate in the service of the late King Charles the first.”

 

Jane Parmer to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Wendover.

 

p. 324.  Order that an allowance of 3d. a day for bread shall be paid to the following prisoners in the gaol: George Lye, Edward Thompson, Thomas Burgis, John Foskene, John Richardson, Richard Rogers, Richard Parr, William Timms, William Caves, and Thomas Perkins.

 

A similar allowance is to be paid to Thomas Jenkins and Thomas Hebburne, who stated “that they were both souldiers in his Majesties service for six years and disabled in the said service and upon their Return home have bene arrested for their Debts and thrown into Goal.”

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury the dispute between the borough and the Forrens of Wendover as to the payment of the petty constables’ rate. 

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p. 325.  William Benson, the gaoler, to be allowed £3. 7s. for a wagon and an escort for conveying fifteen prisoners to the Assizes at Chepping Wiccombe.

 

Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks.

 

Order of Court altering the price of salt as fixed at the last session.  The price for “Newcastle salt, Wayne salt, and other salt unrefined made within this Realme” is not to exceed 6s. a bushel, and that for “Bay salt and other forreign salt” is not to exceed 8s.  [See p. 285.]

 

p. 326.  Mr. Thomas Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £13. 6s. 8d. for work done for the County.

 

Although the petty constables were at the last session ordered to bring in their jury lists, in accordance with the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 32 [see p. 284], certain of them have failed to do so, “which this Court resents as a wilfull Obstinacy.”  The defaulters are ordered to appear at the next sessions with their lists, or be presented for contempt of court.  This order refers to the constables of the following parishes—Aylesbury hundred: Horsindon, and Little Hampden; Ashenden hundred: Brill and Kingsey; Cottes- lowe hundred: Weedon in Hardwick and Horton; Bucking- ham hundred: Caversfield, Foskett, Lamport, Leckhamsted, Lethenburrowe, Tingewick, and Westbury; Newport hundred: Caldecott, Fenny Stratford, Gore Chappell. Staunton Bury, Woolverton, Stoney Stratford East Side, and Bradwell Abby.  [See p. 336.]

 

p. 327.  The clerk of the peace to be paid £5. 10s. for making twenty-eight copies of a “Letter from the Lords of his Majestyes privy Councill to the Right Honourable the Custos Rotulorum of this County” and distributing them to the justices, for making and distributing sixteen copies of the order concerning the price of salt, and for purchasing and binding the statutes of the last session of Parliament.

 

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p. 328. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The acquittals of Edward Fastnidge [see p. 210], Robert Boddy [see p. 309] and William Wallis [see p. 277].

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: Richard Baldwin and Christopher Faber (p. 172), Thomas Bigg (p. 77), Peter Horton (p. 268), and Ann Wansall (p. 320).

 

pp. 329-330. Recognizances entered into.

William Pix for his son, Edward. [See p. 302.]

John Godfrey of Stoke Poges, farmer, in £40, with Thomas Godfrey of the same, yeoman, as surety in £20, for the former’s appearance at assizes, and Henry Lea of Iver, yeoman, in £10 to appear and prosecute him.  The following are bound over in £10 to appear and give evidence: Francis Hartwell, yeoman, and Joseph Porter, butcher, both of Langley Marish, John Battin and Richard Ellard, both of East Burnham, farmers, and Henry Sprigg of Farnham Royal, butcher.

Thomas Woodward of Aylesbury, victualler, in £40, with Charles Noy, bodice-maker, and James Bate, draper, both of the same, as sureties in £20 each for Woodward's appearance at assizes.

William Church of Little Marlow and Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victuallers, in £40 each to appear at the next session.

 

p. 331.  Fines and issues.

Robert Streame of Ovinghe, Richard Cox of Steeple Cleydon, William Perkins of Tingewick, Robert Grange of Little Horwood, gentleman, John West of Horton, and Henry Ryman of Iver, fined £1. 10s. for non-attendance on juries.

Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, forfeits his recog- nizance of £20 for non-appearance, and his sureties William Fellow of Boveney and Richard Sedding of Dorney, yeoman, forfeit £10 each.

Edward Tudor of London, tobacco-pipe maker, similarly 

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forfeits £20, and his surety, William Hartshorn of New Windsor, co. Berks, forfeits £20.

 

p. 332.  Recognizances discharged.

Thomas Underwood, labourer, and Henry Edlin, gentle- man, both of Little Horwood, William Wallis of Brill, yeoman, Edward Fastnidge junior of Princes Risborough, yeoman, Thomas Woodward of Aylesbury, victualler, Robert Waldocke, tailor, John Waldocke, labourer, and Robert Willison, yeoman, all of Drayton Parslow, John Bowden and William Bowden, both of Solbury, labourers, William Burrowes of Stewkley, baker, John Godfrey, farmer, Thomas Godfrey, yeoman, and William Green, victualler, all of Stoke Poges, Robert Boddy of Hitcham, farmer, Christopher Stockdale of Wooborn, farmer, Richard Body of Chepping Wycomb, farmer, Duncombe Campbell, alias Doctor Camp- bell, of Oakley, Thomas Thornton of Borestall, farmer, Joseph Frazier of Brill, victualler, John Style, warrener, Richard Pond, yeoman, and Robert Webb, cordwainer, all of Burnham, Joseph Dorrell and William Turner, both of Hedgerley, farmers, Stephen Dorrell of Burnham, farmer, John Harding of Dorney, farmer, Stephen Woodbridge of Beconsfield, farmer, John Heycock of Clifton Reynes, miller, Abraham Glover of East Burnham, tailor, James Hassell of Beconsfield, tailor, William Church of Little Marlow, victualler, Thomas Ritchmond, labourer, Thomas Bray, bargeman, and William Platts, bargeman, all of Great Marlow, Francis Weedon, carpenter, Michael Nash, yeoman, and Thomas Brandon, yeoman, all of Halton, Henry Scott of Olney, labourer, Henry Lea of Iver, yeoman, Francis Hartwell, yeoman, and Joseph Porter, butcher, both of Langley Marish, John Battin and Richard Ellard, both of East Burnham, farmers, Henry Sprigg of Farnham Royal, butcher, Henry Atkinson of Dorney, clerk, Thomas Boddy, farmer, and Ruth Evered, spinster, both of Chalfont St. Giles, and Thomas Turpin and Thomas Brandon, both of Halton, yeomen.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

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EPIPHANY SESSION

AT AYLESBURY

15th January, 1696-97 [5 William III]

 

p. 333.  Jurors for the body of the county.

Nathaniel Birch, gentleman, Thomas Dover, John Benning, Henry Whitchurch, William Oliver, William Richardson, Richard Shrimpton, Thomas Cox, Thomas Twynam, William Edgerton, and William Rawlins, gentle- men, Henry Ward, Thomas Worster, Geoffrey Bampton, William Hobbs, Robert Jane, John Herbert, Thomas Worrall, William Goldwin, Christopher Ellis, and Robert Cowley.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Thomas Bourne, John Harris, Richard Cluff, and William Church.

Joseph Bampton, John Jordan, gentleman, Thomas Brookes, Peter Goldsworth, John Goldsworth, Thomas Barnaby, Robert Barnaby, Joseph Smith, Edward Monday, William Edmunds, Thomas Edmunds, and John North.

(signed) John Lee, esquire, sheriff.

 

The house of Thomas Graveney at Buckland Wood in Buckland, and Well Close, belonging to Thomas Briden of Edlesborowe, were registered as meeting houses.

 

p. 334.  Thomas Bromley of Monks Risborow, carrier, con- victed of swearing “20 severall Oaths,” on the evidence of Daniel Roos, James Cambell, and John Fowles, soldiers “in the Company of Collonel John Stuart in the Regiment of Scoch guards.”

 

Indictments.

Ann Smith of Becconsfield, widow, for keeping a disorderly house and for harbouring harlots.  James Hazzell prosecuted.

Thomas Bromley of Monks Risborough, carrier, for assaulting Daniel Roose.  [Not guilty.]

John Harris of Iver, labourer, for stealing a beehive 

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from Arthur More, esquire.  John Parker and others prosecuted.  [Not guilty.]

Thomas Goodchild, Bartholomew Langley, and Richard Langley, all of Dorney, labourers, for rioting and for assault- ing the Rev. Henry Atkinson.  [Fined £5 each and com- mitted until payment.]

Thomas Kempe, surveyor of the highways at Akely, for not summoning a meeting of the constables and other officers to nominate his successor.  [Fined £1.]

Richard Cluffe of Stewkeley, glover, for stealing a piece of silver from John Bossworth.  [Not guilty.]

Thomas Alexander, John Howes and his family, Sir Edward Longuevile, [blank], Mosedell, and Thomas Cromp- ton, esquire, Mary Brinkhurst, widow, John Brinkhurst, gentleman, Mary Barnes, widow, and Richard Barnes, labourer, all of the Forrens of Great Marlow, and Michael Anthony and John Oakely, both of Eaton, labourers, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

William Martin junior of Great Marlow for obstructing a footpath at Oxford Lane.

John Shelton of Winslowe, Edward Swanhill of Little Horwood, Jeremiah Warner of Whitchurch, William Old of Eakly Lane, Henry Pratt of Grendon Underwood, Peter Neighbor and Edward Burnham, both of Long Crendon, Christopher Hurst of Leckhamsted, [blank] Wall of Wood- rowe, William Hill of Chesham, and Jeremiah Rolfe of Chepping Wycombe, for trading as badgers without being licensed.  The information was given by William Noyes, gentleman.

 

p. 335.  Presentments of the grand jury.

John Howes and his family, Thomas Alexander, Ann Temple, Sir Edward Longvile, and [blank] Webbe and [blank] Dormer, both of Peterley, for recusancy.

 

Presentments of the constables.

The persons indicted above for recusancy, and Elnathan Payne and William Oakley, both of Eaton, are here presented for recusancy.

 

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Ann Smith of Beconsfield, widow, for entertaining inmates.

 

[The names of the petty constables sworn were omitted in error in the original, and were inserted after the Orders, on p. 346]

 

Orders.

p. 336.  The petty constables, who were ordered to come to this session with their jury lists, all duly appeared and were discharged.  [See p. 326.]

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of New- port the appeal of Sir Joseph Alston, Bt., against the order made by the Court at the last session concerning the conveyance of “Cripples” from Woolverton and Loughton to Bradwell.  [See pp. 314 and 380.]

 

Order allowing the appeal of Rickmersworth, co. Hertford, against a warrant removing Ann, wife of John Cary, from Fulmer.

 

p. 337  Order allowing the appeal of Little Woolston against a warrant removing William Jackson, labourer, from Great Woolston.  [And see Vol. 5, p.  92.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Walton-upon-Thames, co. Surrey, against a warrant removing Henry Rogerson from Stoke Poges.  [See p. 372.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Upton against a warrant removing Mary Ladyman from Burnham.  [See p. 371.]

 

p. 338.  Order postponing further process against the in- habitants of Chalfont St. Peters.

 

The treasurers ordered to attend the Court at the next session with the balances remaining in their hands.

 

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The case against Henry Lloyd removed to the King’s Bench by writ of certiorari.  [See p. 309.]

 

Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victualler, committed to prison for refusing to pay his fines of £2 on two indictments for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of the Forrens of Chepping Wycombe against an order of court made at the Easter session.  [See p. 254.]

 

p. 339. Mr. Thomas Coles of Ickford to be paid 17s. 10d. for repairs done by him to Ickford Bridge.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Aylesbury against a warrant  removing Edward Willis, tailor, from Chesham.

 

Thomas Perkins, who was committed to gaol for refusing to find sureties in respect of the bastard child of Sarah Sinfield of Little Brickhill, is ordered to be released as the “Minister, Churchwardens and divers Credible parishioners” of Little Brickhill have certified that “they are desirous the said Perkins should be sett at liberty.”

 

p. 340.  Order dismissing the appeal of Dunton against a warrant removing Thomas Jackson and his wife from Stewkley.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Drayton Parslow against a warrant removing William Chantrell from Stewkley.  [And see Vol. 5, p. 62.]

 

p. 341.  Order dismissing the appeal of Eaton Bray against a warrant removing John Inwood and Ellen, his wife, from Stewkley.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Cublington against a warrant removing John Hinsone and Catherine, his wife, from Stewkley.

 

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Michael Sare, the parish clerk of Hartwell, to be allowed 1s. a week by the overseers.

 

p. 342.  Order that George Loaton, who was committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wicomb as a lunatic on the order of Sir George Treby, Knt., Lord Chief Justice of Common Pleas, at the last Assizes, shall be allowed 2s. a week for his maintenance by the overseers of Little Missenden, who shall also pay John Rose, the bridewell-keeper, £1 for his clothing. [And see p. 345.]

 

William Burrall of Winslowe, butcher, to be admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate that he had served King Charles II “as a souldier commanded by his late Royall Highness Prince Rupert,” the certificate being signed by Bernard Hagedot, “late Cornet of a Troop of Dragoons.”

 

Order increasing the County pension of Arthur Totnall of Chickley from £2 to £4.  Mention was made of his faithful service to King Charles I.

 

p. 343.  John Piddington of Aylesbury, apothecary, to be paid £2. 15s. for medicines provided for four sick prisoners in the gaol.

 

Thomas Reed of Walton in Aylesbury complained that the overseers had reduced his allowance by 6d., under the pretence that they had lost the order of Court made in Epiphany, 1694-95.  They were ordered to pay him his full allowance of 1s. 6d., and all arrears.  [See p. 99.]

 

Rebecca Turner, widow, to be allowed 1s. a week by the overseers of Brill.

 

p. 344.  John Hadland and Francis Rogers, poor debtors in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for their maintenance.

 

The price of English salt fixed at 6s., and of foreign salt at 7s. 6d., a bushel.  [See pp. 285 and 325.]

 

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p. 345.  Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

 

Matthew Annesley, Henry Munday, and John Rose, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their quarter’s salaries. John Rose is also to be allowed £2 for certain necessaries which he had expended on George Loaton, “a lunatic that killed his wife and . . . haveing few lucid Intervalls.”

 

p. 346. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Buckland . . . . Richard Dorrell vice Thomas Wooster.

Newport hundred—

Wavendon . . . . William Wooton vice Thomas Browne.

Broughton . . . . Gilbert Pickring vice Lawrence Smith.

Stoney Stratford East Side   [Blank] Jones, apothecary, vice [Thomas  Woolman].

Cottesloe hundred—

Wing . . . . Christopher Hailey and William Waters vice Richard Perrott and Francis Miller.

Rowsham . . . . John Mortimer of Wingrave vice Thomas Milemore.

Burnham hundred—

East Burnham . . William Goldwin vice Henry Ball.

Boveney . . . . Henry Ball vice Thomas Finch, and John Sanders as tithingman vice Ralph Weston.

 

Indictments confessed and traversed.

Thomas Bourne convicted and fined £1 on each of two indictments.  [See pp. 277 and 309.]

The acquittals of John Harris and Richard Cluffe [see p. 334] and of William Church [see p. 309], and the conviction of Robert Bate [see p. 279].

 

p. 347.   Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: Ann Wansall (p. 320) and William Pix (p. 302).

 

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Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, in £100 to keep the peace towards Henry Atkinson, and in £20 to appear at the Court of Exchequer, and Richard Sudden (Sedwyn) as his surety in the same amounts.

John Harding of Dorney, farmer, in £20, and Robert Boveingdon of Burnham, farmer, as surety in £20, for his good behaviour.

 

Recognizances entered into.

Robert Hitchcock of Aylesbury, gentleman, in £40, and Richard Tombs, victualler, and Edward Parish, labourer, both of the same, as sureties in £10 each, in respect of the bastard child of Ann Thompson, widow.

Ann Johnson of Newport Pagnel, widow, in £40 to appear at Assizes and prosecute William Buncher, Abraham Tims, Benjamin Ping, and Edward Bennet for stealing some money from her house, and John Barnes of the same, bellan, in £20 to appear and give evidence.

Thomas Bromley of Monks Risborough, Thomas Good- childe of Dorney, and Bartholomew Langley of Dorney, all labourers, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p. 348. Fines and issues.

William Kemp of Akely, John Dayton of Edlesborough, George Willett junior of Great Horwood, Thomas Langley of Great Marlow, John Hoare of Bradwell, and Thomas Robinson of Blechley, fined £1. 10s. for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of Thomas Bourne [see pp. 277 and 309], and Robert Bate [see p. 279].

 

p. 349. Recognizances discharged.

William Church of Little Marlow, victualler, Thomas Woodward of Aylesbury, victualler, Thomas Bourne of Bledlow, victualler, Thomas Goodchild, farmer, and John Arden, yeoman, both of Dorney, William Fellow of Burnham, yeoman, Edward Harding, farmer, and Matthew Crane, yeoman, both of Wooborne, John Wilde of Little Marlow, Thomas Blackwell of Wooborne, paper-maker, Bartholomew

 

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Langley and Thomas Goodchild, both of Dorney, yeomen, William Bishop of Hardwick, yeoman, Richard Crosse of Weedon, yeoman, Philip Godman of North Hall, labourer, Richard Cluff, glover, Richard Wigg, yeoman, and Richard Shockley, farmer, all of Stewkley, John Densey, constable, and Joseph Densey, both of Leckhamsted, Robert Oakley, constable of Caversfield, John Mason of Marsh Gibbon, yeoman, Thomas Davis, constable, and William Hazey, both of Foskett, Edward Durant, constable, and James Markham, baker, both of Tingewick, James Bly, constable, and John Shepard, farmer, both of Westbury, Ralph Goodman, constable, and John Townesend, saddler, both of Stow, John Gelly of Buckingham, butcher, Thomas Parratt, blacksmith, John Spratley, dairyman, Robert Friday, dairyman, and William Paxton, all of Hilsden, Robert Hitchcock, gentleman, Richard Tombs, Edward Parish, labourer, William Brandon, brick-maker, James Brandon, pipe-maker, and William Walcop, tile-maker, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Bromley, carrier, and Richard Blackwell, yeoman, both of Monks Risborough, William Carter of Great Kimble, yeoman, John Harris, Isaac Harris, and Philip Butterfield, all of Iver, farmers, Henry Atkinson of Dorney, clerk, Ann Johnson, widow, and John Barnes, bellman, both of Newport Pagnell.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 350.  [Blank.]

 

 

EASTER SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMBE

15th April, 1697 [9 William III]

 

p. 351  Jurors for the body of the county.

Nathaniel Weedon and George Honnor, gentlemen, Thomas Jackson, Thomas Clarke, John Beck, William Bourne, Edward Davison, Richard Titt, Christopher Payne, Thomas Seare, William Baldwin, John Cox senior, Jeremiah

 

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Sexton, George Shrimpton, Thomas Perryman, John Langley, and John Payne.

(signed) Richard Alkyn, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Thomas Bromley and Bartholomew Langley.

[Names not given.]

 

p. 352.  The following officials took the statutory oaths: Richard Alkin of Mill End in Hambledon, esquire, Thomas Barnewell, deputy sheriff, Matthew Pettifer, and Thomas Hunter, victuallers, bailiffs of Chepping Wycomb, Francis Duncombe of Broughton, esquire, Thomas Knight of Shering- ton, gentleman, and Edward Bodington of Cole Brafield, gentleman.

 

The houses of the following were registered as meeting houses: John Hoare of Chepping Wycomb, Ralph Green- wood of North Crawley, John Seers of Wooborne, and Samuel Clarke of Beconsfield, gentleman.

 

The following bailiffs of hundreds took the oaths contained in the act of 27 Elizabeth, c. 12: Thomas Hurles, Thomas Leach, William Tompson senior, William Tompson junior, and James Hazell.  Thomas Barnwell, the deputy sheriff, also took this oath.

 

p. 353. Presentments of the justices.

The inhabitants of Hugenden for not repairing Cryers Lane and Green Lane on the road from Great Hampden to Chepping Wycomb.  [Discharged on certificate.]

William King of Princes Risborough, warrener, for not repairing part of the road from Little Hampden to Wendover, which lies in the parish of Ellesborough.

 

Indictments.

Henry Griffin of Towcister, co. Northampton, labourer, for larceny at Lillingston Dayrell.

John Law of Great Marlow, gentleman, for assaulting William Dandridge.

 

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Thomas Wiggersley and Joseph Mead, both of Great Kimble, labourers, for refusing to do their statutory work on the highways.

Sir Edward Longuevile, Thomas Crompton, Mary Brinkhurst, Mary Barnes, Richard Barnes, Thomas Alexander, John Howes, [Ann] Howes, [Blank] Mosdell, Elnathan Payne, Michael Anthony, John Oakley, and [Ann] Temple, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

 

p. 354. Informations.

John Puttenham of Chesham, John Nash of Chalfont St. Giles, Charles Curle of Stewkley, James Worrall and Nicholas Howe, both of Chepping Wycomb, Thomas Wells of Drayton Parslow, and George Stutsbury of Buckingham, all labourers, for trading as badgers without being licensed.

 

Presentments of the grand jury.

Presentment of the persons indicted above for recusancy, with the addition of John Brinkhurst.

 

Presentments of the constables.

Presentment of the persons indicted above for recusancy, with the addition of John Tipper, [Mary] Tipper, John Maybee, [Ann] Maybee, Frances Carter, and Dorothy Waters.

William King of Ellesborow, yeoman, for digging turf from the Common at Combe Hill.

The constables of Hawridge in Marsworth for not producing their presentments or their quarteridge money.

John Harris of Winslowe “for a dangerous Chimney.”

Peter Ward of Charterhouse Yard, London, gentleman, William Tearle, Richard Prettey, and Edward Garner, all of Aston in Ivingoe, Thomas Costin of North Hall, and Edward Stanbridge of Butlers, for rioting on New Year’s Eve and carrying away a tree from the land of John Edge of Northhall.

Mary Hayes of Iver and Rachel Weaver of Horton for incontinency.

 

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p. 355. Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . . . William Lea of the Lee and Edward Lamborne of Cuddington vice John Strong and James Smith.

Newport . . . . Thomas Withers of Newport Pagnell and John Coote of Water Eaton vice Thomas Rider and Peter Woodward.

Buckingham . . Thomas Grimes of Steeple Claydon and Richard Wise of Foskett vice John Mason and Matthew Adams.

Cottesloe . . . . Edmund Hawkins of Whaddon and William Adams of Burcott in Wing vice George Stone and Henry Adkins.

Ashendon . . John, son of William Randolph of Long Crendon, and Thomas Holt of Gren- don Underwood vice John Bampton and Robert Mayne.

Stoke . . . . Robert Smith of Iver, gentleman, and Richard Ladbrooke of Upton vice George Randall and John Aldridge.

Desborough . . James Harmon senior of Great Marlow and George Shrimpton of Wycomb Forrens vice William Blundell and Thomas Ryman.

Burnham . . . . David Salter of Amersham, tanner, and Matthew Nicholas of Hugely Deane in Farnham Royall vice Timothy Harding and Swithin Butterfield.

 

p. 356. Treasurers sworn.

For the King’s Bench and Mar shalsea- George Grove of the Hill in Penn and Richard Keene of Crofton in Wing, gentlemen, vice William Widmer and Robert Jane, gentlemen.

For the maimed soldiers William Collett of Wendover and John Kidgell of Edlesborough, gentlemen, vice Thomas Gibson and Thomas Ashwell, gentlemen.

 

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pp. 357-358. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury, the Parsons fee John Hawkes and Samuel Stevens vice Robert Todd and Thomas Ball.

Walton . . . . Thomas Dover vice Thomas Stockins.

Bierton . . . . Richard Johnson vice John Hicks.

Bishopstone Stone in Thomas Tomson vice [John Dalafield].

Brandsfee . . . . John Shrimpton vice Moses Putnam, and Daniel Baldwin as tithingman vice Thomas Staple.

Cudington . . William Dixon senior vice Charles Fitch.

Ellesborowe . . William Neighbour of Nash Lee and William Allen of Combe vice Henry Claydon and William Reynolds.

Halton . . . . William Mountague vice Thomas Turpin.

Hulcott . . . . Francis Inkersoul vice John Mustowe.

Great Kimbell . . Edward Smith vice Thomas Humfries.

Great Missenden . . Thomas Eaton and George Hickman vice John Bennett and William Aldridge.

Little Missenden . . John Garratt vice John Cook.

Monks Risborow . . Thomas Syred and Charles Clarke vice John Smith and Samuel Williams.

Princes Risborow . . Thomas Lee vice Henry Mead.

Newport hundred—

Astwood . . . . Richard Kilpin vice Thomas Sheffield.

Bradwell . . . . John Wilmin vice Edward Sewell.

Blechley . . . . Thomas Norris vice William Hames.

Calverton . . Ralph Rutland and William Stirch vice William Booton and Thomas Watkins.

Chichley . . . . William Goodman vice Edward Richardson.

Cole Brayfield . . Richard Spencer vice Henry Stubbs.

Clifton Reynes . . John Sharpe vice Thomas Fesey.

Hanslop . . . . John Fortey and John Crimine vice George Jennings and Richard Hilliar. 

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Lavingdon . . . . Francis Goodwin and John Lamborn vice John Barnes and John Button.

Great Linford . . William Fidggens vice James England.

Middleton Kaines Thomas Kent vice Samuel Porter.

North Crawley . . William Leverett and Robert Nash vice Clement Colcatt and William Day.

Sympson . . Henry Page vice Richard Webb.

Great Woolston . . Richard Dudley vice William Crick.

Little Woolston . . Edward Perry vice Daniel Allison.

Buckingham hundred—

Adstock . . . . Thomas Everett vice Elisha Clarke.

Cottesloe hundred—

Cheddington . . John Jenkins senior vice James Tanner.

Cublington . . George Apsley and Richard Broughton vice James Gardner and James Lucas.

Hollingdon in Soul- Henry Raynor vice John Hall.

bury

Little Horwood . . Richard Barton and William Miller vice John Markham and John Hodgekins.

Circuit in Linslade John Cowley vice John Gurney.

Mentmore . . . . James Collett and William Lathwell vice Thomas Ellott and Isaac Stone.

Muresley . . . . Thomas Ilmore and Richard Pettyson vice William Stevens and Thomas Woodward.

Stewkley . . William Bates vice Thomas Shilborne.

Nettledon in Pight- Thomas Norwood vice John Cricke, who leston  has gone to the county of Hertford.

Swanborne  . . James Franklyn vice Jonas Smith.

Winslowe . . . . Christopher Coates and Daniel Coley vice Joseph Dandridge and Stephen Bigg junior.

Ashenden hundred—

Borstall . . . . Thomas Thorneton vice John Ivates.

Grendon Under- John Fulkes as tithingman vice William wood  Ward.

Lower Winchindon Richard Buckingham vice Francis Dewbery.

Oving . . . . William Scott vice William Foster.

 

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Studley . . . . Henry Saunders vice Robert Saunders.

Wornall . . . . James Roberts vice John Tippinge.

Wootton Under- Thomas Bates vice Edward Pitham.

wood

Wescott . . . . Thomas Reynolds vice Thomas Cripps.

Burnham hundred—

Beconsfield . . John Young and Edward Lack vice William Woodhouse and William Grove, and Edward Peircy, alias Beaumont, and Arthur Tredway as tithingmen vice Edmund Hare and Thomas Hare.

Cheynes . . . . Thomas Port vice Edward Seagrave.

Dorney . . . . Eusebius Windsor vice John Ardin.

Hitcham . . . . John Ball vice Christopher Williamson.

Taplow . . . . Christopher Andrews vice Thomas Allen.

Desborough hundred—

Hambledon . . Peter Rider and Hugh Wiggens vice William House and John Ayer, and William Whiteaves as tithingman vice John Edgerly.

Hedsor in Little Richard Silver vice John Wilde, and Marlow  Andrew Dell as tithingman vice   William Draper.

Radnage . . . . Henry Snowe vice Henry White.

Ipstone in Turfield John Ilbery and William Barney vice Thomas Tovey and John East.

West Wycomb . . George Hill and Edward Ford vice Joseph Burnham and Robert Lane.

Stoke hundred—

Datchett . . . . John Hill and William Early vice John Bradley and George Sterne.

Eaton . . . . John Hevell vice John Cooper, and William Kimber as tithingman vice Robert Randall.

The Gildables . . Thomas Woodward vice Richard Yones, and John Snapes as tithingman vice William Smith.

Fulmer . . . . Samson Hooke vice [Blank].

 

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Horton . . . . Walter Helperbey and John Richardson vice George Smith and Thomas Biddell.

Chalvey in Upton Robert Purser and Thomas Talbott vice [Blank] and Robert Gilbert, and Charles Dell of Chalvey Green as tithingman vice William Martin.

Wexham . . . . Henry Ward vice John Roberts.

 

Orders.

 

p. 359.  Order extending the recognizances of Gregory Browne, Henry Griffin, Richard Belson, and Simon Maund. 

Order estreating the recognizance of Thomas Symonds of Ivinghoe on account of his non-appearance to answer a charge brought by the overseers of Little Gaddesden, co. Hertford, concerning his dismissal of his apprentice, Mary Beech.

 

Order referring the rating appeal of Mr. John Loftings of Great Marlow to the justices for the hundreds of Desborough and Burnham.

 

p. 360.  Anthony Rutley of Stoke Hamond ordered to support his grandchild, Mary.

 

Further adjournment of the dispute between the borough and the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb.

 

Order referring the rating appeal of the Rev. [John] Davis, rector of Saunderton, to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury and Desborough. [See Vol. 5, p. 146.]

 

p. 361.  The surveyors of Ivinghoe authorized to raise a 3d. rate for the repair of their highways, and the surveyors of Winslowe similarly authorized to raise a 6d. rate.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Edgeworth against a warrant removing Mary Avis from Amersham.

 

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Order allowing the adjourned appeal of Upton against a warrant removing Mary Ladyman and her child from Burnham.

 

p. 362.  Order for the payment of quarter’s salaries to Matthew Annesley, John Rose, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers.

 

Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Walton-upon- Thames, co. Surrey, against a warrant removing Henry Rogerson, with his wife and child, from Stoke Poges. Evidence was given by Thomas Simons of Walton.

 

Order referring the rating appeal of Mr. Gerard Burnham of Long Crendon to the justices for the hundreds of Ashenden and Aylesbury.

 

p. 363.  Adjournment of the appeal of Chinnor, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing William Lansdell from Waddesden.  [See Vol. 5, p. 10.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Edlesborough against a warrant removing Jane Hitchcock from Ivingho.

 

The surveyors of Little Kimbell and Ellesborough authorized to raise 6d. rates for the repair of their high- ways.

 

p. 364.  Adjournment of the appeal of Winslow against a warrant removing John, son of Mary Hargett, from Wingrave. [ See Vol. 5, p. 8.]

 

Order referring the rating appeal of Dr. John Woodhouse of Ashley Green in Chesham to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern and Aylesbury.

 

p. 365.  The inhabitants of Chalfont St. Peters discharged from an indictment for non-repair of a highway upon pro- ducing a certificate that the work has now been done.  [See p. 309.]

 

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Order that Thomas Goodchild and Bartholomew Langley shall be committed to gaol until they pay their fines of £5 each for riot and assault.  [See p. 334.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Aston Clinton against a warrant removing Richard Chanceler from Wendover.

 

p. 366.  Order referring to certain justices the appeal of the inhabitants of Horton against a rate levied by Thomas Turpin, one of their petty constables.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Milbrook, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Damaris, daughter of Mary Hargett, from Wingrave.  [See Vol. 5, p. 9.]

 

p. 367.  Mary, wife of John Sudell, to be paid £3 for main- taining and “scholeing” Damaris Bright for a year.

 

p. 368.  Usual table of Servants’ wages, with one alteration: namely that the wages of “Free Masons by the day without meat and drink” are reduced from 1s. 8d. to 1s.  [See pp. 125-126.]

 

p. 369.  Usual order as to the rates for carriage of goods by land.  [See p. 127.]

 

The price of salt fixed at the same rate as for the last session.  [See p. 344.]

 

p. 370.  The justices for the hundred of Newport, to whom was referred the appeal of Sir Joseph Alston, Bt., against a recent order concerning the conveyance of “Cripples” between Loughton, Bradwell, and Woolverton, produced a report which gave insufficient evidence upon which the Court could base a decision.  The appeal was, therefore, referred back to them.  [See p. 314 and Vol. 5, p. 68.]

 

Geoffrey Savage of Winslow to be admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate, signed by Captain Henry Brown of Stratford-upon-Avon, co. Warwick, “sometimes Gentleman of the horse to the late right 

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honourable Spencer, Earle of Northampton, and afterwards to James, Earle of Northampton,” that he had served King Charles I under the command of both these Earls, and was now eighty-six years of age.

 

p. 371.  Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 14s. 8d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for thirteen weeks.

 

Rose Roberts, widow, to be allowed £6 a year out of the County stock.

 

William Church, a poor debtor in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for his maintenance.

 

Order that such of the treasurers who have not yet brought in their accounts shall do so before the next session.

 

p. 372. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The fines and committals of Thomas Goodchild and Bartholomew Langley, and the acquittal of Thomas Bromley. [See p. 334.]

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Pix (p. 302), Henry Lloyd and John Harding (p. 347).

Gregory Browne of Stoney Stratford West Side, cord- wainer, in £40, for his good behaviour.

Henry Griffin of Torcester, co. Northampton, baker, in £10, with John Snowe and Timothy Everidge, both of the same, gentlemen, as sureties in £10 each, in respect of a felony.

Richard Belson of Monks Risborough, yeoman, in £40, with Thomas Aldridge of the same and Simon Howlett of Little Kimble, maltster, as sureties in £20 each, for bastardy.

Simon Maund of Wendover, tanner, in £20, with Thomas Stevens of the same, butcher, and Henry Miles of Weston Tur- vile, victualler, as sureties in £10 each, for his good behaviour.

 

p. 373. Recognizances entered into.

Robert Hitchcock of Aylesbury, gentleman, in £40, with 

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EASTER SESSION, 1697

 

Richard Tombs, victualler, and Thomas Layton, husband- man, both of the same, as sureties in £10 each, in respect of the bastard child of Ann Thompson, widow.

Ann Ivatts of Fleet Marston, widow, in £20, with William Lee, carpenter, and John Kingham, “broad-weaver,” both of Aylesbury, as sureties in £10 each, for her good behaviour.

Richard Belson.  [Recognizance given above on p. 372.]

Bartholomew Langley of Dorney, yeoman, in £40, with John Ardin of Dorney, yeoman, and Jeremiah Goodchild of Great Marlow as sureties in £20 each, to keep the peace, and especially towards the Rev. Henry Atkinson.

Thomas Goodchild of Dorney, yeoman, in £50, with the same sureties as Langley in £25 each, for the same purpose.

 

p. 374. Fines and issues.

Thomas Norman of Shenley Brooke End and Richard Brinklow of Astwood fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of Thomas Goodchild and Bartholomew Langley.  [See p. 334.]

 

Recognizances discharged.

Ann, wife of Allen Wansall, Edward Porter of Hitcham, yeoman, Thomas Winslow of Brill, labourer, Robert Hitch- cock, gentleman, Richard Tombs, victualler, and Edward Parish, labourer, all of Aylesbury, Ann Ivatts of Fleet Marston, widow, William Lee, carpenter, and John Kingham, “broad-weaver,” both of Aylesbury, Anthony Ruttley of Stoke Hamond, yeoman, Henry Ridley, victualler, and William Heather, bargeman, both of Little Marlow, Richard Cotterill of Great Marlow, innholder, Thomas Mitchell and Withers Nicholls, farmer, both of Loughton, William Darcey, gentleman, Richard Cox, miller, and Thomas Dutton, victualler, all of Newport Pagnell, Ralph Smith of Bucking- ham, carrier, and George Lovell of Lillingstone Dayrill, labourer.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5

 

QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5.

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT CHESHAM

15th July, 1697 [9 William III]

 

p. 1. Jurors for the body of the county.

Henry Turner, gentleman, Robert Turner, Francis Denham, John Aldridge, Robert Tayler, Abraham Durrant, Thomas Ingram, Thomas Salmon, Christopher Theed, Thomas Walter, and Joseph Cock, gentlemen, Zachariah Deane, John Hill, Nathaniel Preist, and James Preist.

(signed) Richard Alkyn, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against John Wood.

John Parratt, William Birch, Jonas Harding, John Oakley, William Robinson, Joseph West, Richard Cottrell, Richard Amond, Samuel Jones, Samuel Littlepage, Ben- jamin Birch, and John Payne.

William Amond, Robert Pratt, James Harding, William Pollicott, Richard Ware, William Hunt, Samuel Littlepage, Daniel Carter, John Wilkinson, Nathaniel Edwards, Francis Price, and Thomas Burthwaite.

(signed) Richard Alkyn, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 2.  The Rt. Hon. Thomas, Lord Wharton, the custos rotulorum, and George Clewer of Chepping Wycomb, yeoman, took the statutory oaths.

Lord Wharton also took the oath contained in the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 27, with Charles Godfrey of Hunter- combe, esquire.

 

The house of Thomas Peacock of Lavendon, and that occupied by Bartholomew Barwick of Tickford End in Newport Pagnell, were registered as meeting houses.  The former was certified by Mr. Foster and the latter by Mr. Daniel Roberts.

 

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Duncan Campbell of Oakely was convicted of swearing six oaths, and Moses Smith of Ellesborough, labourer, of swearing ten oaths, the latter upon the evidence of William Eldridge.

 

p. 3. Indictments.

Henry Ridley senior, victualler, Henry Ridley junior, labourer, and William Carter, bargeman, all of Little Marlow, for rioting and assaulting Jonathan Medwin.  [Fined £1 each.]

Richard Lack, butcher, William Lack, innholder, and Catherine, his wife, all of Stoney Stratford, for rioting and assaulting Samuel Marriott.  [Richard and William fined 6s. 8d. each; Catherine fined 3s. 4d.]

John Parriott, bricklayer, constable of Stoney Stratford East Side, for refusing to keep the peace towards Samuel Marriott.  [Fined 6s. 8d.]

Christopher Andrews of Taplow, bargemaster, for refusing to be sworn constable in place of Thomas Allen.

Matthew Crane, blacksmith, constable of Wooborne, for refusing to execute a justice’s warrant and for secretly giving notice of the same to the accused persons.  [Fined 5 nobles (£1. 13s. 4d.).]

John Wood of Quainton, labourer, on five charges of larceny; namely for “stealing and carrying away the hair” from horses belonging to Richard Bettam, Robert Dancer, William Stevens, Henry Coker, and George Black- head.  [Not guilty.]

John Harris, alias Harrison, of Winslowe, yeoman, for having a dangerous chimney.

William King of Ellesborough, yeoman, for digging up turf at Combe Hill.

Peter Ward of St. Sepulchre’s, co. Middlesex, gentleman, William Tearly, Richard Preety, and Edward Gardner, all of Ivingho, yeomen, and Thomas Costin and Edward Stan- bridge, both of Edlesborrow, yeomen, for riotously breaking into the garden of John Edge at Edlesborrow and taking away a poplar tree, value £1. [See p. 28.]

 

Informations.

George Overett of Beachampton, Thomas Ingram of

 

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North Marston, John Peppyatt of Edlesborrow, John Rose and Thomas Rose, both of St. Margaret’s, Humphrey Mitchell of Buckingham, John Dodd and Thomas Coleman, both of Chesham, all labourers, and William Edge of Chesham, victualler, for trading as badgers without being lincensed.

 

p. 4. Presentments of the constables.

 

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, Ann Temple, Sir Edward Longviel, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Maybee, Ann Maybee, Frances Carter, Dorothy Walters, [Blank] Mosedall, Thomas Crumpton, Mary Brinkhurst, John Brinkhurst, Mary Barnes, and Richard Barnes, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Richard Groome of Hollingdon in Soulbury for unlaw- fully engrossing wheat at Stoney Stratford, his licence being four years old.

[Blank] Haughting, widow, and William George, both of Twiford, for lodging travellers, and the latter for abusing the constable.

The lord of the manor of Cheddington for not keeping his pound in repair.

Catherine Smith, Henry, her son, and Henry Cocke, all of Soulbury, for being suspected of setting the house of Thomas Grassam on fire, and for “divers thefts.”

William Hunt of Winslowe for refusing to assist Christopher Coats, the constable.

 

Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury, Lord’s  Thomas Read and Thomas Kempster Fee . . . .  vice Elisha Perrin and James Bates.

Newport hundred—

Stoney Stratford Peter Harris vice [Blank].

West Side

Burnham hundred—

Burnham town . . Simon Negos vice William Pontifex, and Thomas Taylor as tithingman vice John Vaugham.

Taplow . . . . Christopher Andrews vice Thomas Allen. 

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Orders.

p. 5.   Order extending the recognizances of Roger Pursill and William Pix.

 

The recognizance of Robert Hitchcock to be discharged, as the bastard child of Ann Thompson, in respect of which he was bound over, has since died.

 

Joan Smith of Great Horwood, who was bound over at the instance of the inhabitants of Wicken, to be discharged.

 

William Hilliar ordered to pay his servant, William Kitson, six months wages in lieu of notice.  He had agreed to pay £5. 10s. for a year’s wages but had dismissed him at the end of six months.

 

Order adjourning the case against William Hill of Chesham for “buying of live Cattle and selling them again.”

 

Further adjournment of the dispute between the borough and the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb.

 

p. 6.  Adjournment of the rating appeals of Mr. John Loftings of Great Marlow, Mr. Gerard Burnham of Long Crendon, and Dr. John Woodhouse of Chesham.

 

Order that a public vestry shall be held by the church- wardens and overseers of Thornborough in order that a vote may be taken to decide the most convenient place to build cottages for William Pooney and Edward Dimock, poor inhabitants with large families.  The overseers are also to pay Pooney 10s. a week for the maintenance of his mother and his six children, and Dimock 8s. a week for the main- tenance of his wife and five children.

 

p. 7.  The inhabitants of Ellesborough and Hugenden discharged from indictments against them for non-repair of highways upon producing certificates that the work has now been done.  [See Vol. 4, pp. 182 and 353.]

 

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Ann Dicks, widow, to be allowed 3s. a week by the over- seers of Thornborough.

 

p. 8.  Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Aylesbury and Cottesloe the appeal of Nash in Whaddon against an order to allow William Bowden and his wife 2s. 6d. a week.

 

Order for the return of all jury lists.

 

Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Winslowe against an order removing John, son of Mary Hargett, from Wingrave.

 

p. 9.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Milbrook, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Damaris, daughter of Mary Hargett, from Wingrave.

 

Order extending the recognizances of Henry Lloyd and John Harding.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Draiton Parslowe against a warrant removing Thomas Edmonds and Frances, his wife, from Linslad.

 

p. 10.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Chinner, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing William Lansdell, Elizabeth, his wife, and William Izzard, her son, from Waddesden.  [See p. 70.]

 

Order extending the recognizance of Henry Griffin.

 

Damaris Bright, “a County Child,” recently in the care of Mary, wife of John Sudell, ordered to be bound over by the overseers of Aylesbury as an apprentice to John Hawkes of Aylesbury, tailor, for seven years.  Hawkes is to be paid £15 out of the County stock when the indenture is signed.  [And see p. 30.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of John Rivers of Great 

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Marlow against a maintenance order in respect of the bastard son of Ann Ward, widow.

 

p. 11.  Order referring the rating appeal of William Hake- will of Wendover, gentleman, to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury.  [See p. 60.]

 

Thomas Symons of Ivingho to be bound over to appear and answer concerning the dismissal of his apprentice.

 

Philip Bayly, Daniel Coley, Joseph Harding, Francis Dorsett, George Jennings, and Richard Tring, all of Winslow, to be allowed £2 each in answer to their petition for relief. They stated that, on the 16th May, “there happened a dreadfull fire in the dwelling house of the said Daniel Coley which in the space of an hower burnt to the ground the dwelling houses and outhouses of the petitioners . . . by which unhappy Accident the said petitioners are utterly ruined.”

 

p. 12.  William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £1. 9s. 4d. “for the Clerk of the Assizes and his own fees due on the widdow Quaint, a prisoner in his Goal, upon her discharge,” £7. 12s. 5d. for repairs to the gaol, and £3. 15s. for taking ten prisoners to the Assizes.

 

Thomas Peirce, James Cole, John Lawrence, and Geoffrey Miles, poor debtors in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for their maintenance.

 

Order that all those who have disobeyed jury summonses shall be fined £1. 10s.

 

p. 13.  The inhabitants of Woolverton discharged from an indictment for non-repair of a highway upon producing a certificate that the work has been done.  [See Vol. 4, p. 208.]

 

Alexander Oliff to be paid £1. 14s. 8d. for maintaining 

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Alice Maxfield for thirteen weeks and £2 for clothing her for a year.

 

Henry Southen and Jane, his wife, to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Beachampton.  [And see p. 39.]

 

Giles Child to be allowed 2s. 6d. by the overseers of Amersham.

 

p. 14.  Order that a warrant shall be issued for the arrest of William Robinson of Quainton on the following charge. Robinson was empanelled as a juror to try the cases of larceny against John Wood, but he, “without consideration of his oath presumed to give evidence in behalf of the Prisoner” when called upon by him.  This was afterwards “discovered and resented by this Court as an ill practice,” and a new jury was empanelled, and the cases were re-tried, Robinson being allowed to give evidence for the prisoner. But, when the jury retired to consider their verdict, he, “by Combination with the Bayliff appointed to keep the said Jury did prevaile to be admitted amongst them and remained with them some time.”  Wood was subsequently acquitted.  [See pp. 23 and 57.]

 

Certain justices appointed to enquire of the overseers of Little Horwood why they have discontinued the allowance of 4s. a week to the wife of William Barton.  [See Vol. 4, p. 161.]

 

The allowance of Nathaniel Fryer of West Wycomb to be increased to 2s. a week.  [See p. 410.]

 

p. 15.  Matthew Annesley, John Rose, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their quarter’s salaries.

 

The treasurers ordered to have their accounts properly audited before the next session.  The clerk of the peace stated that this was the second order made to this effect, but that so far no notice had been taken of either of them.

 

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Further adjournment of the rating appeal of the Rev. John Davis, rector of Sanderton.

 

Henry Smith and Catherine Smith, who were committed to gaol on a charge of using threatening words, are to be discharged for want of a prosecutor.

 

p. 16. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Richard Lack, William Lack, and John Parriott, and the acquittal of John Wood.  [See p. 3.]

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Pix (Vol. 4, p. 302), Henry Lloyd and John Harding (Vol  4, p. 347), and Henry Griffin (Vol. 4, p. 372.)

Roger Pursill of Edlesburrowe, carpenter, in £5, with Thomas Herbert, victualler, and Edward Leach, yeoman, both of the same, as sureties in £5 each, for his appearance and that of Elizabeth Herbert to answer Thomas White.

John Harbour of Cookham, co. Berks, fisherman, in £20, with Richard Alnutt, carpenter, and John Tyler, labourer, both of the same, as sureties in £10 each, to appear and answer John Bigg and Richard Bigg.  Taken before John Whitfield, esquire, a justice for Berkshire.

 

p. 17. Recognizances entered into.

Henry Ridley senior, victualler, and Henry Ridley junior, labourer, both of Little Marlow, Matthew Crane of Wooburn, blacksmith, William Tearle of Ivingho, yeoman, and Edward Stanbridge of Edlesborrow, yeoman, in £40 each to appear and answer.

 

Fines and issues.

John Theed of Hugenden, Edward Butterfield of Barton Hartshorne, Robert Grainge and Thomas Ward, both of Little Horwood, and John Marriott of Haddenham, gentle- men, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of Richard Lack, William Lack and John Parriott.  [See p. 3.]

 

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p. 18. Recognizances discharged.

George Brown of Stoney Stratford West Side, cord- wainer, Richard Belson of Monks Risborough, yeoman, Simon Howlett of Little Kimble, Thomas Aldridge of Monks Risborough, Simon Maund, tanner, and Thomas Stevens, butcher, both of Wendover, Henry Miles of Weston Turvile, victualler, Robert Hitchcock, gentleman, Richard Tombs victualler, and Thomas Layton, husbandman, all of Aylesbury, Ann Ivatts of Fleet Marston, widow, William Lee, carpenter, and John Kingham, both of Aylesbury, Bartholomew Langley of Dorney, yeoman, Jeremiah Goodchild of Great Marlow, Thomas Goodchild and John Ardin, both of Dorney, yeomen, Joan Smith, widow, and William Harrope, yeoman, both of Great Horwood, Richard Olliffe, innholder, James Bates, victualler, and Edward Edwards, labourer, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Rowell of Nash, labourer, Richard Lack, butcher, William Lack, victualler, and John Parratt, brick- layer, all of Stoney Stratford, Thomas Gibbons, Richard Alnutt, architect, and John Taylor, labourer, all of Cookham, co. Berks, Joseph Child of Brandsfee in Hitchenden, yeoman, John Judge of Great Missenden, yeoman, William Hilliar of Fawley, gentleman, Philip Hillier of Sanderton, miller, Thomas Clarke and John Prentice, labourers, and Gabriel Prentice, carpenter, all of Wendover, Moses Smith, William King, and John Chrismas, all of Ellesborow, yeomen, Henry Ridley, senior, victualler, and Henry Ridley, junior, both of Little Marlow, Cornelius Latemore, labourer, William Haycrofte, cordwainer, John Rivers, innholder, and John Harris, senior, butcher, all of Great Marlow, Richard Dormer of Hambleden, wheeler, Edward Chowne, salter, and John Stevens, wharfinger, both of Great Marlow, Matthew Crane and Hugh Crane, both of Wooburn, blacksmiths, William Eldridge, blacksmith, William Allen, wheelwright, and William Neighbour, yeoman, all of Ellesborough, Thomas Goodchild, husbandman, and Richard Sedding, yeoman, both of Dorney, Joseph Gyles of Winslowe, haberdasher, William Stevens of Grandborough, yeoman, George Black- head, Richard Betham, Henry Cocker, Robert Dancer, and John Cock, all of North Marston, Samuel Marriott of Stoney Stratford, pipe-maker, Thomas Lane, innholder, and Mary 

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Saunders, spinster, both of Wendover, Henry Tayler of Fingest, tailor, and Edward Harding of Wooburn, tailor.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 19-20.  [Blank.]

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT AYLESBURY

7th and 21st October, 1697 [9 William III]

 

p. 21. Jurors for the body of the county.

Nathaniel Birch, gentleman, William Edmonds, Francis Whitchurch, Thomas Whitchurch, James Watts and Thomas Markham, gentlemen, Bartholomew Paxton, Edward Butterfield and John Wilkinson, gentlemen, Ralph Rice, Michael Goodman and Alden Fuller, gentlemen, William Mayne, James Harman, Matthew Nicholas, and William Duncombe and Francis Johnson, gentlemen.

(signed) Richard Alkin, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Henry Ridley, senior and junior, and Matthew Crane.

Henry Newell, John Plomer, Thomas Barraby, William Bynion, Bernard Chevall, John Windmill, Peter Goldsworth, John Very, Joseph Brasbridge, John Goldsworth, Matthew Hitchendon, and Thomas Brookes.

(signed) Richard Alkin, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 22.  Thomas Fellow of Chepping Wycomb, gentleman, and John Sefton of St. James’s, Westminster, took the statutory oaths, etc., including that contained in 7 and 8 William III, c. 27, and Hugh Shrimpton of Chepping Wycomb took the oaths as a Dissenter.

 

p. 23. Indictments.

William Hunt of Winslowe, labourer, for refusing to assist Christopher Coates, the constable.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

 

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Mary, wife of Francis Nixon of Wendover, victualler, for assaulting William Darvall and stealing a shilling from him.  [Removed by certiorari.]

Richard Webb, mealman, and Michael Greene, labourer, both of Brill, for breaking into the house of George Habbucks and assaulting Sarah, his wife; and for stealing a desk, a tankard, a table, and a chair, value £1, from him.  [Fined 10s. each.]

William George of Twiford, labourer, for entertaining vagabonds, and for abusing John Ring and Thomas Symons, the constables.

John Hill and William Dodson, both of Siddenham, labourers, for being “night-walkers and visiting the backside of John Lidgold, gentleman, in the night time.”  [Hill fined £1; Dodson fined 6s. 8d.]

Richard Groome of Hollingdon, yeoman, for engrossing ten quarters of wheat, value £1. 10s., at Stoney Stratford East Side.

Thomas Fox of New Windsor, labourer, for stealing seventeen chickens from Francis Gibbons.  [To be whipped; see p. 32.]

Edward Edwards of Aylesbury, labourer, for taking away two pigs which Henry Hawkins had put in the pound at Womans Bridge Field.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Humphrey Pantline and Henry Stevens, farmers, Henry Goss, cordwainer, Thomas Hawkins, Thomas Cartwright, John Snoxall, and William Greene, labourers, and Edward Dimock, yeoman, all of Soulbury, for rioting and over- turning the wagons of William Taylor.  [The first five fined 3s. 4d. each.]

William Robinson of Quainton, yeoman, for secretly speaking to a jury empanelled to try certain cases against John Wood, and for giving false information which obtained Wood’s acquittal.  [Not guilty; and see p. 14.]

 

p. 24. Informations.

Edward Richardson of Hugendon, John Clarke of Aylesbury, William Randall of Waxham, Robert Bennett of Chalfont St. Peter’s, John Brinklowe of Newton Longue- ville, and Charles Marshall of Iver, all labourers, Richard 

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Blake of Iver, tailor, and Richard Leach of Stoney Stratford and Richard Seaton of Winslowe, yeomen, for trading as badgers without being licensed.

 

p. 25. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, Ann Temple, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Elnathan Payne, John Oakley, Michael Anthony, [Blank] Mosdell, Thomas Crumpton, Mary Brinkhurst, John Brinkhurst, and Sir Edward Longvile, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Francis Nixon of Wendover for keeping an unlicensed alehouse and “a house of very ill name and fame.”

Henry Sanders, constable of Studly, and Richard Heritage and Henry Pinnock, constables of Woolverton, for not producing their presentments or their quarteridge money.

The lord of the manor of Cheddington for not keeping his pound in good repair.

John Mitchell of Ibstone in Turfield for selling beer on Sunday during Divine Service.

 

Presentment of the surveyors.

(By Thomas Lucas and Edward Hitchcock, surveyors of Dinton).

Richard Toms of Ford in Dinton for not sending his team for six days the repair of the highways.

 

p. 26. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Weston Turvile . . Nicholas Gerrard and Thomas Dover vice Richard Bate and Francis Turner.

Ashenden hundred—

Ludgershall . . John Bartholomew vice Robert Leaver.

Cottesloe hundred—

Aston Abbotts . . Thomas Hedges and Robert Greene vice John Bettam and John Bavin.

Drayton James Moreton vice Edward Seare.

Beauchamp

 

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Burnham hundred—

Chesham Boyes . . William Nash vice Henry Batcheler.

Chalfont St. Giles . . Benjamin Peed and Ralph Cook vice Robert Chersley and Richard Wilbey.

Chalfont St. Peters William Watkins vice Joseph Dagger and William Dearman as tithingman vice James Borrowes.

Penn . . . . William Burnham vice Richard Nash and John Hobbs as tithingman vice William Pissey.

Desborow hundred—

Wooburn . . . . David Pontifex and Francis Pepper vice [William Beck] and Matthew Crane, and John Burcott and Thomas Farmer as tithingmen vice [William Fenables and Geoffrey Reynolds].

 

Orders.

p. 27.  Order extending the recognizances of Henry Lloyd and Henry Griffin.

 

The surveyors of Weston Turvile and Beconsfield authorized to raise 6d. rates for the repair of their highways. 

p. 28.  Peter Ward, who was indicted at the last session with certain other persons for rioting and taking away a tree from John Edge [see p. 3], has obtained a writ of certiorari to remove his case to the King’s Bench.  But as neither he, nor any of his co-defendants, some of whom have entered into recognizances to be tried before this Court, have yet been “bound to the prosecutor in the penall summe of ten pounds with sufficient suretyes, as by the Statute in that behalf is required,” the Court postponed the return of the writ until the opinion of the Lord Chief Justice has been obtained as to what the next course should be.

 

In spite of the fact that several orders have been addressed to the treasurers, requiring them to produce their audited accounts to the clerk of the peace and to hand over the balance of their accounts to their successors, it is reported 

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that several of the treasurers have not yet done so.  This has led to great confusion in the carrying out of orders for the payment of money by the present treasurers, and “parties who should have had the benefitt of such payments have had great trouble and disappointment.”  It is finally ordered, therefore, that all such treasurers as are in default shall appear with their books and balances at the adjourned session on the 21st October, “as they will answer the con- tempt of this Order at their perills.”

 

p. 29.  Order estreating the recognizance of Henry Lloyd for not appearing to answer an indictment.

 

The case against Mary Nixon removed by writ of certiorari.  [See p. 23.]

 

James Hasell, bailiff for the hundreds of Chiltern, to be bound over to appear and answer for “misdemeanors in his office.”  Anthony Chapman, the under sheriff, appeared as his surety.

 

Order extending the recognizances of Henry Tudor and Thomas Simpskin.

 

Usual order for the payment of the bridewell-keepers’ salaries.

 

p. 30.  At the last session it was ordered that Damaris Bright should be bound by the parish of Aylesbury as an apprentice to John Hawkes.  But John Sudell and Mary, his wife, in whose care the child had been brought up, refused to part with her, alleging that she had “sometime before voluntarily placed herself with them as an Apprentice and [that] they might by Law detain her as their servant.”  Upon the matter being brought to the Court, the child “expressed some reluctance to depart from them and insinuated that shee might be continued in their service.” Sudell then suggested that, if he were to be given £8 out of the £16 paid to Hawkes, he would enter into an agreement to indemnify the parish of Aylesbury from the child ever become

 

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chargeable, and asked that his indenture with the child, which was for no consideration, should be confirmed.  After some deliberation the Court, with the consent of all the parties, agreed to this course, and Hawkes was allowed to retain the remaining £8 for his trouble.  William Church and Charles Noy stood as sureties for the indemnity in £20 each.  [See p.  10.]

 

p.  31.  Order extending the recognizance of Jane Beecham of Great Missenden, widow.

 

Further adjournment of the rating appeals of Mr. Loftings and Dr. John Woodhouse.

 

p.  32.  Order allowing the appeal of the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb against an order made concerning the conveyance of “cripples” [See Vol.  4, p.  254.].  This order directed that the cost of passing “cripples” and others through Chepping Wycomb should be “at the equall and joynt charge” of the Borough and the Forrens, the division of the cost being “according to the value of the Estates rateable in each place.”  The Forrens appealed against this order on the grounds that they had not received notice of the hearing and that the information upon which the decision was based was false.  Their appeal was referred to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern, who met at the Three Tuns at Great Marlow.  Mr. John Bigg, alderman and town clerk of the Borough, was present to represent the Borough.  The report of the justices upheld the contentions of the Forrens and declared that the order was setting up a procedure entirely contrary to ancient usage and inequitable to the Forrens. The Court accepted the report and cancelled the order.

 

p.  33.  Thomas Fox, found guilty of larceny, to “be stripped naked to his wast and fastened to the tayle of a cart and openly and publickly drawn from the Goal door through the Street of Aylesbury . . . to the George Inn and round by the George Sign Post and so back to the Goal door, and that the Executioner do whipp him till his body be bloody.” [See p.  23.]

 

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William Dodson committed to gaol until he pays his fine of 6s. 8d.  [See p.  23.]

 

p.  34.  Order allowing the appeal of Hawridge against a warrant removing Mary Boarder and her son from Chesham, where she had been a servant with Mr. Charles Philips.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Watford, co.  Hertford, against a warrant removing Henry Towerton and his family from Bledlow.

 

p.  35.  Further adjournment of the rating appeal of Mr. Davis, rector of Sanderton.

 

p.  36.  The fine imposed upon Richard Seare of Hawridge, gentleman, for non-attendance on a jury is remitted upon his plea that his absence was occasioned by “some extraordinary calls of his private affairs.”

 

The surveyors of Stoke Mandivile authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

Samuel Harland, a poor prisoner in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for his maintenance.

 

Order that 15s. shall be paid out of the County funds to obtain the discharge of Henry Smith from gaol.  In his petition he stated that he had been “acquitted upon his tryall at the last Assizes and [was] remaining in Custody for his Fees onely.”

 

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £1. 10s. 6d. for money “by him disbursed about the delivery and lyeing in of Alice Heritage, a prisoner under sentence of death in his custody.”

 

p.  37.  Mary Clarke of Aylesbury, widow, to be allowed 15s. for six weeks nursing, and £1 for clothing, the infant daughter of the above Alice Heritage.  The child was born in the gaol 

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and “was there baptized and by the Goaler’s care placed at Nourse” with Mary Clarke.  [See p.  71.]

 

Elizabeth Miles, widow, who is “above four score yeares of age and is visited with the Palsy,” complained that the overseers of Aylesbury refused to grant her any allowance unless her daughter, who “payes her house rent and administers to her without any relief from the said parish,”  agreed to wear “a badg according to the late Act of Parlia- ment relateing to the poor” [8 and 9 William III, c.  30, sec.  2.].  The Court ordered that the overseers shall pay Elizabeth Miles 9d. a week, “without insisting upon her daughters wearing any badg as one of their poor, unless they can make appear that by receiving allowance out of their poors Rate shee is made liable thereunto.”

 

p.  38.  The clerk of the peace ordered to pay, “out of Mr. Anthony Ratcliffs money now in his hands,” £1 a year each to William Burrall of Winslow, butcher, and William Leaver senior of Aylesbury, pin-maker, who petitioned for increases to their County pensions of £2 a year.

 

The clerk of the peace ordered to produce his accounts before certain justices.

 

p.  39.  Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks.

 

Order allowing the appeal of the overseers of Beachampton against an order requiring them to pay Henry Southen an allowance of 2s. 6d. a week.  Southen “could not upon his Oath contradict” that he was “of good ability” to maintain himself.  [See p.  13.]

 

Phyllis Perry of Aylesbury, widow, to be allowed 9d. a week by the parish.  It is also provided that “her daughter who administers to her be not obliged to wear a Badge, shee being excused by the late Act.”

 

p.  40.  Mr. John Spratley of Hillersdon, lately one of the 

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treasurers for the maimed soldiers, “whose accounts seem imperfect,” is ordered to attend the adjourned session to satisfy the Court as to the balance he handed over to his successor, William Giles.

 

John Wilson of Longwick in Prince Risborough to be admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate that he had served King Charles II “at the time of the Restoration . . . and afterwards . . . in the Character of an Ensign and of a Lieutenant in Tanger under the Com- mand of the right honorable William, late Earl of Insiquin.”

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Bierton against a warrant removing Alice Bowley, widow, and her two children from Monks Risborough.

 

p.  41.  Adjournment of the rating appeal of Mr. William Hakewill of Wendover, and of the appeal of Frances Price against a maintenance order in respect of her bastard daughter, of whom she claims Richard Belson to be the father.

 

p.  42.  Further adjournment of the appeal of Sir Joseph Alston against an order concerning the conveyance of “Cripples” through Woolverton, Bradwell, and Loughton.

 

p.  43.  Order extending the recognizance of James Beddall of Towersey, butcher, in respect of the bastard child of Elizabeth Rolls, spinster.

 

Order referring the rating appeal of Mr. John Wigson of Aylesbury to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury. [See p.  344.]

 

p.  44. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Henry Ridley, senior and junior, Catherine Lack, and Matthew Crane [see p.  3], and of William Hunt, Richard Webb, Michael Greene, William Dodson, and Thomas Fox [see p.  23].

 

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p.  45. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Pix (Vol.  4, p.  302), Henry Lloyd and John Harding (Vol.  4, p.  347), and Henry Griffin (Vol.  4, p.  372).

Henry Tudor of Padbury, cordwainer, and Thomas Simpskin, servant to Thomas Hilsden of Padbury, yeoman, in £20 each, to answer William Chaloner, gentleman.

Jane Beecham of Great Missenden, widow, in £20, with George Hickman of the same, yeoman, as surety in £20, for felony.

James Beddall of Towersey, butcher, in £20, with Richard Hunt of the same, yeoman, as surety in £20, for bastardy.

 

p.  46. Recognizances entered into.

Charles Champnoone of Wing, gentleman, and Thomas Short of Hogston, yeoman, in £20 each, for the appearance of Mary, wife of Francis Nixon of Wendover, tallow-chandler, in the King’s Bench.

James Hasell of Beconsfield, gentleman, in £20, for his good behaviour.

Humphrey Pantline and Henry Stevens, farmers, Henry Gosse, cordwainer, Thomas Hawkins, Thomas Cartwright, and John Snoxall, labourers, all of Soulbury, and William Robinson of Quainton, yeoman, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p.  47. Fines and issues.

John Newman of Hanslop, draper, Thomas Follett of Chitchley, Jonas Tayler of Hambleden and John Ferrers of Chepping Wycomb, gentlemen, and James Fish of Great Marlow, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

Thomas Thorne of Beirton, yeoman, forfeits his recog- nizance of £20 for non-appearance, and his sureties, William Hoare, cordwainer, and James Kirby, yeoman, both of Beirton, forfeit £10 each.

Henry Lloyd of Dorney, yeoman, and his surety, Richard Sudden, similarly forfeit £100 each.

The fines of the persons convicted on p.  44.

 

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p.  48. Recognizances discharged.

Roger Purzill, carpenter, Thomas Herbert, victualler, and Edward Leach, yeoman, all of Edlesborough, John Harbour, fisherman, Richard Alnutt, carpenter, and John Tyler, labourer, all of Cookham, co.  Berks, Henry Ridley senior, victualler, and Henry Ridley junior, labourer, both of Little Marlow, Matthew Crane of Wooburn, blacksmith, Jonathan Lancer, innholder, and William Stogdell, farmer, both of Slow in Upton, Henry Draywater of All Hallows, Berking, London, factor at Blackwell Hall, John Goodwin of Farnham Royall, victualler, John Lester, Robert Smith, and William George, all of Twiford, labourers, Harry Taylor of Quainton, yeoman, Richard Webb of Brill, mealman, William Robinson of Quainton, yeoman, John Naroway of Gritmore in Grendon Underwood, yeoman, John Snow and William Baldwin, farmers, John Bunce, Thomas Judge, John Gibbart, Thomas George, and Matthew Gibbert, labourers, Richard Judge, tailor, John Golden, cordwainer, and Edward George, blacksmith, all of Padbury, John Sudell, pipe-maker, John Stratford, victualler, and William Welch, butcher, all of Aylesbury, Francis Nixon of Wendover, tallow-chandler, George Baldwin of Aylesbury, gentleman, Humphrey Pantline and Harry Stevens, husbandmen, Thomas Cartwright, Thomas Hawkins, and John Snoxall, labourers, Henry Gosse, carpenter, Thomas Harris, yeoman, Matthew Samon, blacksmith, and John Winfield, carpenter, all of Soulbury, William Greene, Isaac Greene, and George Apslee, all of Cublington, yeomen, Thomas Cook junior, weaver, William Wyth, labourer, and William Buck, carpenter, all of Great Marlow, John Ludgall, yeoman, Thomas North, and William Welch, all of Cippenham in Burnham, Ann Gibbons of Dorney, Thomas Tayler of Soulbury, yeoman, George Habbucks of Brill, labourer, and William Challoner of Steeple Claydon, gentleman.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp.  49-50.  At the adjourned session, held at the Market Hall in Aylesbury, the Court considered a number of appeals against assessments to the window tax, “in pursuance of 

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a late Act of this present Parliament, intituled an Act for granting to his Majesty severall rates or duties upon houses, for makeing good the deficiency of the Clipped money” [7 and 8 William III, c.  18, as amended by 8 and 9 William III, c.  20, sec.  xv, etc.].  John Sefton and Robert Mountague, gentlemen, the inspectors for the County, were present in Court.  The results of the appeals were as follows:

Assessments reduced to 6s. a year: Arthur Crabb of Aylesbury, gentleman, John Bigg and Ralph Stone, both of Bledlowe, John King of Wendover, John Goodchild of Prince Risborough, and Edward Mundee of Ellesborow.

Assessments reduced to 2s. a year: [Blank] Hitchcock of Aylesbury, widow, Thomas Pilgrim of Aston Clinton, Robert Morris of Bledlowe, Thomas Stevens of Wendover, Francis Bowler of Longwick in Prince Risborough, Francis Bowler and Richard Wade, both of Prince Risborough, [Blank] Keen, widow, and Ralph Beeson, both of Monks Risborough, and Peter Crosse of Bierton.

Excused payment of tax “by reason of their poverty”: George Humphrey, [Blank] Philipps, widow, Henry Hoar, and Humphrey Spender, all of Wendover, Thomas Fornell, George Hawes junior, George Russell, and William Bradley, all of Brands Fee in Hugenden, Christopher Foster of Hartwell, Francis Bowler, Christopher Frewin, John Parker senior, John Parker junior, John Wiggen, John Newell, Thomas Allen, John Welhead, Edward Lacey, Jonathan Currier, Thomas Dossett, John Spredburrow, and Henry Cox, all of Prince Risborough, Margaret Moors of Weston Turvile, widow, Richard Belson of Monks Risborow, Thomas Baker, William Sheeney, Joseph Rodwell, Thomas Ames, and Francis Olliff, all of Bierton.

Appeals dismissed: John Weedon, Henry Worcester, and Edward Durrant, all of Aston Clinton, William Crismas, Edward Tayler, Thomas Barton, Richard Munday, John Pryor junior, and Edward Martin, all of Wendover.

 

p.  51.  William Dormer, a poor debtor in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for his maintenance.

 

Order making provision for certain justices to hear 

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further appeals from assessments to window tax before the next session.  Certain parts of the County had not yet been inspected or assessed, and those wishing to appeal were required to give a week’s notice.

 

p.  52. Indictment confessed.

The conviction of John Hill.  [See p.  23.]

 

Recognizances entered into.

John Goodchild of Princes Risborow, yeoman, in £20, with Edward Stone junior, yeoman, and Ralph Beeson, husbandman, both of Monks Risborow, as sureties in £10 each, for Goodchild to appear and answer a charge of perjury “concerning the number of his windows.”

John Sefton of the city of Westminster, co.  Middlesex, and Robert Mountague of Idlestry, co.  Hertford, gentlemen, in £10 each, to prosecute the above John Goodchild.

 

p.  53. Fine.

The fine of John Hill.  [See p.  23].

 

p.  54.   [Blank].

 

EPIPHANY SESSION

AT WENDOVER

13th January, 1697-98 [9 William III]

 

p.  55. Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Brookes, Alexander Dover, Michael Wells, Henry Webb, William Oliver, John Brangwin, Thomas Burnham, Thomas Scott, John Woolhead, John Perkins junior, John Grace, Thomas Woster, William Payne, Richard Reading, Joseph Turpin, Robert Hill, Edward Wetherley, Robert Wright, and John Goodman.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the case against William Robinson.

John Collins, Thomas Twynam, John Fellowes, John Whitchurch, Richard Barton, Thomas Oakley, Edward 

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Tompson, Joseph Stallwood, William Pratt, John Dennis, William Tilbury, and William Browne.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

p.  56.  Robert Mead, deputy sheriff, Peter Silver of Chepping Wycomb, and Geoffrey Ludlow of West Wycomb, gentlemen, took the statutory oaths, Thomas Wainwright of Winslowe took the oaths as a Dissenter, and all of them signed the “Association.”

 

The houses of Thomas Tarbucks of Hollingdon in Soulbury and Nicholas Lucas of Simpson were registered as meeting houses.

 

p.  57.  John Trulock of Marsh Gibbon, farmer, was convicted of swearing one oath, and was fined 2s.

 

The following officials took the oath contained in 27 Elizabeth, c.  12.—Robert Mead, gentleman, deputy sheriff, and John Johnson, Thomas Leach, William Parker, William Tompson junior, Isaac Beddall, and Thomas Read, bailiffs of the hundreds of Newport, Cottesloe, Ashenden, Bucking- ham, Chiltern, and Aylesbury, respectively.

 

Indictments.

James Hasell of Beconsfield, one of the bailiffs, for allowing William Robinson to speak privately to a jury under his charge.  [And see p.  14; fined £2.]

John Goodchild of Princes Risborow, yeoman, for perjury in connection with his assessment to the window tax.  [Indictment quashed, see p.  91.]

John Havergell of Fawley, husbandman, for hindering and molesting Phillip Drew, “collector of the King’s duty,” in the execution of his office.  [Not guilty.]

John Mitchell of Ibstone in Turfield, barber, and Francis Nixon of Wendover, labourer, for keeping disorderly houses. [Not guilty.]

John Clarke of Akely for refusing to send his team for the repair of the highways.

 

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p.  58. Informations.

Thomas Page, William Page, and John Page, all of Newton Longuevile, William Ells of Little Brickhill, Francis Grant of Dagnall, Joseph Saunders of Chepping Wycomb, John Dix of Olney, and Richard Webb of Brill, all yeomen, for trading as badgers without being licensed.

 

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes, [Ann] Howes, Finch Howes, now of Stoke Mandevile and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longevile, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Walters, [Blank] Mosedall, John Oakley, Elnathan Payne, Michael Anthony, Thomas Crompton, Mary Brinkhurst, and John Brinkhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Moses Bristowe and Robert Temple junior, both of Princes Risborough, for selling beer without a licence.

Thomas Allen of Stone for not doing his duty “for the King’s Carriage” and for not passing “cripples.”

Nicholas Arice, constable of Water Stratford, and Richard Rutley, constable of Hilsdon, for not bringing in their presentments or their quarteridge money.

Ambrose Tompson of Great Marlow for refusing to assist John Law, the constable, for being a “common quareller and fighter,” and for “emptying chamber potts into the King’s highway.

Elizabeth Tompson of Great Marlow “for a common Scold, and a sedicious woman for raising and reporting false and scandelous lyes against her Neighbours.”

 

p.  59. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury . . James Dell vice Thomas Read

Buckland . . . . Thomas Horwood vice Richard Dorrill.

Cottesloe hundred—

Wing . . . . Thomas Stevens and Thomas Gilbert vice [Christopher Hailey and William Waters].

Newport hundred—

Brickhill Bow . . Thomas Dell vice William Cooke

 

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Broughton . . . . John Page vice Gilbert Pickring

Wavendon . . . . John Bigg vice William Hootton.

Burnham hundred—

Boveney . . . . John Turner vice Henry Ball, and Matthew Hunt as tithingman vice John Sandey.

East Burnham . . Thomas Todd vice John Stiles.

Penn . . . . John Frier as tithingman vice Paul King.

 

Orders.

p.  60.  Order that the names of those who have been called to serve on the grand jury but have made default shall be handed to the Chairman on the first day of each session.

 

Order, upon the report of the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury, allowing the rating appeal of William Hakewill of Wendover, gentleman, and providing that he shall in future be assessed at £75, and not at £85, for his tithes in Wendover.

 

p.  61.  Order for the release from gaol of Frances Price, who was committed for refusing to pay 1s. a week to the overseers of Hitchenden for the maintenance of her infant daughter, Frances.  She charges Richard Belson of Ascott, labourer, as being the father of the child, and the question of the future maintenance of the child was referred to certain justices.

 

p.  62.  At the last Epiphany Session the appeal of Drayton Parslow against a warrant removing William Chantrell from Stewkley was dismissed, and the order of the Court was that Chantrell was to be settled as an inhabitant at Drayton Parslow [See Vol.  4, p.  340.].  Chantrell now complained that Robert Cutler and Ralph Bull, the overseers of Drayton Parslow for last year, and John Hitchcock and Robert Willison, this year’s overseers, have refused to provide any habitation for him and have refused to give him a certificate of his settlement so that he might go elsewhere and work at his trade of carpenter.  John Coles, overseer of Stewkley, supported his complaint.  The Court ordered that all the

 

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overseers of Drayton Parslow should be bound over to appear at the next session to answer the above allegations.

 

p.  63.  Order estreating the recognizances of the following, on account of their non-appearance: John Harding and Robert Boveingdon, both of Dorney, husbandmen, Henry Griffin of Torcester, co.  Northampton, baker, John Snowe and Timothy Everidge, both of London, gentlemen, and Jane Beecham of Great Missenden, widow.

 

Order for the release of Gabriel Prentice from gaol, and Ann Johnson from the bridewell at Aylesbury.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Marsh Gibbon against a warrant removing Elizabeth Mushett, alias Thrustin, from East Cleydon.

 

p.  64.  The surveyors of Long Crendon authorized to raise a 2d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

p.  65.  Order dismissing the appeal of Laurence Waltham, co.  Berks, against a warrant removing Robert Style and his wife from Stoke Poges.  Evidence was given by William Greene, overseer of Stoke Poges.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Ellesborough against a warrant removing Joseph Saunders and his family from Brill.

 

p.  66.  Order extending the recognizances of William Pix, Henry Tudor, Thomas Simpson, James Beddall.  Henry Mowday, John Snoxall, and Joseph Johnson.

 

The overseers of Thornborough authorized to build cottages for the poor upon the waste of the manor, at Mortar Pit Leys near the Saw Pit, upon producing the consent in writing of Sir Richard Temple, Bt., and William Temple, esquire, “Lords of divers Mannors within the parish.”

 

Order discharging the recognizance of William Addams of Havering, co.  Essex, in respect of the bastard daughter of 

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Joyce Pickett of Great Horwood, spinster.  The recognizance was taken before Henry Mildmay, esquire, one of the justices for Essex.

 

p.  67.  Order that the record of the appeals against assess- ment to window tax, which were heard by certain justices in accordance with an order made at the last session [see p.  51], shall be filed amongst the records of the Court, and that the clerk of the peace shall see that the necessary alterations are communicated to the collectors.

 

p.  68.  Final order that the order made at the Michaelmas session, 1696, concerning the conveyance of “cripples” between Bradwell, Woolverton, and Loughton, shall be confirmed, “any interlocutory Orders obteyned since from this Court to the contrary notwithstanding.”  [See Vol. 4, pp.  314 and 370.]

 

p.  69.  Order referring back for further evidence the report of certain justices upon the rating appeal of the Rev. John Davies, rector of Sanderton.

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury the rating appeal of Thomas Olliff of Aylesbury.

 

p.  70.  The inhabitants of Chinner, co.  Oxford, having obtained a writ of certiorari, all the orders in the case are to be returned to the King's Bench.  [See p.  10.]

 

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, petitioned to be repaid certain money which he had been forced to disburse in the following manner.  Last February “twelve men imprest for his Majesties service at sea were sent to him by severall deputy Lieutenants and Justices of the Peace of this County to be kept at his charge untill they were from thence removed in order to be put on board his Majesties Navy Royall.”  He kept the men several weeks and spent about £10s. 10s. on their maintenance, “for which he hath had no allowance, the late Sheriff pretending he had no money in his hands.”  He pointed out to the Court that 

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“he being an Officer could not contend with the Orders that required him to retain the said men, nor avoid the giveing them the imprest money and subsistence his Majestie had appointed,” and he asked to be reimbursed out of the County funds.

“The Justices present unanimously agreed that this matter was not proper for this Court to intermeddle with, in regard that the letters from the Lords of his Majesties most honorable privy Council requiring the impresting of those Seamen had provided another Method for reimbursing the Sheriff . . . Nevertheless that no Officer of the County may receive any discouragement in his Obedience to the Government but receive all the Countenance and Assistance from this Court that may Consist with Justice,” it was ordered that the whole matter should be referred to certain justices who were to report to Lord Wharton, the custos rotulorum, “to the End his Lordship may give such directions concerning the same as to his great wisdom shall seem fit.”

 

p.  71.  Mary Clark of Aylesbury, widow, to be paid £1. 13s. 9d. for nursing and for burying the bastard child of Alice Heritage.  [See p.  37.]

 

John Tayler, Thomas Battie, and Thomas Hobbs, poor debtors in the gaol, to be “admitted to an allowance of the County bread with the King’s Prisoners.”

 

Rose Roberts, late of Oldwick, and now of Swanburn, widow, to be given an allowance of £2 a quarter out of the County funds.  She produced a certificate from the Rev. John Pilkington, the vicar of the parish.

 

p.  72.  The petition of Sarah Quinter of Ellesborow to receive an allowance is referred to certain justices.

 

John Moors and his wife to be allowed 2s. a week by the overseers of Great Missenden.

 

The petition of John Lucas and Isabella, his wife, both of Aylesbury, to receive an increased allowance is referred to certain justices.

 

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p.  73.  Arthur Salisbury to be allowed 1s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Wooburn.

 

The overseers of Abbotts Aston ordered to provide work for Richard Parker, smith, who alleges that “the inhabitants slight him and will not make use of him.”

 

Order referring the rating appeal of Mr. William Gilmore of Great Missenden to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury.

 

p.  74.  Edmund Durrant to be allowed 2s. a week by the overseers of Ivinghoe.

 

Order that “9d. per diem in bread” shall be provided out of the County funds for the support of Jaques Falon and his family, who were sent to the gaol in the following circumstances.  Falon, “a Foreighner travelling with his wife and family through this County in Order to Embarque for Ireland, happened dangerously to wound a man,” for which he was committed to gaol until “delivered by due Course of Law.”  His family were forced to follow him to the gaol as, “being Strangers, [they] cannot be legally settled in this Kingdom.”

 

Order for the payment of the salaries of Matthew Annesley, John Rose, and Henry Munday, the bridewell- keepers.

 

p.  75.  Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

 

The clerk of the peace to be paid £39. 1s. 1d. on his accounts, upon the report of certain justices who had audited them.

 

p.  76.  Order fixing the price of English salt at 4s. 6d. a bushel, and of foreign salt at 6s. a bushel.  [See Vol.  4, p.  285].

 

“At this Sessions, by the unanimous Consent of the 

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Bench and grand Jury, the following Address was most cheerfully signed by them all, and ordered to be registered with the Acts of this Sessions.

“To the Kings most excellent Majestie.  The humble Address of your Majesties Justices of the Peace and the Grand Inquest of your County of Bucks . . .

“Great Sir, at our first publick meeting after your Majesties happy return from infinite dangers to which your sacred person so often hath been exposed for our sakes as well as the Common good of Christendome, We lay at your Royal Feet our hearts full of Joy for your safety and the blessing of an honorable peace which we hope your Majestie may long enjoy with us and never more hazard your Royall person abroad.  When we call to mind how by your wise Conduct we have been rescued from Popery and Arbitrary power and protected in our just rights and Liberties, these resentments cannot but melt the most ungratefull of your people to a willing obedience and render your Majestie no less a Conqueror at home then you have appeared abroad, so that in all future Ages Cronicles will worthily Characterize you to be The true defender of the faith, The deliverer of oppressed Nations, and the Redeemer and Asserter of the Common Liberties of Europe.  We only Begg leave to add our hearty Prayers That Heaven would long continue to us such a Monarch and your people alwayes pay your Majestie the tribute of Loyalty so justly due to the best of Princes, which in our severall Stations we doe assure your Majestie we shall alwayes promote to the utmost of our power.”

 

p.  77.  Edmund Butterfield of Barton Hartshorn, gentleman, presented by the highway surveyors for not bridging a ditch on a footpath leading to Biscester, co.  Oxford, near the field belonging to Bartholomew Paxton.

 

Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of James Hasell [see p.  57], Humphrey Pantline, Henry Stevens, Thomas Hawkins, Henry Goss, Thomas Cartwright, and Edward Edwards [see p.  23], and Thomas Kempe [see Vol.  4, p.  334]; and the acquittal of William Robinson [see p.  23].

 

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p.  78. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Pix (Vol.  4, p.  302), Henry Tudor, Thomas Simpskin, and James Beddall (p.  45).

John Snoxall of Soulbury, labourer, in £40, to appear and answer.

Henry Mowday of Eaton, farmer, in £20, with William Noake of Burnham, yeoman, as surety in £20, to appear and answer Joseph Johnson of Eaton, farmer.  The last bound over in £40 to appear and prosecute.

 

p.  79. Recognizances entered into.

Edward Richardson of Wooton Underwood, farmer, in £20, to return to John Makepeace, his late servant, a “coffer and all his wearing clothes,” and to appear at the next session.

John Coles of Stewkley, farmer, in £20, to prosecute Robert Cutler, Ralph Bull, John Hitchcock, and Robert Willison, and William Chantrell of Drayton Parslow, carpen- ter, in £20, to appear and give evidence.

Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, in £40, with Thomas Goodchild and Bartholomew Langley, both of the same, yeomen, as sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer.

John Goodchild and William King, both of Princes Risborough, yeomen, John Havergill of Fawley, farmer, and John Mitchell of Ipston in Turfield, barber, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p.  80. Fines and issues.

Robert Eeles of Brill, Michael Goodman of Astwood, and Henry Newman and John Scriven, both of Hanslop, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

John Harding of Dorney, husbandman, forfeits his recog- nizance of £20 for non-appearance, and his surety, Robert Boveingdon of Burnham, husbandman, also forfeits £20.

Henry Griffin of Torcester, co.  Northampton, baker, similarly forfeits £10, and his sureties, John Snowe, Timothy Everidge, both of London, gentlemen, £10 each.

Jane Beecham of Great Missenden, widow, similarly 

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forfeits £20, and her surety George Hickman of the same, yeoman, forefeits £20.

The fines of the persons convicted on p.  77.

 

p.  81. Recognizances discharged.

Henry Lloyd, gentleman, Richard Sedwin, yeoman, and Charles Palmer, gentleman, all of Dorney, James Hasell of Beconsfield, gentleman, William Philipps of Colebrooke, innholder, William Filby, farmer, and Jane, his wife, and Robert Trott and Robert Stopp, farmers, all of East Burnham, John Goodchild of Princes Risborow, yeoman, Edward Stone junior, yeoman, and Ralph Beeson, husbandman, both of Monks Risborow, Thomas, son of Robert Newens, William Collier, James Brandon, and John Cox, labourers, Elizabeth, wife of John Worcester, labourer, and William Sharp, black- smith, all of Aylesbury, Thomas Brincklowe and Matthew Brincklowe, both of Newton Longvile, yeomen, William Addams, farmer, and Samuel Church, yeoman, both of Havering, co.  Essex, Richard Tayler, labourer, Thomas Mills, cordwainer, William Rawlins, yeoman, and Thomas Hicks, John Truelock, Richard Tucker, and John Parker, farmers, all of Marsh Gibbon, Edward Richardson, Edward Wright, and Richard Hows, all of Wooton Underwood, farmers, Thomas Paxon, labourer, and Thomas Reynolds, farmer, both of Wescott in Wadsdone, John Havergill of Fawley, yeoman, Thomas Havergill of Henly, co.  Oxford, John Webb of Fawley, husbandman, Humphrey Pantline and Henry Stevens, farmers, Thomas Hawkins and Thomas Cartwright, labourers, and Henry Gosse, cordwainer, all of Soulbury, William Robinson of Quainton, yeoman, John Boyle, William Mackoon, George Marry, Thomas Emns, Conyers Parrott, gentleman, Thomas Francis, gentleman, and John White and William Parker, yeomen, all of Marsh Gibbon, John Bowler of Wescott in Waddesden, farmer, and William Whitemeal of Woodham in Waddesden, higler.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p.  82.  [Blank.]

 

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EASTER SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

5th May, 1698 (10 William III]

 

p.  83. Jurors for the body of the county.

Francis Bowry, William Brookes, and William Green- wood, gentlemen, Ephraim Holt, Robert Reynolds, Edward Munday, Peter Hughes, John Woodbridge, William Tipping, Thomas Newman, Henry Ward, John Sawell, John Peele and William Smith, gentlemen, James Norwood, William Statham, and William Hakewill, gentleman.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against John Mitchell, John Havergill, and Thomas Stapers.

Joseph Smith, John Strong, John Barrowby, Richard Welch, John Hill, Joseph Parish, William Glenister, William Ellement, Nathaniel Carter, Daniel Browne, Hugh Dorrell, and John Tripp.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

p.  84.  The following presented sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association”: Philip Prince of Aylesbury, esquire, captain of a troop, John Rivers of Thame, co.  Oxford, gentleman, a cornet, and Richard Deane of Thame and Ralph Kelsall of Aylesbury, gentlemen, quartermasters, in the Duke of Schomberg’s Regiment of Horse; Abraham Carter and Thomas Hunter, bailiffs of Chepping Wycomb; and Winwood Serjeant of Chepping Wycomb, esquire.

 

The houses of following were registered as meeting houses: William Ashby of Northall in Edlesborough, Robert Greenough of Datchett, John Rawlins of Stoke Goldington, and John Carter of Olney.

 

p.  85. Convictions of swearers.

John Clark of Wescott in Waddesden, farmer, fined 6s. for 3 oaths; Thomas Betts of Ellesborough fined 2s. 

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for one oath; and Peter Mopsley of Denham fined 1s. for one oath.

 

Indictments.

Edward Butterfield of Barton Hartshorne, gentleman, for not repairing a footbridge.

Edward Fryer of Little Missenden, yeoman, for assaulting Ananias Barnaby.  [Not guilty.]

Nicholas Aris, labourer, constable of Water Stratford, and Richard Rutley, yeoman, constable of Hilsdon, for not handing over the money collected by them for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea to Thomas Grimes, chief constable. [See p.  144.]

Moses Bristow and Robert Temple junior, both of Princes Risborow, labourers, for keeping unlicensed alehouses.

William Veerey, gentleman, and Jane, his wife, and Mary Burrowes, all of Cuddington, for stealing a cock from Grace Burnham, widow.  [William Veerey fined 13s. 4d., and Jane Veerey discharged.  Mary Burrowes fined 3s. 4d.]

John Austin of Ludgarshall, miller, for assaulting Thomas Coleman.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Thomas Stapers of Great Marlow, labourer, for stealing four pieces of wood from John Stevens.  [To be whipped; see p.  106.]

Samuel Tompkins of Slapton, labourer, for assaulting Thomas Radwell, the constable.

Thomas Lewes of Wendover, esquire, for not sending teams for the repair of the highways.

Thomas Haynes of Brill, labourer, for keeping an un- licensed alehouse.

 

p.  86. Presentment of the grand jury.

Thomas Stevens of Chedington, yeoman, for digging up part of the Common at Mareway.  [Quashed; see p.  110.]

 

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, Finch Howse and his wife, Sir Edward Longdeviel, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, 

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Dorothy Waters, [Blank] Mosdell, Thomas Crumpton, Mary Brinkhurst, and John Brinkhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Ann Todd, widow, and James Brandon, both of Aylesbury, for keeping disorderly alehouses.

William Warden, constable of Little Kimbel, for not bringing in his presentments or his quarteridge money.

William King of Ellesborough for digging up turf from the Common, for cutting wood in Charlewood, a common wood, and for “setting of Steele Traps underground in the said Common and covering them over so that they lay there unseen.”

Richard Mullard of Stoney Stratford East Side, labourer, for trading as an ironmonger without due apprenticeship, contrary to the provisions of 5 Elizabeth, c.  4.

Thomas Johnson of Eton for digging up and carrying away twenty loads of soil from the Common.

 

p.  87. Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . . . Edward Stone of Ascott in Monks Risborough and William Hill of Beir- ton vice Edward Lamborn and William Lea.

Newport . . . . Thomas Cook of Simpson and Thomas Cooper of Newport Pagnell, draper, vice John Cooke and Thomas Withers.

Buckingham . . Richard Harris of Westbury and Stephen Greaves of Padbury vice Thomas Grimes and Richard Wise.

Cottesloe . . William Gawfield of Rowsham in Win- grave and William Illing of Little Horwood vice William Addams and Edward Hawkins.

Ashenden . . . . John Griffin of Wescott in Waddesden and George Harris of Brill vice Thomas Holt and John Randall.

Stoke . . . . John Jemmott of Denham and Thomas Bowrey of Horton vice Robert Smith gentleman, and Richard Ladbrooke.

 

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Desborough . . John Plomer of West Wycomb, gentleman, and Thomas Denham of Shog- more in Hambleden vice George Shrimpton and James Harmon, gentleman.

Burnham. . . . Henry Moreton of Agmondisham and Henry Ball of Huntercomb in Burn- ham vice David Salter and Matthew Nicholas.

 

pp.  88-90. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury . . . . John Ginger vice Thomas Kempster.

Bishopstone . . Michael Andrew vice Thomas Tompson.

Brands Fee in Moses Biscoe vice John Shrimpton.

Little Missenden

Cuddington . . James Ross vice William Dixon.

Ellesborough . . John Hitchcock vice William Neighbour.

Halton . . . . Thomas Hoar vice William Mountague.

Hartwell . . . . Christopher Foster vice John Horton.

Hulcott . . . . Thomas Adkins vice Francis Inkersole.

Little Kimbell . . Simon Howlett vice William Warden.

Great Kimbell . . John Topping and William Carter vice John West and Edward Smith.

Lee . . . . John Howes senior vice Edward Payne.

Little Missenden William Line vice John Garrett.

Monks Risborow Thomas Aldridge and Joseph Dancer vice Thomas Syred and Charles Clarke.

Walton . . . . Thomas Clarke and Robert Humfry vice Thomas Bigg and Thomas Dover.

Weston Turvile . . Joseph Smith and John Browne vice Thomas Dover and Nicholas Gerrard.

Newport hundred—

Blechley . . . . John Emerton vice Thomas Norris.

Bradwell . . . . John Hoar vice John Winmill.

Calverton . . William Polter and William Sturch vice Ralph Rutland and Thomas Watkins.

Cold Brayfield . . Richard Beal vice Richard Spencer.

Clifton Reynes . . John Pearson vice John Sharp.

 

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Lavenden . . Thomas Sincoe and John Warrin vice Francis Goodwin and John Lambert.

North Crawley . . Samuel Fensham and William Williamson vice William Leverett and Robert Nash.

Little Crawley in North Crawley William Noaks vice John Glidwell.

 

Newton Longvile  Alden Fuller and Geoffrey Heart vice William Page and Abraham Cook.

Middleton Keynes Henry Lancaster vice Thomas Kent.

Simpson . . . . Richard Goodman junior vice Henry Page.

Stoney Stratford East  John Leach vice John Parratt.

Stoke Hamond . . Anthony Rutley and Thomas Johnson vice William Fountaine and Francis Payne.

Water Eaton . . Richard Fowler vice Thomas Stratton.

Walton . . . . Roger Goss vice John Honybourn.

Wavendon . . . . William Tompkins vice William Hootton.

Great Woolston . . John Dudley vice Richard Dudley.

Little Woolston . . Thomas Binyon vice Edward Perry.

Buckingham hundred—

Adstock . . . . Robert Bowden vice Thomas Everett.

Twyford . . . . Francis Ayres vice Thomas Smith.

Ashenden hundred—

Kingsey . . . . Thomas Harris vice William Flitt.

North Marston . . John Bennill and Ralph Stevens junior vice John Cox and Edward Oviatts.

Lower Winchenden John Lowe vice Richard Buckingham.

Oveing . . . . Edward Coles vice William Scott.

Waddesdon . . Thomas Rice and Anthony Holey vice William Maine and [Thomas Matthew].

Westcott . . Thomas Green vice Thomas Reynolds.

Wootton Underwood Edward Wright vice Edward Richard- son.

Wornall . . . . Jeremiah Winter vice James Roberts.

Cottesloe hundred—

Cublington . . Thomas Mitchell senior and Henry 

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Grace vice George Apsley and Richard Broughton.

Mentmore . . . . John Jane and John Greene vice James Collett and William Lathwell.

Mursley . . . . William Gurney and Richard Pettison vice George Bayley and John Hall.

Nash . . . . George Eeling junior vice Robert Hobbs.

Stewkley . . Benjamin Tofield vice [William Bates].

Swanburn . . . . William Deverill senior and Robert Carter vice James Franklin and Robert Parrott.

Wingrave . . Richard Harley vice William Whitehall

Burnham hundred—

Beconsfield . . George Tomson junior and John Preston vice Edward Lack and John Young, and Thomas East and Robert Moors as tithingmen vice Arthur Tredway and Edward Piercy, alias Bemont.

Cheynes . . . . Ralph Scudamore vice Thomas Port.

Dorney . . . . John Cordwell vice Eusebius Windsor.

Penn . . . . John Hobbs as tithingman vice John Fryer.

Desborow hundred—

Braddenham . . John Springall vice Robert Morris.

Hambledon . . John Freeman and Abraham Gray vice Hugh Wickins and Peter Rider, and John Edwards as tithingman vice William Whiteaves.

Hitchenden . . John Theed vice John Fastnidge.

Little Marlow . . George Honnor vice Richard Silver.

Medmenham . . John Eels junior vice Richard Harding.

Turvile . . . . Thomas Fowler as tithingman vice John Mitchell.

Ibstone in Turfield Ralph Roles vice William Barney.

West Wycomb . . Peter Chalfont and Richard Hobbs vice George Hill and Edward Fourd.

Stoke hundred—

Datchett . . . . John Carter and Edward Dearle vice John Hill and Joseph Besouth.

 

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Eton, The Gildables Thomas Andrews junior vice Thomas Woodward.

Eton . . . . Richard Talbert vice John Hevell, and Thomas Randall and John Bauding as tithingmen vice William Kimbar and John Snapes.

Fulmer . . . . Thomas Bigg vice George Stanley.

Hugeley . . . . Thomas Craft vice William Turner.

Horton . . . . Edward Tring and William Bulpitt vice John Richardson and George Smith, and Joseph Fullmer as tithingman vice [Blank].

Chalvey in Upton Robert Gilbert vice Robert Persor.

Waxham . . Thomas Streeting vice Henry Ward.

 

Orders.

p.  91.  Before the grand jury was charged, the royal proclamation “for preventing and punishing immorality and profaneness was openly and publicly read.”

 

Order that the indictment against John Goodchild should be quashed, but that another should be prepared by the clerk of the peace and submitted to the grand jury. [See p.  57.]

 

Order allowing the appeal of Carrington, co.  Bedford, against a warrant removing John Simons and Mary, his wife, from Aston Abbotts.

 

p.  92.  Order allowing the appeal of Weston Underwood against a warrant removing Susan Costin from Olney.

 

The inhabitants of Little Woolston complained to the Court that William Jackson had refused to obey an order for his removal to Great Woolston and asked that he should be committed to the bridewell for contempt.  On the motion of Great Woolston, the hearing of the case was adjourned. [See Vol.  4, pp.  125 and 337].

 

p.  93.  Order allowing the appeal of Heath and Reach, co. 

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Bedford, against a warrant removing Henry Smith from Soulbury.

 

Order for the payment of the salaries of Matthew Annesley, John Rose, and Henry Munday, the bridewell- keepers.

 

p.  94.  General order for the arrest of Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, who was accused, on the evidence of Joseph Street of Dorney, “of haveing uttered Treasonable words against the person of his most sacred Majestie King William the Third, and is a person disaffected to the Govern- ment as now established, and of wicked and dangerous principles.”  The order was issued because the Court had been informed that Lloyd "privily lurks and hides himself in divers obscure places of this County not easily to be discovered."

 

Order allowing the appeal of Redbourne, co.  Hertford, against a warrant removing William Osmon and Alice, his wife, from Lincelade.

 

p.  95.  Order referring the rating appeal of John Reynolds of Munks Risborow, gentleman, to the justices for the hundred of Aylesbury.

 

p.  96.  Order referring the rating appeal of Thomas Johnson and other inhabitants of Eton to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern.  [See p.  124].

 

Order extending the recognizance of John Snoxell.

 

Order referring to certain justices the petition of Winifred Reeve, widow, to receive some allowance from the overseers of Nash in Whaddon.

 

p.  97.  Order referring to Sir John Holt, Lord Chief Justice, certain legal points in the appeal of Wingrave against a warrant removing Daniel, son of John Lucas, from Aylesbury.  [See pp.  128, 152, and 233].

 

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pp. 98-101.  Long order reciting the provisions of the various laws in force referring to the searching out, arrest, punishment, and passing of “Rogues, Vagabonds, and Sturdy Beggars” [See 39 Elizabeth, c. 4, and c. 17;  1 James I, c. 4 and c. 7].  The order was made in view of the grand jury’s information to the Court that “the dayly Concourse and great increase of Rogues, Vagabonds, and Sturdy Beggars is a great Grievance and Annoyance to the inhabitants of this County . . . the Consequences whereof may prove very dangerous.”

 

P. 102.  Thomas English of Bradenham was committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb for leaving his wife and family chargeable to the parish, and the parish had already spent 10s. on their maintenance since his committal.  The overseers, therefore, asked the Court if they could be reinbursed out of the rent of £4. 10s. a year which English received from a house owned by him in Bradenham, and now occupied by Mr. Jacob Loveday.  The request was granted by the Court, which ordered Loveday to pay the money direct to the overseers.

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundred of Buckingham the petition of Margaret Farthing to be paid some allowance by the overseers of Water Stratford.

 

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Anthony Fenn, labourer, from Buckland to Pankeridge, co. Middlesex.

 

p. 103.  Order supporting the complaint of Fenny Stratford “that they are interrupted and disturbed in the Conveying of Cripples to Bow Brickhill by the wayes that have been heretofore used,” and directing that Bow Brickhill should not “give any further trouble or interruption.”  [See pp. 126 and 264].

 

Order that the cases against William King of Princes Risborough should be removed into the King's Bench by writ of certiorari.

 

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p. 104.  “Whereas the Kings most Excellent Majestie, out of a deep sence of the great Goodness and mercy of Almighty God in putting an End to a long bloudy and expensive war by the Conclusion of an Honorable peace and that, notwith- standing this and many other great blessings and deliverances, Impiety, Prophaness, and Immorality do still abound in this Kingdom to the high displeasure of Almighty God, the great Scandal of Christianity, and the ill and fatall Example of persons who have been soberly educated, out of his Princely zeal to the Honour of God and the Good and welfare of his Subjects and that Religion, Piety, and good manners may flourish and increase under his administration and Government has by his Royall Proclamation strictly charged and Commanded all the Judges, Mayors, Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace and all other Officers and Ministers both Ecclesias- ticall and Civil and others whom it may concern to be very vigilant and strict in the discovery and the effectuall prosecution and punishment of all persons who shall be guilty of Excessive drinking, Blasphemy, Prophane Swearing and Curseing, Lewdness, Prophanation of the Lord’s day, or other dissolute, immoral, or disorderly Practices,” the Court, in obedience to his Majesty’s commands, ordered that all constables and other officers should do their utmost to enforce all the laws for the supression of vice and immorality.

 

p. 105.  Order dismissing the appeal of Ellesborow against a warrant removing Joseph Saunders, labourer, and his family from Brill.  He had been a servant at the former parish with John Thurbarne, esquire.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Uxbridge, co. Middlesex, against a warrant removing Richard Harrison and his children from Denham.

 

p. 106.  Thomas Stapers, who was convicted of larceny, was ordered to be whipped at the cart’s tail by the gaoler, from the Market Place at Great Marlow to the sign post of the “Three Tun inn,” and back again.  [See p. 85].

 

Charles Dormer, esquire, and Charles, Earl of Carnarvan, 

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the “Lords of divers Mannors that extend into” Hugenden, appealed against being assessed to the poor rates on certain quit rents due to them on “severall customary and freehold lands holden of [their] said Mannors . . . notwithstanding the occupiers of the lands are onely by Law chargeable to the said Rates.”  The Court allowed the appeals on the ground that “Quit rents are not rateable within the Statute.”

 

p. 107.  Order allowing the appeal of Frinkford, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Elizabeth, wife of John Nicholls, and her three children from Shenley.

 

The overseers of Princes Risborow complained that William Holt, “upon false and ill grounded suggestions,” had obtained a justice's order for the payment to him of 2s. 6d. a week, in spite of the fact that, when he came into the parish, Ephraim Holt and [Blank] Claydon entered into an indemnity on his behalf to secure the parish against his becoming chargeable, and the fact that he owns an estate in Longwick.  The matter was referred to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern.

 

p. 108.  Further adjournment of the appeal of the Rev. John Davis, rector of Sanderton, against his assessment to rates.

 

p. 109.  Upon the application of John Hatchman, overseer of Brill, it was ordered that the following children, whose parents were not able to support them, should be apprenticed “to persons fit to receive and instruct them in husbandry and huswifrey:” Thomas, son of Thomas Parsons, John, Joan, and Elizabeth, children of John Dorsall, George, William, and Ann, children of George Smith, Elizabeth and Richard, children of [Blank] Ussell, widow, John and Ann, children of Rebecca Turner, widow, Robert, son of [Blank] Mortimer, John, son of Thomas Mattingly, Richard Steward, alias Samwayes, Richard, son of [Blank] Burnham, widow, Mary, William, and John, children of Thomas Haynes, Richard and Sybil, children of Richard Parker, Ralph, Elizabeth, and George, children of [Blank] Winslow, widow, William and 

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John, sons of William Cubbidge, and Ann, daughter of John Robins.

 

p. 110.  The indictment of Thomas Stevens by the grand jury, for digging up part of a common, was quashed on the ground that it was “not an Offence within their Inquiry.” [See p. 86].

 

Orders estreating the recognizances of William Pix and Henry Lloyd, and extending those of John Marsh, John Baldwin, Jonathan Davis, and Christopher Andrews.

 

Richard Roberts of Swanbourne, labourer, to be paid £2. 10s. for money spent by him on the maintenance and on the funeral of Rose Roberts, who was in receipt of an allowance out of the County funds.

 

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £2. 2s. 8d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for sixteen weeks.

 

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid 17s. for money spent by him on the illness and the funeral of William Dormer, a prisoner who died in the gaol.

 

p. 111.  John Botley, John Clarke, William Carson, and John Cooper, poor debtors in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for their maintenance.

 

Thomas Adkins of Chepping Wycomb, butcher, who served as a soldier under Charles I, to be given 10s. out of the County funds.

 

Order increasing the County pension of Mr. Andrew Miller of Chepping Wycomb from £2 to £4 a year.

 

William Church of Wooburn given £5 out of the County funds for the relief of himself, his wife, and his seven small children, after suffering “a dreadful fire” which completely destroyed his house and mills.

 

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p. 112.  Order that £30 from the County funds should be distributed amongst the following persons, whose houses were burnt down in a fire at Prince Risborough: Thomas Bowler junior, Francis Bowler, William Bowler, Robert Stratton, William Beddall junior, Thomas Beddall, and John Beddall.

 

Order that in future the petty constables should be bound over to prosecute such indictments as were grounded upon their presentments, in the event of the accused pleading not guilty.

 

Indictments confessed and traversed.

The conviction of Thomas Stapers [see p. 85], and the acquittals of John Mitchell and John Havergill [see p. 57].

 

p. 113. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: James Beddall (p. 45) and John Snoxall (p. 78).

John Marsh of Swanborne in £10 and Edward Hobcroft of the same in £5, for the appearance of the said Marsh, and Lydia, his wife, to answer Jonas Smith.

Jonathan Davis of Maydenhead, co. Berks, labourer, in £200, with George Russell of the same, gentleman, and James Hasell of Beconsfield, tailor, as sureties in £100 each, for his good behaviour.

John Baldwin of Middle Cleydon, labourer, and William Baldwin of Padbury, yeoman, in £40 each, for bastardy.

Christopher Andrews of Taplow, bargeman, in £100, to prosecute John Tyler.

 

Recognizances entered into.

Edward Fryer of Little Missenden, yeoman, and William Veery of Cuddington, gentleman, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

Peter May of Chepping Wycomb, grocer, and Ananias Wright of Hugenden, maltster, in £20 each, for the appearance of William King of Ellesborough, yeoman, in the King’s Bench.

 

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p. 114. Fines and issues.

William Pix of Newport Pagnell, wheelwright, and Henry Lloyd of Dorney, gentleman, forfeited their recog- nizances of £40 each for non-appearance, and the two sureties of the latter, Thomas Goodchild and Bartholomew Langley, both of Dorney, yeomen, forfeited £20 each.

John Johnson of Newport Pagnell, husbandman, one of the bailiffs for the hundred of Newport, fined £1 for leaving the Court without permission.  [Fine remitted at the Michaelmas session;  see p. 150.]

 

p. 115.  The same rates fixed for Servants’ wages as at the last Easter session.  [See Vol. 4, p. 368].

 

p. 116.  Certain justices at a hearing, held in accordance with the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 6, entitled “An Act for the more easy Recovery of small tyths,” allowed the appeal of the Rev. Roger Hitchcock, vicar of Aston Abbotts, who claimed the sum of £1. 19s. from Robert Greene in respect of certain small tithes.

 

p. 117. Recognizances discharged.

Henry Tudor, cordwainer, and Thomas Simpskin, servant to Thomas Hillesden, yeoman, all of Padbury, Henry Mowday and Joseph Johnson, both of Eton, farmers, William Noake of Burnham, Edward Richardson of Wooton Underwood, farmer, John Coles of Stewkley, husbandman, William Chantrell of Drayton Parslow, carpenter, John Good- child of Princes Risborow, yeoman, John Havergill of Fawley, husbandman, John Mitchell of Ipston in Turfield, barber, William Veery of Cuddington, gentleman, Joseph Thorpe, grazier, and Thomas Thorpe, farmer, both of Hogstone, Thomas Radwell of Slapton, farmer, William Adams of Burcott in Wing, gentleman, John Costin of Slapton, carpen- ter, Joseph Chandler of Northall, shepherd, James Whiteing, husbandman, and Francis Whiteing and William Field, labourers, all of Chepping Wycomb, John Hevell, carpenter, and Richard Mitton, currier, both of Eton, Richard Lad- brooke of Upton, mealman, John Tyler and Henry Carpenter, both of Cookham, co. Berks, labourers, Jonathan Davis 

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of Maydenhead, co. Berks, labourer, Edward Fryer of Little Missenden and Francis Fryer of Hugenden, yeomen, James Crabott of Chepping Wycomb, barber-surgeon, Henry Wigg and Thomas Wigg, both of Cublington, tailors, Charles Curle of Stewkley, tailor, Ralph Bull, Robert Willison, William Shockley, Robert Cutler, and John Hitchcock, all of Drayton Parslow, yeomen, Grace Burnard, widow, Roland Burnard and Paul Burnard, butchers, and Mary Burrowes, spinster, all of Cuddington, and John Stevens of Great Marlow.

 

p. 118.  [Blank].

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT CHESHAM

14th July, 1698 [10 William III]

 

p. 119. Jurors for the body of the county.

William Collett, gentleman, Thomas Ray, Richard Greenwood, William Baker, William Burt, Richard Shrimpton, William Rawlins, John Chapman, Henry Tharpe, George Stone, Richard Culverhouse, George Williatt, Christopher Theed, John Theed, Edward Honnor, Joseph Cock, and Jonathan Butterfield.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against William Veere and Edward Fryer.

Edward Martin, Robert Kippen, Thomas Bull, Joshua Geary, Thomas Shilburne, William Hawthorne, Joseph Hobbs, Samuel Jones, and Thomas Gate, for both cases; William Wheeler, Richard White, and Thomas Lane, for the first case only, and John Cooke, William Chase, and John Wilkinson, for the second case only.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 120.  The following persons produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association”: Samuel Lee of Upper Winchinden, bread- maker to the King, John Sturk of Handslop, gentleman, and John Reeves of Newport Pagnell, apothecary.

 

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Indictments.

William Warden, labourer, constable of Little Kymbell, for not handing over the King's Bench and Marshalsea money to Edward Lamborn, the chief constable.

Ann Todd, widow, and James Brandon, labourer, both of Aylesbury, for keeping unlicensed and disorderly alehouses.

 

p. 121. Informations.

John Lucas of Nash, William Field of Aston Clinton, Robert Fincher of Wing, Joseph Cotching of Surcott, [Blank] Clarke, Richard Steele, Peter May, and Nathaniel Morgan, all of Chepping Wycomb, George Binfield of Thurney, and [Blank] Ladbrooke of Upton, all labourers, John Smith of North Marston, carrier, and Richard Woodall, alias Killingsworth, of Iver, shoemaker, for trading as badgers without being licensed.

 

p. 122. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longdeviel, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, Dorothy Waters, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Elnathan Payne, John Oakley, Michall Anthoney, [Blank] Mosdell, Thomas Crompton, Mary Brinckhurst, and John Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

William Haill and John Densey, both of Leckhamsted, for trading as grocers without due apprenticeship.

Robert Tovey of Radnage “for putting distempered and deseased horses upon their Common so that the other Commoners cannot have the benefitt thereof without danger.”

Nicholas Rose of Great Marlow “for lodging and harboring Scotch Travellers.”

Eleanor Cock of Great Marlow, widow, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

 

Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Beirton . . . . Richard Stratfold, weaver, vice Richard Johnson.

 

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Bledlow . . . . Henry Stevens vice Ralph Stone, and Edward Franklin as tithingman vice Richard Darvall.

Newport hundred—

Stoney Stratford John Spencer vice Peter Harris.

West Side

Burnham hundred—

Burnham . . . . William Turner vice Simon Negos, and Edward Bushnail as tithingman vice Thomas Tayler.

Farnham Royall Francis Prat as tithingman vice John Norman.

Stoke hundred—

Datchet . . . . Edward Carter and George Stearne as tithingmen vice [Blank]

Chalvey in Upton George Sparkes vice Thomas Talbott.

 

Orders.

p. 123.  John Snoxall withdrew his plea of not guilty to the indictment against him.  [See p. 23.]

 

Thomas Newman of Simpson excused by the Court for his non-attendance on a jury.

 

Further adjournment of the rating appeal of the Rev. John Davis.

 

p. 124.  The adjourned case of the assessments to rates at  Eton was settled, by consent of all parties, in accordance with the particulars found in “an ancient Leiger-book,” as follows: “all Lands of what kind or nature soever at 4d. in the pound rent, and the Townsmen for their houses respectively at 3d. in the pound rent and so proportionably.  And all Gentlemen or women that now are or at any time hereafter shall live or reside within the said Towne and Parish haveing estates of their own to live upon shall be respectively rated and assessed to the poor proportionably to their respective equipages or degrees, provided nevertheless that when it shall happen that any such Townsmans Stock shall be of greater value than his house, that in such Case such respective person 

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shall be rated for his respective Stock onely and then every hundred pounds in Stock shall be assessed as £5 a year in land and so proportionably.”

 

p. 125.  William Jackson “discharged of any contempt” of the order removing him from Little Woolston to Great Woolston, upon producing the lease of a house in the former parish from George Dudley to himself.  [See p. 96.]

 

Order extending the recognizance of Lawd Winkles.

 

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of William Guy, Jane, his wife, and their child from Ivingho to Eason, co. Northampton.

 

Order for the payment of the salaries of Matthew Annesley, John Rose, and Henry Munday, the bridewell- keepers

 

p. 126.  Order referring to certain justices the dispute between Fenny Stratford and Bow Brickhill concerning the conveyance of “cripples.”  [See pp. 103 and 264.]

 

Complaint by the inhabitants of Stewkley that the constables of Wing, “under pretence of pursueing an order of last sessions for putting the Lawes in Execution against Sturdy Rogues, vagrants, and beggars, did presume . . . to certify under their hands and seales that two Children, the one of the age of four and the other of two years, had been openly whipped at their parish of Wing aforesaid as wandring Beggars or vagrants, and were assigned to pass from parish to parish the straight way to Stewkley aforesaid, which papers carrying the Colour of authority had this Effect that the said two Children were conveyed through the hands of the respective Constables of the severall parishes . . . unto Stewkley aforesaid, where they are likely to become charge- able (If this practice prevail) there being no legall way to Remove them to any other place . . . which arrogant doeings of the said Constables of Wing deserve very publique discountenance.”

 

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The Court ordered that in future no constable should “presume to offend in the like nature nor under any pretence to Correct or whip as vagrants any Children under the age of seaven years.”  The settlement of the particular case in dispute was adjourned until the parents of the children could be found.

 

p. 127.  Order dismissing the appeal of Hempsted, co. Hertford, against a warrant removing William Steward, with his wife and child, from Ivingho.  Steward had been a servant to John Dell of Hempsted.

 

p. 128.  The point of law in the case of the settlement of Daniel Lucas, which was to have been referred to Sir John Holt, the Lord Chief Justice, was, by consent of the parties, referred to one of the Judges of Assize, namely, Sir Edward Ward, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. [See pp. 97, 152 and 233.]

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Aylesbury against a warrant removing Elizabeth Mushett, alias Thrustin, and her child, from East Cleydon.  It appeared during the hearing of the case that she was now married “to a Souldier now of the Quality of an Ensign in his Majesties Troops who is a native of Scotland, and there now in service at the Citty of Glasgow, whither she desires to go and has incouragement from her husband to come to Carlisle and be received in order to her further proceeding in her journey, but sayes shee is in great poverty and has ingaged those goods she had for raysing money and cannot have them out of pawne without some means might be found to advance money to redeem them.”  The Court ordered the two parishes to advance her £1 each for her journey, seeing “that it is the interest of both that shee be forwarded,” and arranged for one of the justices to give her “a sufficient passport or certificate to enable her with her Child to pass from Aylesbury . . . unto the Citty of Carlisle.”  [And see pp. I39 and 149.]

 

p. 129.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 6s. 8d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for ten weeks, and £2 for clothing her for a year.

 

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Order increasing the County pension of Mr. John Rowell of Chepping Wycomb to £6 a year.

 

Damaris Bright, who was recently apprenticed to John Southwell by order of court, allowed £2 for clothes.  But she was ordered not to make any more applications of this nature, as Southwell was bound by his covenants to supply her with such necessaries.  [See pp. 30 and 215.]

 

p. 130.  John Underwood, Robert Betteridge, Edward Grove, and John Hill, poor debtors in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for their maintenance.

 

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £11 7s. 8d. for expenses incurred in connection with the death of ten prisoners from the “contagious distemper.”

 

p. 131. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of John Snoxall [see p. 23] and William Veerey [see p. 85], and the acquittal of Edward Fryer [see p. 85].

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: James Beddall (p. 45), John Marsh, John Baldwin, and Christopher Andrewes (p. 113).

Lawd Wincles of Great Marlow and Thomas Wincles of the same, gentleman, in £20 each, to keep the peace towards Elizabeth, wife of John Brookes.

 

p. 132. Recognizance entered into.

William Veery of Cuddington, gentleman, in £40 to appear and answer Mary, wife of Thomas Turner.

 

Fines and issues.

Edmund Norman of Wavingdon fined £1. 10s. for non- attendance on a jury.  [Discharged at the Michaelmas Session;  see p. 154.]

The fines of John Snoxall [see p. 23] and Edward Fryer [see p. 85].

 

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Recognizances discharged.

John Snoxall of Soulbury, labourer, Jonathan Davis, labourer, and George Russell, gentleman, both of Maydenhead, co. Berks, James Hasell of Beconsfield, tailor, Andrew Cleaver and Joseph Cleaver, both of Weedon, gentlemen, Robert Harber, farmer, John Cordwell, and William Finch, all of Dorney, George Sparkes, farmer, John Bavin, and Thomas Morris, all of Upton, Thomas Woodward, cordwainer, Thomas Woodward senior, gentleman, and Richard Sutton, pipe-maker, all of Eton, Richard Elliott of Hartwell, servant, and Thomas Elliott of Frinckford, co. Oxford, his father, Thomas Finch of Chittwood, John Batcheller, Joseph Tench, and John Webb, all of Amersham, Robert Axtin, Thomas Wilkinson, and Samuel Bunce, all of Little Missenden, labourers, and John Scriven and William Panter, both of Hanslop, farmers.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. I33-I34.  [Blank.]

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

6th October, 1698 [10 William III]

p. 135. Jurors for the body of the county.

George Honnor, Robert Barnabee, Thomas Moreton, John Baker, William Olliver, John Hughes, Robert Taylor, Adiel Hawes, John Meade, Thomas Holland, William Wood, Robert Pitt, John Garrett, Joseph Etheridge, and Richard Parratt.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the cases against Mary Burrowes and William Hopkins.

James Hunt, John Bigg, Edward Hitchcock, William Dossett, Thomas Walter, Edward Stone, Robert Turner, 

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Thomas Spencer, William Baldwin, Joseph Dossett, William Saunders, and Ralph Stone.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

pp. 136-137.  The following persons produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association”: Thomas Barnes, mayor, and Ferdinand Shrimpton and George Cleaver, aldermen, all of Chepping Wycomb.  Samuel Clerke of Beconsfield, gentleman, took the oaths as a Dissenter.

 

p. 138.  The house of Mr. William Woods at Beconsfield was registered as a meeting house.

 

p. 139. Indictments.

Tobias Gutteridge of Agmondisham, yeoman, for assault- ing Henry Norwood.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

Richard Dormer of Hambledon, wheelwright, for assaulting Richard Burrowes.  [Fined 3s. 4d]

Nicholas Rose of Great Marlow for harbouring vagrants.

Robert Tovey of Radnage, husbandman, for putting infected and diseased cattle on the common.

John Densey and William Haill, both of Leckhamsted, labourers, for trading as grocers without due apprenticeship.

Jonathan Lander of Slowe in Upton, victualler, for disturbing the peace of the parish, and for keeping a dis- orderly alehouse.  [And see under Presentments on p. 141; and see p. 171.]

John Ball of Langley, husbandman, for digging a ditch on the road to Colebrook.  [Not guilty.]

William Hopkins and Charles Hopkins, both of Aylesbury, labourers, for stealing goods to the value of 10d. from John Fryer.  [To be whipped ; see p. 153.]

Richard Turpyn of Ivinghoe, labourer, for assaulting William Harris.  [Fined 3s. 4d.].

William Tylear of Horton, bricklayer, for not repairing part of a footpath leading to Colebrook.

John Kelly, churchwarden, and Thomas Milward, overseer, of East Cleydon, for refusing to pay £1 to Elizabeth 

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Mushett, alias Thruston, according to an order of Court. [See pp. 128, 149, and 209.]

Thomas Milward of Bottle Cleydon, yeoman, for building a cottage without assigning four acres of land.

John Rivers, innholder, Mary, his wife, and Rosamund Clarke, spinster, all of Great Marlow, for assaulting Ann Ward.  [The first two fined 13s. 4d. each; the last fined 6s. 8d.].

 

p. 140. Informations.

Richard Frane of Aylesbury, William Udden of Winslow, Richard Wittmill of Ludgarshall, George Harris of Brill, Richard Keen of Edgecott, Isaac Newman of Marsh Gibbon, and Thomas Newman of Simpson, yeomen, for trading as badgers, kidders, and drovers without being licensed, and for dealing in the following goods at Aylesbury: 100 bushels of wheat, value £30, 100 bushels of barley, value £17 10s., 100 bushels of oats, value £12 10s., 1,000 pounds of butter, value £25,2,000 pounds of cheese, value £25,2,000 fish, value £16. 13s. 4d., a quantity of other “dead victuals,” value £10, and 100 each of heifers, oxen, cows, calves, sheep, lambs, boars, and pigs.

 

p. 141. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John House, Martha [Ann] House, Sir Edward Longdeviel, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Elnathan Paine, John Oakley, Michael Anthony, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71].

[Blank] Sumner, widow, and Henry Sumner, both of Loughton, for “ stopping and turning the Church way.”

William Haill and John Densey, both of Leckhamsted, for trading as grocers and oil-merchants without due apprenticeship.

Jonathan Lander of Upton, and [Blank], his wife, for disturbing the peace of the parish, and “for upholding of his maid servants to be whores and bringing charge upon the parish with their bastard children.”  [Removed by certiorari].

Elisha Harwood of Horton for destroying game.

 

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William Hawding, alias Harding, of Little Marlow, for “plowing up a meare Baulk in the Common field called Well field,” between the land of John Payne and Arthur Warren, esquire.

 

p. 142. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Weston Turvile . . Thomas Tuffin and Thomas Young vice Nicholas Grace and Thomas Dover.

Wendover . . . . William Crismas and Henry Hore vice John Ginger and Thomas Lane.

Aston Clinton . . Nathaniel Nash and Thomas King- ham vice William Goldar senior and Mark Fenner.

Newport hundred—

Bradwell Abby . . John Cleaver vice John Homes, deceased.

Cottesloe hundred—

Drayton Beauchamp Joseph Martin vice James Morton.

Whaddon . . . . Richard Lyne senior vice Geoffrey Hamond.

Burnham hundred—

Chalfont St. Giles . . Thomas Ewer senior and William Bodington senior vice Ralph Cook and Benjamin Peed.

Chesham Bois . . John Parratt vice William Nash.

Desburrow hundred—

Wycomb Forrens . . James Wyer vice John Wheeler.

Fingest . . . . William Dean vice William Keen.

Wooburne . . . . Thomas Deane and Thomas King vice Daniel Pontifex and Francis Pepper, and John Ive and Jonathan Shrimpton junior vice Thomas Farmer and John Burcott.

 

Orders.

p. 143.  Order discharging the recognizance of John Baldwin.

 

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The overseers of Turvile complained that Mary Science, spinster, refused to enter the service they had found for her at Wallingford, co. Berks.  “And she being present in Court offered nothing materiall in her Excuse, onely expressed an unwillingness to labour, which may be of ill Example to lazy and thriftless people.”  It was, therefore, ordered that she should be sent to Wallingford by the overseers, and, if she refused, be committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb.

 

Order estreating the recognizance of Aaron Peirce of Chepping Wycomb, labourer, on account of his not appearing to prosecute Silvester Lawes for assaulting him.

 

p. 144.  Nicholas Arys, who was indicted for refusing to pay over money collected by him, when constable of Water Stratford, had since left the County.  It was, therefore, ordered that the clerk of the peace shall endeavour to discover his whereabouts, in order that he might be bound over to appear. [See p. 85].

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Robert Jane of Ivinghoe against the placing of an apprentice with him in accordance with the act of 8 and 9 William III, c. 30.

 

p. 145.  Further reference of the dispute between Bow Brickhill and Fenny Stratford.

 

p. 146.  Final order in the adjourned appeal of the Rev. John Davies, rector of Saunderton, against his assessment to rates, after hearing the report of certain justices.  The whole matter had been very full inquired into, and evidence of the last fifty years, including the time when Mr. Finch had been rector, had been produced.  The Court decided that the rector should be assessed at £100 per annum for “the Rectory, tythes, and Gleab land,” and his appeal was, therefore, dismissed.

 

p. 147.  Further adjournment of the hearing of the com- plaint of Stewkley against the constables of Wing.

 

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p. 148.  The inhabitants of Great Brickhill complained that the constables of Newton Longvill, “under pretence of pursueing an order of Easter Sessions last for the putting the Lawes in Execution against Sturdy Rogues,” etc., arrested James Keirk and Deborah, his wife, as vagrants, whipped them, and caused them to be passed, by a certificate signed by themselves as constables, to Great Brickhill, in spite of the fact that Keirk and his wife were not settled inhabitants there.  The Court ordered that Newton Longvill should, at their own expense, obtain a warrant for the removal of Keirk and his wife to Great Brickhill, against which the latter parish were given leave to appeal at the next session. [See p. 174.]

 

Jonas Harding, late overseer of Amersham, ordered to hand over to the present overseers “a parish book wherein Entryes are made of the Poore rates”, which he has “secreted and withheld” to the “manifest wrong to the inhabitants.”

 

p. 149.  Order that East Claydon should repay Aylesbury the £1 which the latter parish paid to Elizabeth Mushett, alias Thrustin, on account of the former parish refusing to obey an order of court to that effect made at the last session.  It was further decided that Elizabeth Mushett was a settled inhabitant of Aylesbury, unless she “be otherwise settled by her marriage,” but the question of the settlement of her child was adjourned.  [See pp. 128, l69 and 300.]

 

p. 150.  Order allowing the appeal of Great Horwood against a warrant removing Richard Fuller from Little Horwood.

 

The fine imposed upon John Johnson, bailiff of the hundred of Newport, was remitted upon “his solemn promise in Court not to neglect his Attendance on the Court for the future.”  [See p. 114].

 

p. 151.  Adjournment of the appeal of Haddenham against a warrant removing Richard Speed and Jane, his wife, from Bledlow.

 

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Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Thomas Loaton from Upton to Langley Marish.

 

p. 152.  As Sir Edward Ward did not give any opinion in the case of the settlement of Daniel Lucas, which was submitted to him at the Assizes, the point was again referred to the Lord Chief Justice.  [See pp. 97, 128 and 233.]

 

Thomas George to be allowed 2s. a week by the overseers of Thornton.

 

p. 153.  Order that the constables should restore to John Fryer the goods which William Hopkins and Charles Hopkins stole from him, and were found on the prisoners when they were arrested.

It was also ordered that William and Charles Hopkins should be whipped at the cart's tail from the gaol door at Aylesbury to the George Inn, round the signpost of the inn, and back again.  [See p. I39.]

 

Order allowing the appeal of Padbury against a warrant removing Henry Church, Ann, his wife, and Joan and Mary, his children, from Maids Moreton, except in regard to the child, Joan, who was declared to be a settled inhabitant of Padbury.

 

p. 154.  Order remitting the fine of Edmund Norman for non-attendance on a jury.  [See p. 132.]

 

Borlase Barker, a poor debtor in the gaol, to be allowed 3d. a day for his maintenance.

 

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his salary.

 

Barbara Headly, committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb as a vagrant, to be discharged.

 

p. 155.  The clerk of the peace to be paid £15. 3s. 6d. for County work done by him.

 

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William Penn of Chepping Wycomb, tailor, admitted to a County pension of £2 a year upon producing a certificate that he had served Charles II “in the Dutch warr on Board the ship called the Souldadoes and was by a Hurt . . . disabled from following his Trade.”

 

Francis Spyer of Wooburn to be paid £2 out of the County funds on account of his poverty.

 

Alexander Olliff to be paid £1. 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks.

 

p. 156.  The County pension of David Harding of Chepping Wycomb increased from £2 to £4 a year.

 

Mr. Mead, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £20 for work done on behalf of the County.

 

Matthew Annesley and Henry Munday, the bridewell- keepers, to be paid their salaries, and John Rose to be paid £5 for maintaining poor prisoners “whose labour has not been sufficient to maintain them.”

 

p. 157. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Tobias Goodridge [Gutteridge], Richard Turpin, William and Charles Hopkins, John Rivers and Mary, his wife, and Rosamund Clark [see p. 139], and of Mary Burrowes, now the wife of Thomas Turner [see p. 85], and the discharge, “by the favour of the Court,” of Jane Veery [see p. 85].

 

p. 158. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: James Beddall (p. 45), John Marsh and Christopher Andrews (p. 113).

Edward Colton of North Marston, yeoman, in £40, with Ambrose Bayly and John Bennill, both of the same, farmers, as sureties in £20 each, to keep the peace towards Ann Stokes.

 

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Recognizances entered into.

Jonathan Lander of Slowe in Upton, victualler, in two recognizances of £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p. I59. Fines and issues.

William Browne of Weston Turvile, Thomas Hicks of Marsh Gibbon, and Thomas Harris of Astwood, fined £1 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

Aaron Peirce of Chepping Wycomb, labourer, forfeited his recognizance of £5 for not appearing to prosecute Silvester Lawes of Great Marlow, watchmaker, for larceny.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 157.

 

p. 160. Recognizances discharged.

Laud Wincles and Thomas Wincles, gentleman, both of Great Marlow, John Baldwin of Middle Cleydon, labourer, William Baldwin of Padbury, yeoman, Jonathan Lander, innholder, Robert Gilbert, cordwainer, and William Stockley yeoman, all of Upton, James Ketsal of St. Ann’s, Blackfryers, London, merchant tailor, William Street of New Windsor, co. Berks, bargeman, Silvester Lawes of Great Marlow, watchmaker, Henry Bayle and Thomas Levyns, both of Aylesbury, labourers, Richard Turpyn of Ivingho Aston, farmer, Jane, wife of Richard Gibbons, bargeman, John Oxlade, barber-surgeon, and Elizabeth Gibbons, spinster, all of Great Marlow, Robert Trott, Richard Pond, and Robert Webbe, all of Burnham, farmers, Francis Read, James Norwood, and Daniel Anderson, all of Agmondisham, farmers, Tobias Goodridge junior, yeoman, William Smith, furrier, and William Watkins, victualler, all of Chalfont St. Peters, Thomas Elliott, butcher, John Stevens, wharfinger, Robert Swain, rope-maker, John Martin, gardener, William Carter, husbandman, and James How, blacksmith, all of Great Marlow, Edward Dean, alias Collins, of West Wycomb, Giles Shanke, husbandman, Rosamund Clarke, spinster, John Rivers, innholder, John Harris, butcher, John Harris junior, butcher, and Mary, his wife, all of Great Marlow, John Fryer of Great Kingsale in Hitchenden, farmer, Mary 

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1698

 

Saunders of Chepping Wycomb, spinster, and Thomas Smith of Upton, butcher.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 161-162.  [Blank].

 

EPIPHANY SESSION

AT WENDOVER

12th January, 1698-99 [10 William III]

 

p. 163. Jurors for the body of the county.

William Hakewill, gentleman, Thomas Symonds, John Baker, James Smith, Michael Welles, Thomas Ray, John Collins, William Tompson, Thomas Atwood, Thomas Dudley, James Turney, Walter Bovingdon, Peter Styles, William Lovett, and John Goodman.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Robert Beck, Mary Harrison, Mary Nickholls, John Jones, Jane Lawrence, and Elizabeth Hobber.

John Ginger, Joseph East, John Grace, John Quaringdon, John Meade, John Roberts, John Turner, Ananias Barnaby, Thomas Matthews, Stephen Woodbridge, William Noake, and Henry Ball.

(signed) John Rogers, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 164.  The house of Mary Herbert, widow, at St. Mary Street in Chepping Wycomb was registered as a meeting house.

 

John Ivory of Aylesbury, plasterer, was fined 2s. for one oath, on the evidence of Thomas Matthews, and William Healey of Aylesbury, labourer, was fined 2s. for two oaths.

 

p. 165. Indictments.

Robert Beck of Aylesbury, labourer, for stealing various goods from James Style.  [To be whipped; see p. 171.]

 

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William Mountague of Radnage, husbandman, for putting diseased horses on the Common.  [Fined 3s. 4d.].

William Haill and John Densey, both of Leckhamsted, labourers, for trading as grocers and oil-merchants without due apprenticeship.  [Removed by certiorari].

Elisha Harwood of Horton, labourer, for keeping two dogs, a gun, four nets, and other “engines” for taking hares, without being qualified by owning £100 of land.

Henry Sumner, labourer, and [Blank] Sumner, widow, both of Loughton, for obstructing a footpath called the Church Way.

Mary, wife of James Harrison, labourer, and Mary Nickhols, widow, both of Wendover, for stealing twenty skeins of thread from Fabian Clements.  [The former to be whipped, see p. 172; the latter not guilty.]

John Jones, labourer, Jane, wife of William Lawrence, labourer, and Elizabeth Hobber, spinster, all of Great Marlow, for stealing a pair of leather breeches from Robert Cook.  [Not guilty, see p. 173.]

 

p. 166. Informations.

Isaac Bennett, John Clarke, Nathaniel Morgan, Daniel Shrimpton, Richard Steele, and Joseph Stalwood, all of Chepping Wycombe, Henry Pantling of Stewkley, John Conn of Newton Longuevile, and Charles Lawrence of North Crawley, all yeoman, for trading as badgers, kidders and drovers without being licensed, and dealing in various goods at Aylesbury.

 

Presentment of the justices.

William Edge of Chesham, victualler, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

 

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, Martha [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longdevield, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Maby, Ann Maby, Dorothy Waters, Frances Carter, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1698-99

 

Thomas Allen of Stone “for neglecting to carry Passengers away.”

Moses Bristow of Princes Risborow for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.

Henry Hoar, William Christmas, and Joseph Stalwood, constable of the Forrens of Wendover, for not making their returns.

William Phillips of Great Marlow for laying straw in the highway.

 

p. 167. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Owleswick . . . . Henry Alnutt as tithingman vice John Lacy.

Buckland . . . . Richard Bampton vice Thomas Horwood.

Broughton . . . . William How vice John Paige.

Wendover Forrens . . Robert Dorsett vice Joseph Stalwood

Newport hundred—

Bow Brickhill . . Edward Cooke vice Thomas Bell.

Stoke Goldington . . Thomas Hooton vice William Kilpin.

Ashenden hundred—

Brill . . . . Richard Hawes vice Anthony Davice.

Burnham hundred—

East Burnham . . Thomas Andrews vice Thomas Dod.

Boveney . . . . John Hunt vice John Appleby, and Samuel Roberts as tithingman vice Nathaniel Hunt.

Stoke hundred—

Denham . . . . Thomas Holland and Edward Chambers vice John Tompson and [Blank].

 

Orders.

p. 168.  Order for the release of William Gregory of Wotton Underwood, who was committed to the bridewell at Aylesbury for running away and leaving his family chargeable to the parish.

 

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Adjournment of the hearing of the complaint of St. Mary le Bone, co. Middlesex, that Mr. John Plaiter of Haddenham ought to support John, Sarah, and Catherine, his grand- children, whose father, Alexander Stone, resided in their parish but was unable to maintain them.  [See p. 235.]

 

Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his salary.

 

Order referring to certain justices the complaint of Mary, widow of Robert Stannanett, that the inhabitants of Taplow owed her and her late husband a considerable sum of money for conveying “cripples,” under a contract entered into by her husband several years ago.  [See p. 362.]

 

p. 169.  Thomas Milward, overseer of East Cleydon, to be bound over to appear at the next session for refusing to obey an order of Court to repay the inhabitants of Aylesbury £1, which they advanced to Elizabeth Mushett, alias Thrustin. [See p. 149.]

 

Further reference of the case of the settlement of Daniel Lucas to the Judges of Assize.  [See p. 152.]

 

p. 170.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Ann Dyet, spinster, from Winslow to Grandborough.

 

The surveyors of Aylesbury authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

p. 171.  John Cleaver to be bound over to appear at the next session for refusing to be sworn petty constable of Bradwell Abbey in place of John Holmes, deceased.  Informa- tion was given by Withers Nicholls.

 

The cases against Jonathan Lander and his wife removed into the King’s Bench by writ of certiorari.

 

Robert Beck, found guilty of larceny, to be whipped at 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1698-99

 

the cart’s tail from the gaol door at Aylesbury to the George Inn signpost and back again.  [See p. I95.]

 

p. 172.  Order dismissing as “vexatious and frivolous” the appeal of Wing against a warrant removing John and Hannah, children of William Hodges, from Stewkley.

 

Certificates given to Ferdinand Shrimpton of Penn, gentleman, Ananias Barnaby of Hugenden, lace-buyer, and Henry Goodson of Weston Turvile, lace-buyer, that they had each, in open Court, made the following oath :

“That the Bonelace which he, this Deponent, Exposeth to Sale is of the making of him and his Servants, and that he doth not Expose to sale any Bonelace or other goods or wares save what are made as aforesaid.”

 

Mary Harrison, found guilty of larceny, to be whipped at the cart's tail at Wendover from the signpost of the White Horse Inn to the signpost of the George Inn.  [See p. 165.]

 

p. 173.  Order estreating the recognizance of Robert Cook on account of his absence to give evidence when John Jones and others were tried for larceny.  [See p. 165.]

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern the complaint by the Forrens of Chepping Wycomb concerning “the irregular carriage of Cripples.”

 

p. 174.  Certain justices appointed to ascertain how much money was owing from the parish to Edward Sheppard, a late overseer of Weedon in Hardwick, who “by the providence of God became Lunatic.”  [See p. 302.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Great Brickhill against a warrant removing James Keirk and Deborah, his wife, from Newton Longuevile, but without granting costs against the appellants.  [See p. 148.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Burnham against a warrant removing Thomas Stevens from Hugenden.

 

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p. 175.  Order confirming a warrant removing Christopher Hadnot from Burnham to Hurst, co. Berks.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Winslow against a warrant removing Mary Hargate from Wingrave.

 

p. 176.  Further reference of the dispute between Bow Brickhill and Fenny Stratford.

 

John Rose and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

 

pp. 177-179.  The following weekly allowances to be paid by the respective parishes: Daniel Stokes of Halton, 2s.; John Welles and William Hawkins, both of Pitstone, 1s. each; John Daffees of Edlesborough, 2s. 6d.; Matthew Parish of Ivingho, 2s. 6d.; Margaret Hatcher and Henry Johnson, both of Wendover, 2s. each; Thomas Read of Walton, 2s.; Catherine Dale of Great Missenden, 1s. 6d.; Thomas Andrews of Bierton, 2s. 6d.; Mary, wife of William Woster of Chesham, whose husband had “fled from her,” 3s.

 

p. 180.  John Kidgell, one of the late treasurers, ordered to have his accounts audited at once by certain justices and to hand over the balance to his successor, John Scott of Maids Morton.

 

John Leper and John Tring, poor debtors in the gaol, to be “admitted to an allowance of the County bread.”

 

p. 181.  William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid the following amounts: 11s. for a coffin and “parish dutys” for Thomas Hargrave, who died in the gaol; £1. 6s. for money spent on nursing George Mackemm; £1. 7s. 8d. each for the fees of Gregory Sudlington, Elizabeth Moxon, Henry Head, and Elizabeth Holloway, who were discharged at the last Assizes. He also asked for an allowance for “his extraordinary charge to watchmen” in consequence of “very great Disorders of the Prisoners in his Custody,” and this request was referred to the determation of certain justices.

 

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1698-99

 

Mr. John Piddington of Aylesbury, apothecary, to be paid £17 15s. 2d. for medicines supplied during the last three years to prisoners in the goal, who, “especially the last Summer, have bene dangerously sick of fevours and other malignant distempers, . . . which (with God’s blessing) recovered some of them.”

 

p. 182.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

 

Mr. Meads, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £2 for “one years Exhibition money” paid to Mr. Hyde, the receiver to the Lord Chief Justice, and £20 for other County work.

 

p. 183. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Robert Beck, Mary Harrison, and Mary Nickhols [see p. 165] and of Richard Dormer [see p. 139], and the acquittals of John Jones, Jane Lawrence, and Elizabeth Hobber [see p. 165].

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: John Marsh and Christopher Andrews (p. 113), and Edward Colton (p. 158).

Richard Baguly of Lathbury, clerk, in £20, with Phillip Freeman, farmer, and Samuel Smith, butcher, both of the same, as sureties in £10 each, for his good behaviour.

William Lawrence of Great Marlow, labourer, in £5, with William White of the same, labourer, as surety in £5. for receiving and selling stolen goods.

 

p. 184. Recognizances entered into.

William Whittington of Taplow, labourer, in £40, with Henry Ball of Burnham, yeoman, and Stephen Woodbridge of Beconsfield, barber, as sureties in £20 each, to appear at the next session.

William Ravelyn of Taplow, labourer, in £20, with Robert Westcott of Boveney, cordwainer, as surety in £10, to appear at the next session.

 

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John Ball of Langley, husbandman, in £40, to appear and answer.

John Cooper of Eaton, joiner, and William Stockley of Upton, mercer, in £20 each for the appearance of Jonathan Lander of Slowe in Upton, victualler, and Sarah, his wife, in the King's Bench.

 

p. 185. Fines and issues.

John Anderson of Long Crendon fined £1. 10s. for non- attendance on a jury.

The fine of Richard Dormer.  [See p. I39.]

 

Recognizances discharged.

James Beddall, butcher, and Richard Hunt, yeoman, both of Towersey, Christopher Coates, victualler, William Hill, innholder, and John Sermon, cordwainer, all of Great Missenden, William Edge, victualler, William West, gentle- man, and Abraham Gray, clothier, all of Chesham, William Whittington of Taplow, labourer, Henry Ball of Burnham, farmer, Stephen Woodbridge of Beconsfield, barber, Robert Westcott of Boveney, cordwainer, John Brown of Taplow, farmer, John Aslett, William King, Thomas Oliver, and John Pool, all of Asford, co. Middlesex, farmers, Mary, wife of James Harrison, and Mary Nickholls, widow, both of Wendover, John Ivory, brazier, and Richard Kingham, cordwainer, both of Aylesbury, John Jennings, sawyer, Luke Bekylls, innholder, William Darvall, victualler, Humphrey Hind, labourer, and William Cawdray, cooper, all of Wendover, William Adams, labourer, William King, yeoman, William Dean, labourer, William Curtis, and William Allen and John Wade, wheelwrights, all of Edlesborough, John Inwood, William Temple, and Nathaniel Wingfield, all of Stewkley, wheelwrights, Edward Jennings, William Jennings, and George Jennings, all of Wendover, labourers, James Graveney, of Great Missenden, cheesemonger, Henry Meards, labourer, Adam Morrer, chapman, and Charles Lawrence, baker, all of Great Marlow, Daniel Seymoure of Poscome, co. Oxford, husbandman, James Stile of Burnham, yeoman, Fabian Clements, Daniel Moors of Great Kimbell, and William 

196

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EPIPHANY SESSION, 1698-99

 

Frary and George Perry, labourers, and Christopher Keble- white, bargeman, all of Great Marlow.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 186. [Blank.]

 

EASTER SESSION

AT BUCKINGHAM

20th April, 1699 [11 William III]

 

p. 187. Jurors for the body of the county.

John Mason junior, John Truelock junior, William Baldwin, Thomas King, Henry Smith, Andrew Rice, William Stevens senior, John Symons, Joseph Welles junior, Thomas Thorne, Richard Broughton, Thomas Henley, Thomas Blake, Thomas King, Thomas Emerton, Thomas Keene, and Richard White.

(signed) John Sparkes, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the cases against Sarah Smith and John Ball.

Thomas Kidgell, gentleman, Thomas Bowrey, John Jemmett, William Ladbury, Henry Jones, Thomas Playstead, Thomas Newton, Robert Greene, William Allen, Henry Ball, Ralph Pursell, and John Austin.

(signed) John Sparkes, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 188.  The following persons produced sacrament certifi- cates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association”: John Sparkes of Chepping Wycomb, esquire; Molineux Robinson of Buckingham, gentleman, who was in temporary command of the troops of Francis Sulley in the Duke of Schomberg’s Regiment of Cavalry; Abraham Carter and Thomas Hunter, bailiff, and Ferdinand Shrimpton and George Clewer, aldermen, of Chepping Wycomb.

 

The houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses: Thomas Cubbidge of Chittwood, Joseph 

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Albright of Leckhamsted, and William Ashbey of Lillingstone Dorrell.

 

p. 189. Indictments.

Francis Fullbrook of Brill, farmer, for assaulting William Ladbury.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

Sarah Smith of Aylesbury, spinster, for stealing three pairs of linen sleeves from Thomas Read.  [Not guilty.]

John Harrison of Winslow, glover, for not keeping a true account when he was ordered, as one of the bailiffs, by John Rogers, the sheriff, to arrest William Rogers and receive from him the fees due to Nicholas Merwyn, an attorney, and thus defrauding William Rogers of 10s.

John Allen, labourer, constable of Stone, for passing inhabitants of Stone to Monks Risborow.

William Edge of Chesham, victualler, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

 

p. 190. Presentment of the grand jury.

The inhabitants of Westcot in Waddesdon for not repairing part of the road from Grendon Underwood to Aylesbury.  [Discharged on certificate.]

 

Presentment of the highway surveyors.

Henry Stanbridge of Wadsdon, grazier, for not repairing part of the highway to Dinton, at a place called Broadfield.

 

p. 191. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, Martha [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longdevide, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Maby, Ann Maby, Dorothy Walters, Frances Carter, Elnathan Payne, John Oakley, Michael Anthony, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

John Tripp of Longwick in Prince Risborow, Ann, wife of Timothy Reynolds of Monks Risborow, and Thomas Ludgatt of Nash in Whaddon, husbandman, for harbouring beggars.

 

198

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EASTER SESSION, 1699

 

William Philipps of Great Marlow for putting dung and straw in the highway.

Ann Jackson of Chalvey in Upton for wilful perjury against Thomas Smith and his wife.

 

p. 192. Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . . . Robert Reynolds of West End in Dinton and Thomas Jackson of Stoke Mandivile vice Edward Stone and William Hill.

Newport . . . . Thomas Hodgskin of Stoke Goldington and John Gregory of Wavingdon vice Thomas Cooper and Thomas Cook.

Buckingham . . John Addams senior of Thornborow and Daniel Elliott of Tingwick vice Stephen Greaves and Richard Harris.

Cottesloe . . . . William Peele of Burcott in Wing and Richard Redding of Hardwick vice William Gawfield and William Illing.

Ashendon . . Thomas Hughes of Quainton and Richard Emerton of Long Crendon vice John Griffing and George Harris.

Stoke . . . . Zebulon Hawkins of Langley and William Liver of Eaton vice John Jemmett and Thomas Bowrey.

Desborough . . William Fryer of Chepping Wycomb Forrens and Matthew Medwin of Little Marlow vice John Plomer and Thomas Denham.

Burnham . . . . James Stiles of Burnham and John Bovingdon of Amersham Woodside vice Henry Ball and Henry Morton.

 

Treasurers sworn.

For the King’s  Bench and Marshalsea  Jonathan Grove of Penn, yeoman, and William Glenister junior of Pightleston, gentleman, vice William Bovingdon and Thomas Worster.

 

199

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For the maimed soldiers Henry Babham of Weston Turvile and   John, son of the late George Deverell   of Swanburne, gentlemen, vice   Thomas Goodson and Thomas Scott.

 

pp. 193-195.   Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Brannsfee . . . . Thomas Hutchinson vice Moses Biscoe.

Bierton . . . . Richard Fulks vice Richard Stratford.

Hartwell . . . . Francis Horton vice Christopher Foster.

Little Kimbell . . John Howes vice Simon Hollite.

Great Kimbell . . Richard Clarke and Thomas Ford vice William Carter and John Toppen.

Little Missenden . . Thomas Harris vice William Line.

Great Missenden . . Francis Paine and Thomas Todd vice Thomas Right and William Hill, and Paul Hern as tithingman vice Henry Darvall.

Monks Risborow . . Ambrose Fletcher of Meadle and Thomas Stevenson senior vice Joseph Dancer and Thomas Aldridge.

Hulcott . . . . Gilbert Hassell vice Thomas Atkyns.

Halton . . . . Thomas Turpyn vice Thomas Hoare.

Newport hundred—

Astwood . . . . Thomas Harris vice John Foard.

Bleachly . . . . Robert Fellow vice John Emerton.

Bradwell . . . . Henry Winmill vice John Hoare.

Cole Brayfield . . Anthony Stevenson vice Richard Beale.

Clifton Reynes . . Richard Smith vice John Pearson.

Haversham . . James Coall vice John Browton.

North Crawley . . William Bitchenoe and John Wright, grocer, vice Samuel Fensham and William Williamson.

Little Crawley in Richard Vauxe vice William Vauxe.

North Crawley

Newton Longvile . . Bennett Meltham and John Horne vice Geoffrey Hart and Alden Fuller.

Middleton . . . . William Pancraft vice Henry Lan- caster.

Simpson . . . . William Seere vice Richard Goodman. 

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 EASTER SESSION, 1699

 

Sherington . . Thomas Vinney and Anthony Liting vice Thomas Luckes and George London.

Stoney Stratford West Peter Harris senior vice [John Spencer].

Stoke Hammond . . Lawrence King and John Franklin vice Anthony Rutley and Thomas Johnson.

Eaton . . . . John Goodman vice Richard Fowler.

Wavendon . . . . Thomas Plowman vice William Whoton.

Great Woolston . . John Chad vice John Dudley.

Little Woolston . . John Nickhols vice Thomas Binyon.

Buckingham hundred—

Addington . . . . William Capp vice William Hall.

East Cleydon . . Edward Franklyn vice George Field.

Padbury . . . . Thomas Merry and John Russell vice John Barton and Thomas Tomlins.

Ashenden hundred—

Borstall . . . . Thomas Winslow vice Thomas Thorn- ton.

Kingsey . . . . George Livingston vice Thomas Harris.

North Marston . . Henry Coker and Henry Simonce vice John Bennill and Ralph Stevens.

Lower Winchendon Thomas Seare vice John Lowe.

Upper Winchendon Edward Barnard vice Francis Cripps.

Wornall . . . . Thomas Munt vice Jeremiah Winter.

Wadsdon . . . . William Wallington vice Thomas Rice.

Wadsdon Town . . Francis Southam vice Anthony Holloway.

Westcott . . . . John Hopgood vice Thomas Green.

Cottesloe hundred—

Cublington . . James Lucas vice Henry Grace.

Cheddington . . Daniel Partridge vice John Seabrooke.

Mentmore . . . . Thomas Fountain junior and Thomas Spencer vice John Green and John Jane.

Salden in Muresley Richard Collier and Thomas Illmore vice William Gurney and Richard Petteson.

 

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 QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5

 

Slapton . . . . Henry Ames vice Thomas Radwell.

Stewkley . . . . John Green vice Benjamin Tofield.

Wingrave . . . . Thomas Keene vice Richard Harley.

Whitchurch . . . . John Harris and John Billington vice William Emerton and John Hark.

Burnham hundred—

Beconsfield . . . . John Gregory and Robert Bates vice George Tomson and John Preston, and James Dearne and Henry Fellows as tithingmen vice Thomas East and Robert Moores.

Burnham . . . . Richard Curtis vice John Adkins.

Taplow . . . . Richard Croxford as tithingman vice William Ravening.

Desborow hundred—

Bradenham . . Francis Alice vice John Springall.

Hambledon . . Francis Hedington vice John Freeman.

Hitchenden . . Francis Smith vice John Theed.

Hedsor in Little Marlow   Thomas Harding of Moncken Farm vice  George Honnor.

Hugenden . . . . John Cheasley as tithingman vice Daniel Baldwin.

Medmenham . . John Austin vice John Eells.

Radnage . . . . Daniel Wingrave vice William Mountague.

Turvile . . . . Thomas Fowler vice John Ilbury, and Roger Williams as tithingman vice Thomas Fowler.

Ibstone in Turvile . . Francis Simons vice Ralph Rolls.

West Wycomb . . John Stratford and William Hodsden vice Richard Hobbs and Peter Chalfont.

Stoke hundred—

Eton, The Gildables Thomas Woodward senior vice Thomas Andrews junior.

Eaton . . . . Solomon Collings vice Richard Talbutt, and John Cope and William Heither vice Thomas Randall and John Bowding.

Hugeley . . . . William Blinks vice Thomas Craft.

 

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 EASTER SESSION, 1699

 

Horton . . . . Joseph Devonshire and Thomas Hampson vice Edward Tring and William Bullpitt, and William Russell as tithingman vice Joseph Fulmer.

Waxham . . . . Thomas Knowlton vice Thomas Streeting.

 

Orders.

p. 196.  Orders extending the recognizances of John Marsh and Lydia, his wife, Christopher Andrews, and Edward Colton.

 

John Rogers of Torcester, co. Northampton, discharged on a justices’ certificate.

 

Order referring to certain justices the appeal of Richard Dell to be repaid money spent by him when he was petty constable of Chalfont St. Peters.  [See p. 260.]

 

p. 197.  John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycomb, to be paid his salary.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Siddenham, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Thomas Anderson, labourer, and his family from Ashenden.  It was decided that he was a settled inhabitant of Emerton, co. Oxford.

 

p. 198.  Order allowing the appeal of Little Brickhill against a warrant removing William Harding from North Crawley. It was erroneously suggested that he had been apprenticed to George Gosley of Little Brickhill, shoemaker.

 

p. 199.  Order dismissing as “frivolous and vexatious” the appeal of Lukenor, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Joseph Deane, alias Collins, from West Wycomb.

 

The surveyors of Brill authorized to raise a 4d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

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 QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5

 

p. 200.  Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, to be paid his salary.

 

p. 201.  Order allowing the appeal of Aston Abbotts against a warrant removing Thomas Miller from Winslow.

 

pp. 202-203.  The same rates fixed for Servants’ wages as at the last Easter session.  [See p. 115.]

 

p. 204.  Usual order as to the rates for carriage of goods by land.  [See Vol. 4, p. 369.]

 

p. 205.  In consequence of the good effect which was brought about by the publication of the order, at the last Easter session, concerning the suppression of rogues and vagabonds, this order was renewed and was to be again distributed to all officers of the County.  [See pp. 98-101.]

 

p. 206.  Order fixing the price of salt at a flat rate of 7s. a bushel.  [See p. 176.]

 

p. 207.  Order allowing the appeal of Hockley, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing John Crosse from Edlesborough. 

p. 208.  Order declaring that a pass certified by the constables of Pitchcott for the removal of [Blank] Evans and his wife to Oveing was illegal.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of St. Mary Magdalen, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Jane King, spinster, from Penn.

 

Order that the judgment of certain justices, requiring George Lord to pay his small tithes to the Rev. William Aspin, D.D., rector of Emberton, should be filed with the records of the Court.

 

P. 209.  Order dismissing the appeal of Halton against an order to pay an allowance of 2s. a week to Daniel Stokes.

 

204

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 EASTER SESSION, 1699

 

The cases against John Kelly and Thomas Milward removed into the King’s Bench by writ of certiorari.  [See p. 139.]

 

p. 210.  Order giving leave for John Densey and William Haill, both of Leckhamsted, to submit the legal question in the cases against them to the Judges of Assize.  They were both indicted for trading as grocers and oil-merchants without due apprenticeship, and they contended that the act of 5 Elizabeth, c. 4, referred only to “trades and manual occupa- tions in Markett Townes,” and not to their own cases, as they were only small shopkeepers in “a country village.” [See pp. 139, 165, and 401.]

 

Further adjournment of the case of the settlement of Daniel Lucas.

 

p. 211.  Francis Ligo, esquire, J.P., presented a complaint to the effect “that the public pair of Stocks for a Liberty in Aylesbury . . . called the Parsons Fee now are and have been anciently placed in a certain Street in Aylesbury aforesaid leading to the parish Church there under a Mudd wall tyled that incloses the garden belonging to his Mansion house scituate in or near the same Street, and that by the help of the same Stocks persons may with great Ease Climbe over his said wall into his said garden, and not only Robb his garden but his said Mansion house, Stables, and outhouses . . . which is of very great Annoyance and unsafety to him and his family.”  The Court ordered the petty constables of the parish to move the stocks elsewhere.

 

p. 212.  Order that all the retiring treasurers should attend at the George Inn at Aylesbury on the 1st of June to have their accounts audited and to hand over their balances to their successors.

 

p. 213.  William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £10 “for keeping of a servant and watch for the guarding of his said Goal since violent attempts of the prisoners to break the same.”

 

205

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 QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5

 

John Piddington of Aylesbury, apothecary, to be paid £1. 19s. 4d. for attendance on sick prisoners in the gaol.

 

p. 214.  Matthew Lee and Ann Fellowes, widow, poor debtors in the gaol admitted “to an allowance of the County Bread with the King’s prisoners.

 

“Forasmuch as great demands have been made to this Court by the Baker who supplyes the Goal . . . with bread for the King’s Prisoners and other prisoners in the said Goal of which no certain account hath been formerly given,” it was ordered that the gaoler should, before every session, give in an account to one of the justices who lived in Aylesbury “of what bread has from the former sessions been delivered to him or his servants for the use and benefitt of the Prisoners in his Custody dureing that time and what Prisoners by name have been duely intituled to such allowance,” and that the baker should also deliver his account to the justice at the same time.

 

p. 215.  Alexander Oliffe to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

 

Mary Suddle attended the Court “with the County  Child placed Apprentice with her husband, and pressed earnestly to have an Allowance of £2 for the Cloathing the said Apprentice against the tenor of a former order now read, and which therefor this Court utterly refused.  Yet in regard She with the said Apprentice are a great distance from home and in distress for money,” the Court gave her 10s. [See p. I29].

 

p. 216.  Order passing the accounts of John Maccascree, gentleman, the treasurer of the Militia Tax, in accordance with the act of 13 and 14 Charles II, c. 3.  The balance in his hands was £39. 6s. 9d. and the accounts were certified by the following: John, Earl of Bridgwater, Lord Lieutenant, and William, Viscount Newhaven, and Richard Ingoldesby, deputy lieutenants.

 

206

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 EASTER SESSION, 1699,

 

p. 217. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Francis Fulbrook [see p. 189] and John Austin [see p. 85], and the acquittals of Sarah Smith [see p. 189] and John Ball [see p. 139].

 

Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: John Marsh and Christopher Andrewes (p. 113), Edward Colton (p. 158), and William Lawrence (p. 183).

 

p. 218. Recognizances entered into.

John Rogers junior of Handley House in Towcester, co. Northampton, labourer, in £40, with John Rogers senior of the same, yeoman, and Thomas Norman of Wood Burcott in the same parish, yeoman, as sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer in respect of the bastard child of Mary Letts.

William Allen, wheelwright, John Salter, husbandman, and Thomas Twyne, labourer, all of Ellesborow, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

 

p. 219. Fines and issues.

William Sheppard of Great Brickhill and Edward Knight of Olney fined £1. 6s. 8d. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of Francis Fulbrook [see p. 189] and John Austin [see p. 85].

 

p. 220. Recognizances discharged.

Richard Bagguley, clerk, Philip Freeman, farmer, and Samuel Smith, butcher, all of Lathbury, William Whittington of Taplowe, labourer, Henry Ball of Burnham, yeoman, Stephen Woodbridge of Beconsfield, barber, William Ravelyn of Taplow, labourer, Robert Westcott of Boveney, cord- wainer, George Scott and Edward Boswell, both of Lavenden, yeomen, Thomas Belch, miller, Edward Wetherley, yeoman, William Smith, mealman, and Flamock Hodgkin, yeoman, all of Chalfont St. Peters, Francis Fulbrook, farmer, and John Gregory and George Harris, yeomen, all of Brill, Thomas Twyne, gardener, John Salter, yeoman, and Thomas

 

207

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 QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK, VOLUME 5

 

Fellowes, labourer, all of Ellesborowe, Benjamin Markham of Ivingho Aston, farmer, William Reding, William Wyatt, Thomas Tayler, and Hugh Burrall, all of Winslowe, butchers, Sarah Smith, spinster, Thomas Kempster, victualler, and Robert Cox, mealman, all of Aylesbury, Richard Blackwell of [Blank], Richard Dell of Chalfont St. Giles, farmer, and Thomas Millward of East Cleydon, yeoman.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

pp. 221-222.  [Blank.]

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT CHESHAM

13th July, 1699 [11 William III]

 

p. 223.   Jurors for the body of the county.

Edward Butterfield, William Baldwin, Edward Martin, John Ewstace, Thomas Rose junior, Samuel Blicke, Francis Goodchild, Richard Herne, Thomas Cox, Richard Hewett, Thomas Newman, Robert Richardson, William Paine, John Attwell, and Richard Brinklow.

(signed) John Sparkes, esquire, sheriff.

 

p.  224.  The following produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association:” Sir Richard Temple, Bt., of Stowe, Sir John Wittewrong, Bt., of Stanton Berry, Hugh Horton, esquire, receiver-general, and John Rogers of Buckingham, esquire.

 

The houses of James King of Moulso and William Markes of North Crawley were registered as meeting houses.

 

William Robinson of Quainton, farmer, was fined 2s. for swearing one oath.

 

p. 225. Indictments.

Elizabeth Allen of Waddesden, widow, for harbouring vagabonds.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

 

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Richard Jennings of Wendover, turner, for keeping two greyhounds, one hand-gun, and two nets, and for killing three hares, three rabbits, three pheasants, and three part- ridges without being qualified.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

Jonathan Lander of Upton, labourer, and Sarah, his wife, for keeping a disorderly alehouse and for harbouring harlots.  [Not guilty.]

Thomas Milward of East Cleydon, yeoman, for building a cottage without assigning four acres of land.  [Not guilty.]

Richard Allen of Waddesden, labourer, for entertaining inmates and their families.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

William Mayne of Waddesden, labourer, for entertaining Mary Willmott, spinster, as an inmate.

John Tripp of Longwick in Princes Risborough and Thomas Ludgate of Nash in Whaddon, labourers, for harbouring vagabonds.

Henry Stanbridge of Waddesden, grazier, for not repairing part of the highway to Dynton at a place called Broadfield.  [Discharged on certificate.]

William Phillipps of Great Marlow, yeoman, for putting ten cartloads of straw and dung on the highway to Henley, co. Oxford.

Hester Jane of Ivinghoe, labourer, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

Richard Dorsett of Ellesborough, labourer, for keeping two greyhounds, one hand-gun, and two nets, and for killing three hares, three rabbits, three pheasants, and three partridges, without being qualified.

 

p. 226. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, Ann Howse, Sir Edward Longvill, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Maby, Agnes [Ann] Maby, Dorothy Waters, Frances Carter, Thomas Crumpton, Mary Brinkhurst, Michael Anthony, and John Oakley, for recusancy [See note on page 71.]  The following constables brought in these presentments: Thomas Ilmore and Richard Collier, constables of Salden in Mursley;  Richard Corbet and John Langley, constables of the Forrens of Great 

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Marlow;  Solomon Collings and Thomas Woodward, constables of Eaton.

Thomas Hoare of Halton for refusing to watch, and putting Thomas Turpin, the constable, to the trouble of hiring a man in his place.

Robert Durrent of Little Hampden for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.  Presented by Joseph Cutler, constable.

Elizabeth Nash of Amersham, spinster, for having a bastard child.  Presented by Edward Leered and Joseph Tench, constables.

 

p. 227. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Aylesbury, Lords Fee  William Webb vice Robert Cox.

Aylesbury, Parsons Fee   John Humfrey and ThomasLee vice  Richard Kingham and Henry   Hawkins.

Walton . . . . Thomas Sheene and Richard Wotton vice Thomas Clarke and Robert Humphrey.

Great Kymbell . . Robert Perry as tithingman vice Thomas Tayler.

Bledlowe . . . . Robert Dossett and William Butler vice Henry Stevens and Edward Francklyn, and Thomas Tripp as tithingman vice Richard Walker.

Ashenden hundred—

Ludgarshall . . . . William Burborow vice John Bartholomew.

Burnham hundred—

Burnham Town . . John Goldwyn vice William Turner, and John Wiggins as tithingman vice Edward Bushnaile.

Taplow . . . . Thomas Nevill vice William Whittington.

Desburrow hundred—

Hambleden . . . . Robert Rockall and John Rockall vice Abraham Gray and John Freeman, and Richard Barlow as tithingman vice John Edwards.

 

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 The Court ordered that in future no constable should “presume to offend in the like nature nor under any pretence to Correct or whip as vagrants any Children under the age of seaven years.”  The settlement of the particular case in dispute was adjourned until the parents of the children could be found.

 MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1699

 

Stoke hundred—

Eton . . . . . . Thomas Bidle as tithingman vice William Heither.

Chalvey in Upton . . Nicholas Frewin as tithingman vice George Sparkes.

Orders.

p. 228.  Order extending the recognizance of John Rogers junior of Handley House in Tocester, co. Northampton, owing to his inability to attend the Court “by a blowe he received lately from his horse.”

 

Further reference of the dispute between Richard Dell and the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Peter.

 

Order discharging the recognizance of Robert Cook of New Windsor, co. Berks, to prosecute John Jones, Jane, wife of William Lawrence, and Elizabeth, wife of William Hebberd.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Iver against a warrant removing John Fell, with his wife and children, from Langley Marish.

 

p. 229.  The surveyors of Colebrook authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

Order confirming a justices’ warrant for the arrest of Richard Harrison for running away from his family and leaving them chargeable to the parish of [Blank].  Harrison alleged that “he was much in debt and absconded from his Creditors, being in fear of an Arrest, and therefore was not within the Intent of the Statutes.”

 

p. 230.  Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Cottesloe and Aylesbury the rating appeal of Mr. Edward Gyles of Wingrave.

 

Mary Pratt, widow, the baker of “the County Bread,” to be paid £21. 0s. 3d. in accordance with her account, 

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which was duly presented to Hugh Horton, esquire, one of the justices, in pursuance of an order made at the last session. [See p. 214].

 

p. 231.  William Sheppard of Great Brickhill appealed against his fine of four nobles [£1. 6s. 8d.] for non-attendance on a jury, contending that the sheriff had summoned the wrong man.  The Court dismissed the appeal.  [See p. 219.]

 

Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Aylesbury and Ashenden the rating appeal of Mr. Robert Thorpe of Aylesbury.

 

p. 232.  Order referring to the justices for the hundreds of Burnham and Desborough the appeal of Anthony Radcliffe, esquire, against his assessment to rates at Chalfont St. Peters and Chalfont St. Giles.

 

p. 233.  In the case of the appeal of Wingrave against the warrant removing Daniel, son of John Lucas, from Aylesbury, an opinion was eventually obtained from Sir Henry Hatsel, Baron of the Exchequer, that Daniel Lucas ought to be settled at Aylesbury.  But the inhabitants of Aylesbury obtained a writ of certiorari removing the case into the King’s Bench.  [See pp. 97, 128, and 152.]

 

p. 234.  William Wilson appointed overseer of Ivingho Aston in place of Thomas Johnson, who had left the parish.

 

John Welles and William Hawkins to be allowed 1s. a week each by the overseers of Pightleston.

 

Elizabeth Judge to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Little Missenden.

 

p. 235.  Order dismissing the appeal of Tocester, co. Northampton, against a warrant removing Elizabeth, wife of Edward Bosworth, from Little Brickhill.

 

Order dismissing as “frivolous and vexatious” the 

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demand of St. Mary le Bone, co. Middlesex, that John Playter of Haddenham should support his three grandchildren who lived in the former parish.  [See p. 168.]

 

The surveyors of Beconsfield asked the Court for a ruling on section 5 of the act of 7 and 8 William III, c. 29, as to the position when an inhabitant was assessed at more than one plough-land, but owned only one team, and as to how the value of £50 per annum, which was taken in this section to be the equivalent value of one plough-land, should be assessed.  The Court ruled that each inhabitant was liable to find one team, or its equivalent cost, for each plough-land owned by him, and that “the computation of the values of such lands are to follow the usuall rates to the poore.”

 

p. 236.  The surveyors of Ellesborough, Beconsfield, Weston Turvile, and Aylesbury authorized to raise rates of 6d. each for the repair of their highways.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Wooburne, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Sarah Neate, spinster, from Braddenham.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of St. Mary Magdalen, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Jane King from Penn.

 

p. 237.  Adjournment of the appeal of Denshanger, co. Northampton, against a warrant for the settlement of Edward [Blank] there.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Stoke Hamond against a warrant removing Thomas Shillton from Whaddon.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Stoke Hamond against a warrant removing Benjamin Tayler from Mentmore.

 

p. 238.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of John Crosse from Edlesborough to Tuddington, co. Bedford.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Waddesden against a 

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justices’ certificate obtained by the overseers of the Liberty of Westcott that George Thome, the bastard child of Elizabeth Davis, should be settled with his mother at Waddesden.

p. 239. The surveyors of Broughton in Bierton authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

Order dismissing the appeal of Cowley, co. Middlesex, against a warrant removing John Hill from Iver.

p. 240.  Thomas Shilborn, overseer of Ivinghoe, made oath in Court that the following persons had refused to accept apprentices, duly tendered to them in conformity with the acts of 43 Elizabeth, c. 2, and 8 and 9 William III, c. 30: Henry Cowley, gentleman, and Thomas Noar, Bernard Hopkins, alias Jane, and Henry Pitchford, husbandmen, all of Ivinghoe.  [And see p. 368.]

Adjournment of the cases against the inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesden and Henry Stanbridge of Waddesden for non-repair of highways.

Order referring to certain justices the complaint of some of the inhabitants of Aylesbury against the “pretended Custome” of exempting lands of a yearly value of less than £2. 10s. from assessment to the poor rate.  [See p. 263.]

p. 241.  John Ashby of Chesham admitted to a County pension of £2 year.  He produced a certificate that, in 1660, he was “actually a Souldier in the regiment of Andrew, Lord Rutherford, Lord Governor of his Majesties Towne and Garison of Dunkirk, in Lieutennant Colonell Norwood’s Company, under the Comand of the late George, Duke of Albemarle.”

Order referring to certain justices the rating appeal of Mr. Richard Widmer of Chesham.  [See p. 259.]

p. 242.  Benjamin Young of Great Marlow to be paid £2 out of the County funds.  He produced a certificate that 

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“he served his present Majestie in the late Warr against the French by the space of four years in his Majesties Shipp called the Albemarle,” and was wounded.

Mary Chilberry, widow, to be allowed 1s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Taplow.

Order referring to certain justices the bill of Mr. Thomas Williams of Aylesbury, apothecary, for attendance on prisoners in the gaol.

p. 243. Henry Southen to be allowed 1s. 6d a week by the overseers of Beachhampton.

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid 11s. for the funeral expenses of William Wheeler, a prisoner who died in his custody.

Mr. Andrew Miller of Chepping Wycomb asked for an increase in his pension on account of his past services to Charles II and his great age and infirmity.  The Court refused to increase the pension “in regard it was considered the County stock could not bear soe great an Inlargment . . . and this might have provoked others to press the like,” but granted him £2 “as a charitable benevolence.”

Edward Marshall of Chepping Wycomb, a poor debtor in the gaol, admitted to an allowance for “County bread.”

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks, and £2 for a year’s clothing.

p. 244. Order dismissing the appeal of John Rogers junior of Hanley House in Tocester, co. Northampton, against a maintenance order in respect of the bastard son of Mary Letts of Sherrington, servant to William Pinker of Lathbury. He was ordered to pay the overseers of Sherrington £1. 10s. for the first month, and afterwards 1s. 6d. a week until the child was aged seven, when he was to find £5 for him to be put out as an apprentice.

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p. 245.  William Benson, the gaoler, again petitioned that the allowance of £20 a year for “Goale Rent” should be restored to him.  His previous petition for this allowance, four years ago, was granted [See Vol. 4, pp. 163 and 225], and the allowance was continued for two years.  It had been discontinued “for two yeares since by some misrepresentation,” and the Court now appointed certain justices “to attend the Right honorable John Smith, esquire, now Chancellor of his Majesties Court of Exchequer,” in order to have the allowance restored.

p. 246. Recognizances extended.

John Rogers junior, given above on p. 218.

Thomas Goodchild of Dorney in £20, with Richard Sedding and John Galimore, both of Dorney, as sureties in £10 each, for his good behaviour.

p. 247. Recognizances entered into.

Robert Travenor of Twyford, labourer, in £40, with Robert Smyth of Twyford and William Paris of Steeple Ashton, co. Oxford, farmers, as sureties in £20 each, for his appearance in respect of the bastard child of Elizabeth Quainton.

Thomas Twyne, gardener, and John Salter, husbandman, both of Ellesborough, as sureties in £20 each for the appear- ance of William Allen of the same, miller, in the King’s Bench.  Similarly, Allen and Twyne were sureties for Salter’s appearance, and Allen and Salter for Twyne’s appearance.

Richard Jennings of Wendover, turner, and William Edge of Chesham, victualler, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

John Maurice of Bradenham, yeoman, in £40, with John Whitborne, timberman, and John Bray, yeoman, both of the same, as sureties in £20 each, for his appearance in respect of the bastard child of Sarah Neate.

p. 248. Fines and issues.

Richard Grove of Wyrardsbury, gentleman, Daniel 

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Burt of Datchett, Edward Munday of Ellesborough, John Spindler of Long Crendon, Thomas Harding of Weedon in Hardwick, and Henry Harrupp of Sincleborough in Great Horwood, fined £1. 6s. 8d. each for non-appearance on juries.

John Marsh of Swanburne forfeited his recognizance of £10 on account of the non-appearance of himself and Lydia, his wife, and his surety, Edward Hobcroft, forfeited £5.

Christopher Andrews of Taplowe, bargeman, forfeited his recognizance of £100 on account of his non-appearance to prosecute John Tyler.

William Lawrence and William White, both of Great Marlow, labourers, forfeited £5 each on account of the non- appearance of Jane, wife of the former.

p. 249. Recognizances discharged.

Edward Colton, yeoman, and Ambrose Bayly and John Bennell, farmers, all of North Marston, Robert Travenor, labourer, and Robert Smith, farmer, both of Twyford, William Paris of Steeple Ashton, co. Oxford, farmer, John Hopgood of Westcott in Waddesden, farmer, William Bampton of Quainton, yeoman, William Smith, labourer, Cornelius Lattimer, brewer, and John Lawes, mercer, all of Great Marlow, Cornelius Bristowe of Monks Risborough, yeoman, Edward White, glazier, and James Bristowe, yeoman, both of Princes Risborough, Richard Jennings, turner, and John Taylor, tailor, both of Wendover, William King of Ellesborough, warrener, John Money, labourer, William Goldfinch, chandler, Alexander Duncomb, cord- wainer, William Brooks, yeoman, and John Jessett, victualler, all of Aylesbury, Richard Dell, William Smith, Thomas Tredway, John Dell, Timothy Burrowes, Flamock Hodgekins, and Tobias Goodridge, all of Chalfont St. Peters, John Spencer of Burnham, John Maurice, yeoman, and Francis Alice, labourer, both of Bradenham, and John Suddon of Colebrooke.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 250. [Blank.]

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MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

5th October, 1699 [11 William III]

p. 251. Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Brightwell, gentleman, John Lidgold, John Tockfield, John Stanley, Thomas Winckles, Edward Davison, Gustave Horne, gentleman, Thomas Markham, John Whitmill, Thomas Brice, Robert Badrick, Michael Wells, Joseph Wells, junior, Thomas Mabley, and William Baker, senior.

(signed) John Sparkes, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the case against Richard Jennings.

John Cudsden, Samuel Salter, William Robinson, William West, William Turner, Thomas Bull, Edward Beeson, Augustine Shawe, Thomas Barrett, John Gaddesden, Thomas Newell, and John Butler.

(signed) John Sparkes, esquire, sheriff.

p. 252.  The following produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association:” George Clewer, gentleman, mayor of Chepping Wycomb, the Rev. Matthew Bate of Maids Moreton, and the Rev. Thomas Roe of Whitchurch.

pp. 253-254. Indictments.

John Elliott of Pightlestone, labourer, for assaulting Richard Dagnell.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

Robert Corke of Great Missenden, and Sarah, his wife, for assaulting Amy Mansfield, spinster.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Thomas Hoar of Halton, labourer, for refusing to watch.

Mark Fenner of Aylesbury, labourer, for obstructing a watercourse in Aston Clinton.  [Discharged; see p. 292.]

Matthew Dancer of Aylesbury, blacksmith, for refusing to assist the constables.  [Fined 3s. 4d.].

Henry Cocker and Henry Symons, labourers, constables of North Marston, for not bringing in their quarteridge money or their presentments.

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Thomas Elliott senior of Great Marlow, butcher, for hindering the constables.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

William Eldridge of Ellesborough, labourer, for keeping a greyhound and for killing a hare in the grounds of the Rev. William King.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

The inhabitants of Newport Pagnell for not repairing three highways, namely Portfield Way which runs from Stoney Stratford to Great Linford, Tickford End which leads to Wooborne, co. Bedford, and “Le Street” which leads to Olney.

John Leaver of Aylesbury, pin-maker, for assaulting John Ivory.  [Fined 3s. 4d.]

p. 255.  Presentments of the grand jury.

Robert Allen of Fullmer, husbandman, for receiving inmates.

Thomas Bigg, constable of Fullmer, for negligence in his office.

Robert Jeffry of Gawcott in Buckingham, husbandman, for blocking up the highway to Tingwick.

The inhabitants of Cuddington for not repairing part of the highway from Thame, co. Oxford, to Aylesbury at a place called Littleworth.  [See p. 332.]

Robert Hebberd senior and Thomas Brandon, surveyors of Aston Clinton, for negligence in their office.  [Fined £2; see p. 292.]

[Blank] Woodfind of Radcliffe, widow, for not repairing part of the highway from Tingwick to Buckingham, between Drapshont House and the Hollow at a place called Conduit Ground.  [Discharged on certificate.]

The inhabitants of Buckingham for not repairing part of the highway to Tingwick between Dudley Bridge and Salisbury Plain.

Edward Sear of Drayton Beauchamp for riding on the bank of a stream in Aston Clinton Park and breaking down the banks so that the stream overflowed.

p. 256. Informations.

Aaron Geary, William Nash senior, Thomas Pierce, 

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Thomas Castle, and John Austin, all of Chesham, John Gigger of Chalvey, John Mold of Fingest, Robert Wingrave of Chepping Wycomb, and William Fellowes of Little Brickhill, all labourers, for trading as badgers and kidders without being licensed.

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, [Ann] Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, Mary Brinckhurst, Sir Edward Longuevile, Michael Anthony, and John Oakly, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Matthew Dancer of Aylesbury, blacksmith, for refusing to assist the constable.

Mark Fenner of St. Leonards in Aston Clinton for “turning the water out of the water course which feedeth Thomas Kingham’s Mill.”

Henry Cocker and Henry Symons, constables of North Marston, and Thomas Hunt and John Cannon, constables of Chalfont St. Peters, for making no presentments.

p. 257. Petty constables sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Weston Turvile . . William Henley and Joseph Martin vice Thomas Young and Thomas Tuffin.

Burnham hundred—

Chalfont St. Gyles . . Frederick Nash and Thomas Saunders vice Thomas Ewer and William Bodington.

Chesham Boyes . . Thomas Larkin vice John Parrat.

Penn . . . . John Fryer of Horsemore vice Edward Fellowes.

Cottesloe hundred—

Drayton Beauchamp John Birch senior vice Joseph Martin.

Weedon in Hardwick Richard Crosse vice [Blank].

Whaddon . . . . Thomas Willis vice Richard Lane.

Desborow hundred—

Saunderton . . . . Henry Newell vice Thomas Jackman.

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MICHAELMAS SESSION, 1699

Chepping Wycomb William Sparkes vice James Wyer.

Forrens

Orders.

p. 258.  Order estreating the recognizance of Thomas Goodchild on account of his non-appearance.

Richard Harrison, who had been three months in the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb for running away from his family and leaving them chargeable to the parish, to be discharged.

p. 259.  The case against Henry Stanbridge was adjourned upon his undertaking to produce a certificate that the work had been done.  [See p. 225.]

The trustees “on behalf of the poor of Brill” certified that Thomas Berry had been elected as a trustee “for the managing of a certain Meadow called Poor Folks Pasture, lying within the parish of Borstall,” in place of the late John Cubbidge.  The election was confirmed by the Court, and the certificate ordered to be filed with the records of the Court.

Order confirming the report of certain justices in the rating appeal of Mr. Richard Widmer of Chesham.  The report stated “that James Atkinson should pay 16s., part of the £5 charged upon the said Richard Widmer for the Mill and Clay pitts he holds, being part of Cowcroft Farm, and that . . . Widmer should be discharged from 16s.”

p. 260.  Order confirming the report of certain justices upon the dispute between Richard Dell and the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Peters.  The report decided that Dell was entitled to £8. 10s. “for his Constable’s Bill, and the exceeding great charges the parish had obstinately put him to.”  The amount originally claimed was £1. 15s. 1d. but the inhab- itants had procured the adjournment of the case several times.  [See pp. 196 and 295.]

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Order extending the recognizance of John Rogers in connection with the maintenance order against him, as Richard Rogers certified that he was “now under a surgeon’s hands and unable without great danger to his health to appear.”  [See pp. 228 and 244.]

p. 261.  Further reference of the rating appeal of Mr. Robert Thorpe of Hardwick.

Mr. Richard Gosnold of Woborne ordered to pay £3. 5s. 9d. for work done for him by the children of William Man of Little Marlow, and Catherine, his wife.  [See p. 301.]

John Rose, Matthew Annesly, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

p. 262.  Richard Woodhouse of Denham, who was committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb for deserting his family, to be discharged.

p. 263.  The Court approved of the report of certain justices upon the complaint of some of the inhabitants of Aylesbury that lands of the value of £2. 10s. and under were exempted from assessment to poor rate and that this “pretended Custom” was being abused.  It was ordered that in future assessments should be made on all lands, etc., “as well under the yearly value of 50s. as over that value, att such yearly value as the same are really and bona fide worth, to be lett without any Fine or other Consideration payd had or done . . . for the same, and that no person be Exempted from such taxation within the said parish but such onely as the persons meeting at the Vestrys duely to be warned . . . shall from time to time think fitt to Exempt, by reason of his or her poverty onely, any Custom or usage heretofore had or used within the said parish to the contrary in any wise notwithstanding.”  [See p. 240.]

p. 264.  The Court confirmed the report of certain justices upon the dispute between Fenny Stratford and Bow Brickhill. It was decided that “the manner of Conveying Cripples from 

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Fenny Stratford aforesaid upwards towards London hath always bene from Fenny Stratford aforesaid unto Little Brickhill . . . and that the highway or Roade from . . . Fenny Stratford upwards towards London leadeth directly to and through the Town of Little Brickhill aforesaid and not to the Town of Bow Brickhill, and that no part of the Town of Bow Brickhill but one small Cottage lieth near the Road.”

p. 265.  Daniel Crawley of Pightlestone ordered to pay James Horne £1 for wages due.

Order allowing the appeal of Drayton Beauchamp against a warrant removing Edward Bourton, with his wife and family, from Waddesden.

p. 266.  Order allowing the appeal of Grendon Underwood against a warrant removing James Delafield, with his wife and two children, from Waddesden.

Order confirming the imposition of the fine on John Spindler of Long Crendon for non-attendance on a jury. He appealed to the Court to be excused on account of illness. [See p. 248.]

The surveyors of Long Crendon authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

p. 267.  Orders extending the recognizances of Edward Lered of Amersham and Henry Millett of Chertsey, co. Surrey.

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of William Curtis, with his wife and two children, from North Crawley to Benifield, co. Northampton

p. 268.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Charles Rivers from Great Marlow to Trinity Minories, co. Middlesex.

John Sutton of Wendover ordered to pay Martha Phillips the wages due to her.

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Order declaring that a certificate for the settlement of William Grainge at Great Missenden, made out by Mr. Dolben and the churchwardens of Wendover and signed by certain justices, was void on account of it “not being Attested by any Witnesses.”

p. 269.  Further adjournment of the appeal of Parsnam, co. Northampton.

Order for the release of Thomas Weedon of Woborn, who was arrested for debt at the suit of Richard Spratley when he came to the Court to give evidence in another case.

Order estreating the recognizance of William Edge of Chesham, victualler, on account of his non-appearance.

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Sarah Neate from Bradenham to Stewkley.

p. 270.  Order remitting the fine imposed upon Thomas Goldwin of Burnham for non-attendance on a jury, as he was over seventy years of age.

Order adjourning the case against Westcott in Waddesden for non-repair of their highways.

Order estreating the recognizance of Charles Emans of Aylesbury, innholder, who was bound over to appear and answer for “a violent breach of the Peace,” but had since absconded.  His sureties were John Gascoign of Aylesbury, innholder, and William Betham of Water Stratford, yeoman.  The former being now dead, only the latter’s recognizance was to be estreated.

p. 271.  Orders extending the recognizances of Robert Travenor and John Leaver.

Mary Pratt, widow, to be paid £14. 17s. for bread supplied to prisoners in the gaol.

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Robert North, a poor debtor in the gaol, “admitted to the County Bread.”

p. 272.  Order increasing the County pension of Christopher Martin from £2 to £4 a year.  He pleaded that he had served Charles II “as a souldier or common seaman in his Majesties Ship called the Yarmouth under the command of Captain Parker,” and had suffered wounds which prevented him from working.

Thomas Gulliver and Thomas Preston, both of Chesham, to be paid 10s. each out of the County funds.  They claimed that they had been several times wounded when they “served as a souldier in the late Civil Warrs of England.”

p. 273.  Henry James of Chepping Wycomb Forrens admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate that he served Charles II as a “Quarter Master in the Troop of Captain William Helling in the Regiment of the right honorable Major generall Morgan and was dis- banded by Act of Parliament in the year 1660.”

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £6. 15s., spent by him upon the hire of two wagons to convey prisoners to the last Assizes.

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 12s. 6d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks.

p. 274.  Edward Marshall, a poor debtor in the gaol, and formerly an officer of excise, to be paid £6 out of the County funds to obtain his release so that he might be able to support his wife and family, which he was “by his Education enabled” to do.

Mr. Burnham, the deputy sheriff, to be paid £20 for work done on behalf of the County.

Mr. Thomas Smith, the clerk of the peace, to be paid £5 for work done on behalf of the County.

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p. 275. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of William Mountague [see p. 165], Richard Jennings, Elizabeth Allen, and Richard Allen [see p. 225], Robert Corke, Sarah Corke, and Thomas Elliott [see p. 253].

p. 276. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: John Rogers (p. 218) and Robert Travenor (p. 247).

John Leaver of Aylesbury, pin-maker, in £10, with John Edmonds, baker, and Thomas Colsell, labourer, both of the same, as sureties in £5 each, for assaulting John Ivory.

Edward Leared of Amersham, husbandman, in £40, with Richard Todd, baker, and William Mackmillian, chapman, both of the same, as sureties in £30 each, to appear and answer.

Richard Gosnold of Woburn, gentleman, in £10, with Charles Blewett, surgeon, and John Rivers, innholder, both of Great Marlow, as sureties in £10 each, to answer for not paying William Mann his wages.

Henry Millett of Chertsey, co. Surrey, carpenter, in £20, with William Hall of the same, innholder, as surety in £10, to keep the peace.

Recognizances entered into.

John Elliott of Pightlestone, labourer, and Jonathan Lander of Upton, labourer, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

pp. 277-278. Fines and issues.

John Hobbs and Mark Harris, both of Great Linford, William Foskett of North Crawley, Christopher Pain of Cheddington, and William Smith of Hulcott, fined £1. 6s. 8d. each for non-attendance on juries.

Thomas Goodchild of Dorney forfeited his recognizance of £20 for non-appearance, and his sureties, Richard Sedding and John Gallemore, both of Dorney, forfeited £10 each.

Charles Eman of Aylesbury, gentleman, similarly forfeited 

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£80, and William Betham of Water Stratford, yeoman, forfeited £40.

William Edge of Chesham, victualler, similarly forfeited £40.

John Rivers, innholder, and William Carter, yeoman, both of Great Marlow, forfeited £20 each on account of the non-appearance of Charles Rivers.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 275.

p. 279. Recognizances discharged.

John Maurice, yeoman, John Whitborne, timberman, and John Bray, yeoman, all of Bradenham, John Perryman of Farnham Royal, yeoman, Edward Messon and James Stile, both of Burnham, yeoman, John Brown of Taplow, yeoman, Leonard Drew and Richard Heritage, paper-maker, both of Wyrardsbury, Sarah, wife of Robert Cork, alias Johnson, Francis Pain, tailor, and Benjamin Brotherton, butcher, all of Great Missenden, John Sutton, collar-maker, and Henry Hoar, tanner, both of Wendover, Daniel Crawley, John Sawell, and Joseph Mead, yeomen, and John Elliott, farmer, all of Pightlestone, Mary Harris, alias Gibbons, Thomas Burton, victualler, John Carter, labourer, John Gaddesden, paper-maker, Robert Oxlade, William Frances, tailor, Edward Phillips, miller, Isaac Hunt, mealman, Martin Miller, bricklayer, William Toms, labourer, and Benjamin Stuble, all of Chepping Wycomb, William Honnor, husband- man, Thomas Beaver, labourer, John Reeve, Mary Davis, spinster, Daniel Jesse junior, bargeman, Ambrose Tompson, blacksmith, Thomas Elliott, butcher, John Stevens, whar- finger, and Jeremiah Goodchild, yeoman, all of Great Marlow, Thomas Nevill of Taplow, husbandman, James Stile of Burnham, yeoman, John Mildmay of Wendover, labourer, Francis Mildmay, labourer, and Henry Fryer, butcher, both of Wendover, George Glanvile of Horton, paper-maker, John Hankinson and James Chearsley, both of Amersham, architects.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 280. [Blank.]

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EPIPHANY SESSION

AT WENDOVER

11th January, 1699-1700 [11 William III]

p. 281. Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Brookes, William Welles, John Wade, Edward Stone, Thomas Tuffin, John Olliffe, Anthony Davies, John Ware, John Theed, Roger Butterfield, Richard Saywell, George Stone, Robert Fellow, Thomas Course, Thomas Norbury, John Cox, and Robert Scott.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the case against Jonathan Lander.

Thomas Ray senior, Thomas Baldwin, John Penning, Edward Thompson, William Robinson, Henry White, Richard Wade, Richard Gurney, Richard Harley, William Gaffield, Thomas Mabley, and Thomas King.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

p. 282.  The Rev. Richard Evans, rector of Hulcott, produced a sacrament certificate, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association.”

The houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses: Nathaniel Nash, Richard Harvie, and John Falconer, all of Aston Clinton, and Richard Knight, Francis Knight, and Robert James, all of Horton in Ivinghoe.

p. 283. Indictments.

James Mandrill of Aylesbury, labourer, for stealing a bushel of wheat and three pecks of malt from George Randall. [To be whipped; see p. 293.]

Anthony Goodman of Woofton, wheelwright, for assault- ing Thomas Newman at Simpson.  [Not guilty.]

John Wingfield of Fulmer, labourer, for assaulting Robert Littler.  [Fined 13s. 4d.]

William Sparkes of Chepping Wycomb Forrens, yeoman, for assaulting Joseph Steele, the constable.  [Not guilty.]

George Welles of Wavendon, gentleman, for not 

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scouring a ditch between a piece of land called The Headland, belonging to Bernard Gregory, and the road to Hogsty End.

John Cunningham of Sherrington, labourer, for taking in Edward Reynolds and [Blank] Crookes as inmates.  [Fined 10s.]

Henry Gillett of Aylesbury, labourer, for stealing a waistcoat from Charles Verey [To be whipped ; see p. 293.]

Francis Read of Chepping Wycomb, labourer, for stealing a silver spoon from Sarah Child.  [To be whipped; see p. 293.]

Thomas Pratt and William Brookes, constables of Aylesbury, for allowing William Sheene to escape from their custody.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]

Thomas Weedon junior of Edlesborough, labourer, for keeping a net and taking game.

p. 284. Presentments of the grand jury.

Samuel Bampton and William Lyndon, surveyors of Aylesbury, for not repairing Walton Street.

The inhabitants of Princes Risborow for not repairing ”Le Street.”  [Discharged on certificate.]

p. 285. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longuevile, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Lawrence Oxley of Aylesbury, “for altering his name and Cheating the Country by Collecting money by pretended losses by a fire in Walton, when in truth he susteined no damage thereby.”  [See p. 316.]

John Howe, constable of Lee, for conveying vagrants by an unlawful pass to Wendover instead of to Great Missenden.

John Yate, fellmonger, and Stephen Bluck, cordwainer, both of Newport Pagnell, for encroaching upon the waste of the manor there, which belongs to the Dowager Countess of Anglisea.

John Powell of Newport Pagnell, barber, for refusing to assist the constables.

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Thomas Saul, constable of Hanslop, for not bringing in his presentments or his quarteridge money to Thomas Hodgskin, the chief constable.

Thomas Seare, constable of Neither Winchendon, for a similar neglect to Thomas Hughes, the chief constable.

John Madge of Long Crendon “for selling Mercery ware contrary to the Statute as also hott liquors on the Sabboath day to the breach of the Sabboath and debauching of Youth.”

Stephen Peele and William Beasly, both of Iver, for taking in inmates.

p. 286.  John Randolph junior of Long Crendon sworn chief constable for Ashenden in place of Richard Emerton, who has gone to live in Oxfordshire.

Petty constables sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Wendover Forrens  John Norfolke vice Robert Dossett.

Ashenden hundred—

Brill . . . . Robert Cubbidge vice Richard Hawes.

Burnham hundred—

Boveny in Burnham John Apleby vice John Hunt.

East Burnham and Richard Compton vice Thomas Britwell . . Andrews.

Stoke hundred—

Denham Town . . Robert Hawkins vice [Thomas Holland].

Denham Parish . . John Stanlock vice [Edward Chambers]

Desborow hundred—

Forrens of Chepping Wycomb:

Liberty of Bassetts Bury  John Russell and John Dean senior   vice [Blank.]

Liberty of Temple Wycomb John Sharpe and John Dean junior   vice [Blank].

Orders.

p. 287.  The mayor and recorder of the corporation of Chepping Wycomb informed the Court that “the Forrens and parish of Chepping Wycomb lye within the precincts of 

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severall Court Leets and, by the Omission of due keeping such Courts, Petty Constables have been of late years irregularly Continued and uncertainly appointed, whereby the Extents of the respective libertyes is grown doubtfull and the Constables less vigilant in their respective divisions and the King’s business neglected, even to the Retarding of Justice.”  The Court ordered that constables should at once be appointed and that they should endeavour “to revive the Exact Jurisdictions of the severall Leets.”

Order for the due return of the writ of certiorari removing the recognizances of Samuel Edwyn, esquire, and Richard Watkins, gentleman, into the King’s Bench.

pp. 288-289.  Long order concerning illegal passes for vagrants, which directed that in future the provisions of the act of 39 Elizabeth, c. 4, must be strictly followed, and that no passes signed by the justices, or other officers, of “foreign Counties” should have any effect.  A pass, for it to receive notice from the officers of a parish, must be signed in due form by two or more justices of the peace for the county of Buckingham.  The clerk of the peace was ordered to have copies of this order printed and distributed to all the chief and petty constables in the County.

p. 290.  The inhabitants of Beconsfield complained that they had been forced to maintain Ann Hone, a vagrant, suffering from small pox, in the following circumstances. She was being conveyed on a pass, signed by Mr. Heyes, the minister, and Josiah Grover and Robert Fellow, constables, of Chesham, who stated on the pass that she had been apprehended in their town “sick and weak and in a low condition and that they had relieved and whipped her.”  She had been conveyed on this pass, “from tything to tything,” from Chesham to the county of Middlesex, where she was turned back, and reached Beconsfield via Hugely. The officers of Beconsfield, noting her “low and weak condition” and the fact that the small-pox was “visibly upon her,” had no option but to take her in and provide for her at great expense and at great risk to the health of their parish.

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The Court ordered the minister and constables of Chesham to be bound over for this serious irregularity, which was “not onely Inhumane (their own certificate shewing that in the sad and languishing condition of the woman they whipped her and exposed her to the Cold) but contrary to law and the rules and Orders of this Court.”  The question of the settlement of Ann Hone was refered to the justices for the hundreds of Burnham and Stoke.

p. 291.  Order referring to certain justices the complaint of Iver that the parish was over-assessed for their contribution to the quarterly money for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea and for the maimed soldiers.  [See p. 361.]

p. 292.  Order discharging the indictment against Mark Fenner, for obstructing a watercourse, as it did not appear “to lye before this Court.”  [See p. 253.]

Order that the fine imposed upon Robert Hebberd and Thomas Brandon, surveyors of Aston Clinton, for negligence in their office, should be paid to the sheriff, as provided by the statute.  The act of 5 Elizabeth, c. 13, provides, in section 8 (2), for a fine of £2.

p. 293.  Order that James Mandrill, Henry Gillett, and Francis Read, convicted of larceny, should be fastened to the ”tayle of a Cart and openly and publicly drawn gently from the goal door through the Street of Aylesbury to the George Inn there and so round the George Sign Post and back again to the Goal door,” and whipped by “the Executioner” until “their bodies be respectively bloody.”  [See p. 283.]

Order discharging the recognizance of Thomas Heath of Long Crendon to appear and prosecute Thomas Goodeing junior.

p. 294.  Order allowing the appeal of Lee, alias Lea, against a warrant removing Humphrey Hind and his family from Wendover.

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Order allowing the appeal of Sanderton against a warrant removing Francis Doney and Jane, his wife, from Hugenden.

p. 295.  Further adjournment of the case against Henry Stanbridge.

Order referring to certain justices the rating appeal of Mr. John Wigson of Aylesbury.

Writ of certiorari removing the dispute between Richard Dell and the inhabitants of Chalfont St. Peter.  [See p. 260.]

Order dismissing the appeal of Nash in Whaddon against a warrant removing John Saunders and his wife from Winslow.

p. 296.  The inhabitants of Westcott in Waddesden discharged from the indictment against them upon producing a justices’ certificate.  [See p. 190.]

Order allowing the appeal of Flanden against a warrant removing Thomas Welling from Chesham.

p. 297.  Order referring the rating appeal of Mr. John White of Chesham to certain justices.

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Mary Rogers, widow, from Edgcott to Lamport in Stowe.

Order allowing the appeal of Wendover against a warrant removing John Balaam from Waddesden.

p. 298.  Order allowing the appeal of Monks Risborow against a warrant removing Edward Jigger from Great Missenden.

Adjournment of the appeal of Cublington against a warrant removing John Webbe from Wing.  [See p. 331.]

p. 299.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Parsnam, co. Northampton, against a warrant removing Edward Mead from Stewkley.

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John Rose, Matthew Annesly, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

p. 300.  By previous orders Elizabeth Mushett, alias Thruston, was adjudged to be an inhabitant of Aylesbury but was sent on her way towards Scotland to join her husband [see pp. 128 and 149].  Since then she had been arrested, with her child, as a vagrant at Northampton and sent back by pass to East Cleydon, her birthplace.  The vicar and constables thereupon certified her as a vagrant beggar, whipped her, and sent her and her child to Aylesbury.  The inhabitants of Aylesbury returned her to East Cleydon in conformity with the act of 39 Elizabeth, c. 4, which provides that a vagrant beggar “shall be sent to the parish where he or she was born if the same be known and if not then to the parish where he or she last dwelt for the space of one year.” The opinion of the Court was now asked as to what further action should be taken, as East Cleydon threatened to return her to Aylesbury.  The Court ordered that she must now be settled at East Cleydon.

p. 301.  The same Elizabeth Mushett complained that the overseers of East Cleydon have “mixed her with so great a Number of persons in one Tenement that they are almost stifled destitute of that due Convenience of Habitation that is necessary for the preservation of their Healths and dressing provisions for their subsistence and washing and other business incident thereunto.”  The Court ordered that she should be given proper accommodation.

Order estreating the recognizance of Mr. Richard Gosnold of Woburne for not obeying an order to pay certain wages to the children of Catherine and William Man.  [See p. 261.]

p. 302.  Order excusing Mr. John Hutchins of Brill from attendance on the grand jury owing to “very great occasions.”

Adjournment of the imposition of fines upon the in- habitants of Newport Pagnell and Buckingham, and upon Mrs. Woodfinde.

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An order made a year ago concerning the dispute between Edward Sheppard and the inhabitants of Weedon in Hard- wick was renewed, as it had not yet been acted upon. [See p. 174.]

p. 303.  Order dismissing the appeal of Wendover against a warrant removing Ann Clark from Aylesbury.

The clerk of the peace ordered to “search what Orders have been heretofore made in this Court relating to the Repairs of the great Bridge at Woxbridge Townes End over the River which divides this County from the County of Middlesex,” and to report at the next session.  [See p. 342.]

Order referring to certain justices the rating appeals of Mr. Thomas Olliffe, Mr. William Morgan, Mr. Francis Mangie, William Batt, William Welch senior, Robert Holland, and other inhabitants of Aylesbury.

p. 304.  Mary Wellins to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Chesham.

William Benson, the gaoler, to be paid £7. 6s. for repairs done to the gaol.

Mary Pratt, widow, to be paid £23. 13s. 6d. for baking the County bread.

p. 305.  The bill of Mr. Thomas Williams of Aylesbury, apothecary, for medicines supplied to prisoners in the gaol, was referred to the scrutiny of certain justices.

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

p. 306.  Order that William Fowler should be kept “in constant work” by the overseers of Aston Clinton, failing which they should allow him 2s. 6d. a week.

The treasurers for the maimed soldiers ordered to give in their account books to the clerk of the peace.

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John Hunt to be allowed 2s. a week by the overseers of Chilton.

p. 307.  Memorandum that Isaac Beddall, John Johnson, William Parker, William Leech, Thomas Read, and William Dawney, bailiffs of the various hundreds, took the oaths provided in the acts of 27 Elizabeth, c. 12, and 1 William and Mary, c. 1.

Memorandum that “his Majesties Royall proclamation bearing Teste at Kensington the nineth day of December, 1699 . . . for preventing and punishing Immorality and Prophanness was publicly Read in open Court.”

p. 308. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of John Elliott, Robert Hebberd, Thomas Brandon, and Matthew Dancer [see p. 253], John Lever [see p. 254], John Wingfield, James Mandrill, Henry Gillett, and Francis Read [see p. 283], and the acquittals of Jonathan Lander and Sarah, his wife [see p. 225].

p. 309. Recognizances extended.

Richard Gosnold, given above on p. 276.

John Robinson of Winslow, tailor, in £10, with William Norris, barber, and Benjamin Saunders, baker, both of Winslow, as sureties in £5 each, to keep the peace.  The same two persons were also sureties in £5 each for Mary, wife of John Robinson, to keep the peace.

Thomas Boswell of Brill, butcher, in £20, with Henry Clark, yeoman, and Jeremiah Largman, collar-maker, both of Chilton, as sureties in £10 each, to keep the peace towards Elizabeth Heath.

Recognizances entered into.

Thomas Milward of East Cleydon, yeoman, William Sparkes of Chepping Wycomb Forrens, yeoman, Anthony Goodman of Woofton, wheelwright, and William Lambert and Joseph Rose, both of Cuddington, gentlemen, in £40 each, to appear and answer.

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p. 310. Fines and issues.

Jonas Humfry of Wycomb Forrens, John Goodman of Woughton, and Richard Wise of Foscott, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 308.

p. 311. Recognizances discharged.

John Rogers junior and John Rogers senior, both of Handly House in Torcester, co. Northampton, Thomas Norman of Wood Burcott, Robert Travenor, labourer, and Robert Smith, farmer, both of Twiford, William Paris of Steeple Ashton, co. Oxford, farmer, John Leaver, pin-maker, John Edmonds, baker, and Thomas Colesell, labourer, all of Aylesbury, Edward Leared, farmer, Richard Todd, baker, and William Mackmillian, chapman, all of Amersham, Henry Millett, carpenter, and William Hall, innholder, both of Chertsey, co. Surrey, Thomas Spooner, William Norris, barber, and Benjamin Saunders, baker, all of Winslow, John Wingfield of Fulmer, warrener, Edward Burnham, labourer, and Thomas Gooding, carpenter, both of Long Crendon, Henry Clark and William Clark, yeomen, and Jeremiah Largman, collar-maker, all of Chilton, John Brown, yeoman, and Thomas, his son, John Dawson, yeoman, and Thomas Nevill and Robert Beck, farmers, all of Taplow, Anthony Goodman, wheelwright, and Thomas Davers, farmer, both of Woughton, Richard Goodman of Simpson, farmer, Charles Vere, butcher, and Joseph Welch, ironmonger, both of Chesham, and Thomas Heath of Long Crendon, mason.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 312. [Blank].

 

 

EASTER SESSION

AT BUCKINGHAM

11th April, 1700 [12 William III]

p. 313. Jurors for the body of the county.

William Perkins junior, Richard Ashwell, Thomas 

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Taylor, Henry Curtis, Thomas Oakley, Richard White, John Hobbs, Edward Hooton, Thomas Pursell, Thomas Bampton, Michael Welles, Edward Munday, Henry Chapman, Jonas Bird, and Samuel Smith.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the cases against William Sparkes, Anthony Goodman, Thomas Millward, and the inhabitants of Cuddington.

William Tompkins, John Cooke, Thomas Tipping, Nathaniel Child, John Goodman, Richard Goodman, William Meads, Samuel Bell, Francis Read, Charles Blunt, Thomas Holton, and Thomas Gurney.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

p. 314.  Abraham Carter and Thomas Russon, bailiffs of Chepping Wycomb, produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association.”

The barn occupied by Ann Truelock at Marsh Gibbon was registered as a meeting house.

p. 315. Convictions of swearers.

Francis Thompson of Iver, labourer, fined 5s. for five oaths, on the evidence of Richard Shaw.

Thomas Stevens, butcher, and Richard Munday, carpenter, both of Wendover, fined 2s. each for one oath, on the evidence of Richard Shaw.

p. 316. Indictments.

Lawrence Oxley of Walton in Aylesbury, yeoman, for obtaining money under false pretences.  [Fined £2. 2s.; and see p. 285.]  (Sess. R. 1/6.)

Thomas Saul, labourer, constable of Hanslop, for not giving in his presentments.  Thomas Hodgskin prosecuted. (Sess. R. 1/7, 1/8.)

Richard Mason of Amersham, labourer, for falsely accusing John Tanner, gentleman, of inciting him to murder Timothy Child.  Thomas Horwood prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 1/9.)

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William Beasley and Stephen Peile, both of Iver, labourers, for taking in inmates.  Richard Killingsworth and Nicholas Fennell, constables, prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 1/10, 1/11.)

Daniel Anderson of Amersham, lace-buyer, for concealing and detaining a book containing the poor rates.  Timothy Wingfield and Timothy Child, overseers, prosecuted.  [Fined 3s. 4d.] (Sess. R. 1/12.)

Richard Masson of Amersham, labourer, for night walking.  (Sess. R. 1/13.)

The inhabitants of Winslow for not repairing part of the highway to Buckingham, at a place called Gallows Gapp. John Owen and Robert Stutsbury prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 1/14.)

The inhabitants of Padbury for not repairing part of the highway from Winslow to Buckingham, between Padbury Field and Women’s Gapp.  The same prosecutors as above. [Discharged on certificate.] (Sess. R. 1/15.)

p. 317. Presentments of the grand jury.

Henry Andrews, esquire, and James Betts, both of Lathbury, for not repairing a footpath over Pinkerds Pastures, which leads from Newport Pagnell to Northampton. (Sess. R. 1/17.)

Richard Marriott of Castle Thrupp, Richard Miles and Edward Ewester [Ewstace], both of Hanslop, Daniel Norris and Robert Page, both of Wavendon, and Thomas Saxby of Haversham, all lace-buyers, for travelling to London on a Sunday to sell their goods.  [The first four fined 5s. each.] (Sess. R. 1/18, 1/19, 1/20.)

William Manning of Newport Pagnell, victualler, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.  (Sess. R. 1/21.)

Nicholas Aries of Water Stratford, labourer, for not repairing part of the lane which runs from Pingsford to Aylesbury.  [Discharged on certificate.] (Sess. R. 1/22.)

Henry Tredway of Gerrards Crosse in Chalfont St. Peter for not repairing part of the highway from Pitchcott to Aylesbury, at Pitchcott Grounds.  (Sess. R. 1/23.)

The following petty constables were presented for not seeing that correct measures were used in the markets of their respective towns: Thomas Pratt and William Brooks, 

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of Aylesbury; Benjamin Saunders and William Saunders [Perkins], of Winslow; Josias Grover and Robert Fellow, of Chesham; and William Hobbs and Henry Norwood, of Amersham.  [See pp. 371 and 408.] (Sess. R. 1/24, 1/25, 1/28, 1/29.)

George Clewer senior, mayor of Chepping Wycombe, and Hugh Arnett, gentleman, bailiff of Buckingham, were presented for a similar offence.  [Adjourned sine die, see p. 270.] (Sess. R. 1/26, 1/27.)

p. 318. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longvill, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

Benjamin Saunders and William Perkins, constables of Shipton in Winslow, for “not presenting the highwayes.”

George Page and William Arnett, constables of Aston Abbotts, for not presenting Joseph Hedges for selling ale without a licence.

Thomas Gilbert, constable of Wing, and the constables of Choulsbury for not bringing in their presentments.

Richard Killingsworth and Nicholas Fennill, constables of Iver, for not paying in their quarterly money to Zebulon Hawkins, the chief constable.

p. 319. Chief constables sworn.

Aylesbury . . Edward Munday of Ellesborow and Richard Stratford of Burcott in Beirton vice Robert Reynolds and Thomas Jackson.

Newport . . . . John Rudey of Sherington and John Chevall of Great Woolston vice Thomas Hodgkins and John Gregory.

Buckingham . . William Parker of Marsh Gibbon and Robert Peridge of Biddlesden vice Daniel Elliott and John Adams.

Cottesloe . . Joseph Batts of Drayton Beauchamp 

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EASTER SESSION, 1700

and James Lucas of Cublington vice William Peile and Richard Redding.

Ashenden . . Thomas Mountague of Grandborough and William Cursons of Chersley vice Thomas Hughes and John Randolph.

Stoke . . . . Richard Finch of Iver and Francis Bowrey of Wyrardsbury vice Zebulon Hawkins and William Lyford.

Desborough . . Henry White of Radnage and John Janes of North End vice William Freer and Matthew Medwin.

Burnham . . . . Henry Messenger of Boveney in Burnham and Daniel Harding of Amersham, butcher, vice James Stile and John Bovingdon.

Treasurers sworn.

For the King’s Bench and Marshalsea    Thomas Leeky of Hugenden and  Christopher Paine of Cheddington  vice Jonathan Grove and William   Glenister.

For the maimed soldiers   Henry Plaistow of Wendover and  Josias Askew of Swanburne, gentlemen, vice Henry Babham and John   Deverell.

pp. 320-322. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Bransfee . . . . Philip Redding vice Thomas Hudson, and John Stevens as tithingman vice John Chearsley.

Broughton in Bierton  William Cripps and Henry King vice Richard Fulkes and Thomas Jordain.

Bishopstone . . William Jennings vice Michael Andrews.

Ellesborough . . John Prince and Geoffrey Hill vice John Hitchcock and William Allen.

Little Kimble . . Joseph Allen vice John Howes.

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Hulcott . . . . Richard Thorne vice Gilbert Hassell.

Little Missenden . . Thomas Graveney vice Thomas Harris.

Great Missenden . . Edward Hoare senior and John Bennett senior vice Thomas Todd senior and Francis Paine senior,

Potterow in Great Missenden   Edward Davison senior and Thomas  Honner as tithingmen vice William   Crutch and Paul Hearne.

Parsons Fee in Aylesbury  Thomas Chilton and William Ray vice . .  Thomas Lee and John Humfrey.

Princes Risborow . . James Greening and William Redding vice William Wade and John Winch.

Walton in Aylesbury  Thomas Dover and John Cox vice  Richard Wootten and [Thomas Sheene].

Newport hundred—

Bletchley . . . . Stephen Daniell vice Robert Fellowes.

Clifton Raynes . . William Huddell vice Richard Smith.

Eaton . . . . John Tayler vice John Goodman.

Haversham . . Samuel Pallord vice James Coall.

Calverton . . John Clark and William Somes vice William Sturch and William Polter.

Middleton Kaines . . William Head vice William Pancruft.

Sherington . . John Cunningham and Samuel Cunningham vice Thomas Vinney and Anthony Lighting.

Simpson . . . . George Etheridge and John Edwin vice William Sear and John London.

Stoke Goldington . . Benjamin Butcher vice Thomas Hooton.

Stoke Hamond . . Thomas Hurnall and John Turney vice Lawrence King and John Francklin.

Stoney Stratford West Side . . Peter Harris vice Richard Change.

Wavendon . . . . Edward Peirce vice Thomas Plowman.

Walton . . . . John Honyburn senior vice Roger Gosse.

Little Woolston . . John Judge vice Thomas Binion.

Buckingham hundred—

Addington . . Richard Smith vice [William] Capp. 

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Ashenden hundred—

Borstall . . . . Thomas Webb vice Thomas Winslow.

Chersley . . . . John Nickols vice William Cousin.

Kingsey . . . . John Birch vice [George Livingston].

Quainton . . . . William Robinson vice Thomas Neale.

Studley . . . . Robert Saunders vice Thomas Walington.

Wornall . . . . John Woodbridge vice Thomas Munt.

Upper Winchendon  John Young vice Edward Barnard.

Cotesloe hundred—

Cheddington . . Edward Newines junior vice Daniel Parteridge.

Cublington . .  James Gardner and Robert Fincher vice John Grove and John Lucas.

Cuddington . .  William Dickson vice [Blank].

Drayton Parslow . . William Rutland and Philip Bates vice Thomas Welles and John Pateman.

Dunton . . . . William Thorpe vice Edward Duncomb.

Mentmore . . . . Geoffrey Bampton and Richard Knight vice Thomas Fountain and Thomas Spencer.

Linslad . . . . George Nash vice Robert Cock.

Salden in Mursley Philip Adams and Richard Chantrill vice Thomas Illmore and Richard Collier.

Nash in Whadden . . Marmaduke Chapell vice John Cole.

Slapton . . . . James Twiney senior vice Henry Eames.

Swanburne . . John Hawkins and William Lane vice John Gilbert and Thomas Henley.

Stewkley . . . . Richard Brise vice John Green.

Wing . . . . William Higgs and William Hawkins vice Thomas Stevens and Thomas Gilbert.

Wingrave . . George Chandler vice Thomas Keen.

Burnham hundred—

Beconsfield . . William Harding and Samuel Roades vice Robert Bates and John Gregory, and Thomas Grove as tithingman vice Henry Fellowes.

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Cheynes . . . . John Lewis vice Ralph Skudemore.

Dorney . . . . Nathaniel Hunt vice John Gallimore.

Hitcham . . . . Richard Holderness vice Richard Dell.

Desborow hundred—

Bradenham . . Richard Lambert vice Francis Alice.

Bassetts Bury in

Chepping Wycomb James Heathorne vice John Deane.

Hugenden . . Joseph Mouring vice Francis Smith.

Hambledon . . William Hobbs and Abraham Deane vice Robert Rockall and John Rockall.

Medmenham . . John Comins vice John Austin.

Radnage . . . . Daniel Wingrave vice William Mountagu.

Liberty of Temple

Wycomb . . Luke Evans vice John Sharpe.

Stoke hundred—

The Guildables of Thomas Andrews vice Thomas Eton  Woodward.

Fulmer . . . . John Allen vice Thomas Biggs.

Hugeley . . . . Daniel Baldwin vice William Blinks.

Horton . . . . William Phillips and Daniel Brads vice Joseph Devonshire and Thomas Hampton.

Waxham . . Philip Mitchell vice [Thomas Knowlton].

Orders.

p. 323.  Further reference of the appeal of Iver against the assessment of the parish to the King’s Bench and Marshalsea money.  [See p. 361.]

p. 324.  Order extending the recognizances of Mr. Richard Gosnold, Francis Thomson of Iver, labourer, Joseph Lane of Woborne, bargeman, Sarah, wife of Thomas Tayler of Wingrave, husbandman, and William Sheene junior of Aylesbury, labourer.

Charles Fleetwood and John Wilks to continue in custody until the next session.

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p. 325.  Henry Hebberd and Edward Ward committed to the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb, for “contriveing and abbetting a Burglary.”

Postponement of the imposition of the fine upon Elisha Clark of Adstock for non-attendance on a jury.

Mary Buncher of Newport Pagnell, spinster, committed to the bridewell at Newport Pagnell “for her lewdness which she has owned herself guilty of in this Court.”

Richard Masson to remain in custody until further order.

p. 326.  The inhabitants of Wyrardsbury appealed against a warrant removing John Carter, with his wife and child, from Wooburne, and the appeal was dismissed so far as Carter himself was concerned.  But as it appeared that the wife referred to in the warrant was not his legal wife, for Carter’s wife was still alive and living at Canterbury, the part of the warrant which referred to the wife and child was cancelled.

The surveyors of Long Crendon authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

p. 327.  Enrolment of the writ of ad quod damnum, and the inquisition thereon, relating to the enclosure by Sir Roger Hill, Knt., of part of the highway from Denham to Chalfont St. Peters which starts at the smith’s shop in Chalfont Lane, near Red Hill.  Alternative accommodation had been provided.  The writ was signed “Richardson” and endorsed by Sir Thomas Trevor, Knt., Attorney-General.  The in- quisition was held at Denham before Richard Whitchurch, esquire, the sheriff, with the following jurors: Henry Gould, esquire, Thomas Carter, gentleman, John Jennett, John Gaylor, Thomas Hill, John Grimsdale senior, Swithin Butterfield, Thomas Tredway, John Newman, Tobias Gut- teridge, Richard Grimsdale, Timothy Wingfield, gentleman, and Robert Hill.  It was held that the proposed diversion was not to the damage of the King or others.

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p. 328.  Order referring to certain justices the appeal of the inhabitants of Edlesborough against a recent order to pay an allowance to John Daffees.  [See p. 177.]

p. 329.  Anthony Bourchier of Newport Pagnell, gentleman, to be bound over to appear and answer for illegally dismissing his apprentice, John, son of John Stolton of North Crawley, labourer.

Order discharging the indictment against Mr. Henry Stanbridge for non-repair of a highway on his producing a certificate that the work has now been done.  [See. p. 225.]

p. 330.  Adjournment of the appeal of Stoken Church, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Edward Jigger from Great Missenden.

p. 331.  Order dismissing the adjourned appeal of Cublington against a warrant removing John Webb from Wing.

p. 332.  Order allowing the appeal of Goldington, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing John Round from Bow Brickhill.

As the decision in the case against the inhabitants of Cuddington for not repairing a certain highway [see p. 255] appeared to depend upon whether the road in question actually lay in this parish or in Dinton, one of the jurors was withdrawn and six of the remaining jurors were selected to meet at The Horseshoe in Dinton on the 22nd May to view the road and to report to the next session.

p. 333.  Reference of the dispute between Lathbury and Newport Pagnell to certain justices.  [See pp. 356-358.]

Adjournment of the appeal of Laighton Bussard, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Giles Duncomb, with his wife and three children, from Soulbury.  [See p. 359.]

p. 334.  Adjournment of the case against Princes Risborough for non-repair of a highway.

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Order dismissing the appeal of Heath and Reach, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Richard Juyons from Abbotts Aston.

pp. 335-336.  The same rates fixed for Servants’ wages as at the last Easter session.  [See pp. 202-203].

p. 337.  Usual order as to the rates for carriage of goods by land.  [See Vol. 4, p. 369].

Order fixing the price of salt at 6s. 2d. a bushel.  [See p. 206.]

p. 338.  Order allowing the appeal of Chackmore in Ratcliff against a warrant, issued by Hugh Arnett, gentleman, and John Rogers, esquire, justices of the borough of Buckingham, removing Levi King, with his wife and family, from Buck- ingham.

Richard Masson to be discharged from gaol upon finding sureties for his appearance.

Daniel Anderson, one of the churchwardens of Amersham, ordered to return the rate book to the overseers or be committed for contempt.

p. 339.  Mr. John Scott, the tenant of Crislowe, appealed against a warrant which purported to remove Elizabeth Coalman from Whitchurch.  He contended that the warrant could not be applied to Crislowe, which was not a parish, and had no officers and no inhabitants other than himself and his family.  The appeal was adjourned.

The inhabitants of Chesham complained “that divers Scotch Soldiers lately disbanded under Umbrage of the late Act of Parliament [10 and 11 William III, c. 11] that provides liberty for disbanded Soldiers exercising of Trades in Markett townes have come into their said parish with their families to settle accordingly and are likely to become chargeable thereunto.”  The examination of this complaint was referred to the justices for the hundreds of Chiltern.

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William Horwood, Thomas Martins, Richard East, and William Carter, poor debtors in the gaol, “admitted to the Countie bread.”

p. 340.  Mary, widow of William Hobbs of Chepping Wycomb, to be paid 10s., being the last quarter’s payment of her late husband’s pension.

Mary Pratt, widow, to be paid £32. 6s. 3d. for baking the County bread.

Edward Billington of Cublington admitted to a County pension of £2 a year.  He produced a certificate to show that “about eight years since he was Impressed into his Majesties service under the Command of Captain Berry in the Regiment of foot Commanded by the honorable Colonel Colethrop, in which service he continued untill the taking of the Castle of Namur in Flanders, in the Attacking whereof he received such wounds as wholly made him uncapable of continuing in the said Service.”

p. 341.  Ralph French of Fenny Stratford in Simpson, bricklayer, to be paid £1 in view of the fact that he had “for some years last past made it his Endeavour to discover, apprehend, and bring to Condign punishment divers house breakers, Robbers upon the Highway, Horse Stealers, and other Felons resorting to and lurking in severall parts of this Country, for which public services he hath hitherto received no Reward.”

Mr. Francis Woodcock, the gaoler, to be allowed £9. 6s. for his “extraordinary charges” in having to keep a “constant watch” in the gaol for the last three months.

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 14s. 8d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for thirteen weeks.

p. 342.  Mary Hargett to be allowed 2s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Chesham.

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The clerk of the peace reported that he had looked up the records concerning High Bridge at Uxbridge [see p. 303], and had found one order in the Easter Session, 1670, under which Mr. Francis Wethered was to pay Sir George Tash, Knt., and Richard Winwood, esquire, two of the justices, “so much money as they should think needfull for the repairing so much of the said Bridge as is within this County,”  and another order in the following Easter under which Mr. Wethered was to pay the same justices “all such money as was then remaining in his hands,” which Mr. Thomas Freer, the “then Receiver generall,” was to pay the justices £30. It was also reported to the Court that the surveyors of Denham had recently spent £5. 5s. 5d. on repairs to the bridge, which they ask to be repaid to them.  The whole matter was referred to the decision of certain justices. [See. p. 359.]

p. 343.  “The Justices of the Peace of the Vale and Chiltern parts of this County” were ordered to “consider whether the wages appointed this present Sessions ought to be from henceforth continued or if they see cause to make any alteration therein.”

p. 344.  Order that the record of the rating appeal of Mr. John Wigson of Aylesbury should be filed with the records of the Court.  The justices for the hundred of Aylesbury decided that he “should be rated but 2d. a Collection, being after the rate of £5 per annum.”

Memorandum that the royal proclamation “for punishing Immorality and Prophaness” was read in Court.

p. 345.  Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Daniel Anderson [see p. 316], Thomas Pratt, William Brookes, and John Cunningham [see p. 283], and the acquittals of William Sparkes and Anthony Goodman [see p. 283], and Thomas Millward [see p. 225].

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p. 346. Recognizances extended.

Richard Gosnold, given above on p. 276.

Francis Thompson of Iver, labourer, in £10, with Richard Langley, tailor, and Thomas Graves, victualler, both of Iver, as sureties in £5 each, to keep the peace towards Richard Shawe.

Joseph Lane of Woborne, bargeman, in £10, with Thomas Dean of the same, husbandman, and Joseph Dell of Great Marlow, carpenter, as sureties in £5 each, for his good behaviour.

Thomas Tayler of Wingrave, farmer, for Sarah, his wife, to answer the constables.

William Sheene junior of Aylesbury, labourer, in £20, with Thomas Sheene of the same, inn-holder, and William Sheene of Beirton, yeoman, as sureties in £10 each, to answer in respect of the bastard child of Ann Clarke.  (Sess. R. 1/35.)

Recognizances entered into.

Richard Mason of Amersham, labourer, in two recogniz- ances of £40 each, to appear and answer.

p. 347. Fines and issues.

John Parker and John White, both of Marsh Gibbon, Daniel How of Hardwick, and William West and William Hearne, both of Long Crendon, fined £1. 10s. each for non- attendance on juries.

The inhabitants of Princes Risborough, Newport Pagnell, and Buckingham fined 13s. 4d. each for not appearing to answer indictments, but the imposition of the fines was respited.

The fines of those convicted on p. 345.

pp. 348-349. Recognizances discharged.

Joseph Hunt, John Winkfield, and Daniel Anderson, yeomen, Dudley Pennard and William Hobbs, all of Amer- sham, Robert Fellow, blacksmith, Richard Fellow, draper, and Christopher Geary, gentleman, all of Chesham, John Ewer, farmer, Henry Norwood, yeoman, and Nicholas Kible, farmer, all of Agmondisham, alias Amersham, Robert 

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 EASTER SESSION, 1700

Bennett of Chalfont St. Peter, grocer, Nicholas Allen, carpenter, and Daniel Ward and William Lane, labourers, all of Princes Risborow, Thomas Hobbs of Whitchurch, yeoman, Thomas Rowell, victualler, and William King, carpenter, both of Nash in Whadden, Alice East, widow, Benjamin Saunders, baker, Charles Coates, joiner, Richard Nash and Jane, his wife, all of Woodrow in Amersham, Richard Annett of Penn, yeoman, John Bolton of Chepping Wycomb, labourer, Thomas Ansted of Woborne, labourer, William Sparkes of Chepping Wycomb Forrens, yeoman, Anthony Goodman of Woofton, wheelwright, Thomas Mill- ward of East Cleydon, yeoman, John Cooper of Newport Pagnell, plumber, and Francis Goodwin of Lavendon, stone mason.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 350.  [Blank.]

 

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT AYLESBURY

18th July, 1700 [12 William III]

p. 351. Jurors for the body of the county.

Joseph Brasbridge, gentleman, John Welch, Alexander Dover, John Dennis, Richard Wade, John Newman, Thomas Berrill, William Attenbury, Thomas Ingram, Richard Waddupp, Thomas Bunce, William Paine, James Turney junior, Thomas Eames, William Wyatt, William Walter, and John Aldridge.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

p. 352.  The Rev. Abraham Campion, rector of Monks Risborow, produced a sacrament certificate, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association.”

The houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses: Richard Putnam and John Ware, both of 

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Chesham, Jeremiah Brown, wheelwright, and Joseph White, both of Stoney Stratford, Henry Botford of Pightlestone, Edward Hore, [Blank] Dancer, widow, and Stephen Hawes, all of Princes Risborow.

p. 353. Indictments.

Abraham Glover of Burnham, tailor, for being a common disturber of the peace.  [Fined 3s. 4d.] (Sess. R. 1/1.)

Thomas Near, yeoman, overseer of Ivinghoe, for being negligent in his office.  William Culverton senior and John Toms prosecuted.  [See p. 368.] (Sess. R. 1/2.)

Richard Dale of Great Horwood, yeoman, for assaulting Emma, wife of Tris Jenkins.  (Sess. R. 1/3.)

The same Richard Dale and William Alderman, labourer, for forcible entry into the land of Tris Jenkins.  (Sess. R. 1/4.)

Information.

John Edmunds of Aylesbury, baker, for forestalling the market by selling wheat to George Thorpe of Weedon in Hardwick, yeoman.  Information was given by Richard Kempster, Thomas Osborn, and Alice Holloway.  (Sess. R. 1/5.)

p. 354. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse, Martha [Ann] Howse, Sir Edward Longvield, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy. [See note on page 71.]

George Hayes of Wendover “for entertaining one Coark for sheep stealing.”

John Hatch of Little Brickhill, shopkeeper, for keeping false weights.

John Stanley and Robert Hawkins, constables of Denham, for not presenting their offences, and for not paying their quarterly money to Richard Finch, the chief constable.

Nathaniel Carter, William Pitcher, and William Toovey, all of Ipstone in Turvile, for not helping in the repair of the highways.

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 MIDSUMMER SESSION, 1700

p. 355. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Bledlow Town . . John Chitch vice Robert Dossett.

Bledlow Ridge . . Thomas Chitch vice William Butler.

Stoke Mandivile . . John Hore and John Brill vice Thomas Ford and Joseph White.

Newport hundred—

Astwood . . . . John Cox vice Thomas Harris.

Ashenden hundred—

Westcott in Waddesden   Francis Tayler junior vice John  Hobgood.

Ludgershall . . Richard Sherley vice William Burborrough.

Desborow hundred—

Little Marlow . . Thomas Harding vice [Blank], deceased.

Burnham hundred—

Beconsfield . . John Harding as tithingman vice Thomas Grove.

Burnham Town . . Edward Bayly vice John Goulding, and William Rolles as tithingman vice John Wiggins.

Chesham . . . . Thomas Gates vice Thomas Coalman, deceased.

Orders,

pp. 356-358.  The justices for the hundred of Newport presented their report upon the complaint of Lathbury concerning the conveyance of “cripples” from Newport Pagnell.  Evidence on behalf of the latter parish was given by Anthony Lightman, William Kendall, alias Mills, and William Smith.  Lightman stated that, for the last thirty-five years, it had been customary for “cripples and other persons with passes” to be conveyed “by Cart when they could pass the Foard at Sherrington bridge and at other times on horseback and otherwise from Sherrington to Newport over Sherrington bridge into part of a Lane called Sherrington Lane in the parish of Lathbury and then through the grounds called the Squires and so to Lathbury and from thence to Newport.  And that the nearest way from Sherrington to 

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Newport is through the wholl Sherrington Lane (which is the direct high road) and not by Lathbury Town.  But that he never knew Cripples or any other persons with passes Conveyed that way.”  The other two witnesses gave evidence to the same effect.  No evidence was produced by Lathbury. The Court ordered that in future all “Cripples” and others on passes, whether in carts or on horseback or on foot, should be conveyed to and from Newport Pagnell “by the next Straight and most direct ways.”

p. 359.  The justices, who were ordered to investigate the question of the payment for repairs to “the Great bridge at Uxbridge Townes end called High bridge,” reported that “the antient usage hath all along bene for this County out of the County Stock to repair the said bridge.”  The surveyors of Denham were, therefore, ordered to be repaid the sum of £5. 5s. 5d. which they had spent on necessary repairs. [See p. 342.]

Order dismissing the appeal of Laighton Bussard, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Giles Duncombe, Margaret, his wife, and Elizabeth, Mary, and Sarah, their daughters, from Soulbury.

p. 360.  John Rose, Matthew Annesley, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

Mary Buncher to be discharged from the bridewell at Newport Pagnell.

p. 361.  The Court confirmed the report of the justices who were appointed to consider the appeal of the parish of Iver against their assessment to the King's Bench and Marshalsea money and to the money for the maimed soldiers.  The report stated that the parish had been assessed at £l. 7s. 10d. a quarter for the last twenty years, but it did not appear “how upon what Account or at whose instance the said parish was so highly charged, but we presume it happened through inadvertency of the Limittation of the Statutes that direct the said Taxation.”  The six parishes in the half 

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hundred of Stoke were assessed as follows for each quarter: Iver, £1. 7s. 10d.; Langley, 14s. 4d.; Denham, 13s. 6d.; Fulmer, 3s. 3d.; Wexham, 2s. 10d.; Hedgerly, 2s. 10½d. It was ordered that Iver should in future be assessed at 1s. 4d. a week, which would amount to 17s. 4d. a quarter. [See p. 291.]

p. 362.  The order of reference of the appeal of Mary Stannanett was revived, as, after the justices to whom the matter was referred had given their decision, the money ordered to be paid was devoted to another purpose.  [See p. 168].

Order dismissing the appeal of Newport Pagnell against a warrant removing John Pound from Bow Brickhill.

p. 363.  Adjournment of the appeal of Buckingham against a warrant removing Richard Rogers from Stowe.

Order allowing the appeal of Milton Bryant, co. Bedford, against a warrant removing Edward White, with his wife and child, from Stewkley.

p. 364.  Charles Fleetwood, John Wilks, Henry Hebberd, and Edward Ward to be discharged from gaol upon finding sureties.

Order allowing the appeal of Newton Longvile against a warrant removing William, Zachariah, Mary, and Elizabeth, the children of the late Zachariah Tompkins, from Ivingho.

p. 365.  Order discharging the indictment against the in- habitants of Prince Risborough for non-repair of a highway, upon their producing a justices’ certificate that the work had been done.  [See p. 284.]

The surveyors of Prince Risborough, Walton in Ayles- bury, Wendover Forrens, and Weston Turvile, authorized to raise 6d. rates for the repair of their highways.

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p. 366.  Order allowing the appeal of Waddesden against a warrant removing William Brookes, with his wife and children, from Monks Risborough.  It was shewn in evidence that, since the making of the order, Brookes had taken the lease of some property in Aston Clinton, of a value exceeding £10 a year, from Samuel Partridge.

p. 367.  Order allowing the appeal of Shenley against a warrant removing John Smeley, carpenter, and his sons, Henry and William, from Loughton, where he had been living for the last twelve years, and had recently married the widow of [Blank] Sibthorp.

p. 368.  The inhabitants of Hanslop asked for the advice of the Court in the following circumstances.  They complained that the overseers of Kislingbury, co. Northampton, had put three poor children as apprentices with a certain John Parker, a poor inhabitant of Hanslop, who “for the Lucre of Gain hath Entertained them and undertaken their education.”  The Court advised the inhabitants of Hanslop to apply for an order for removal in the usual way.

As Thomas Near, Richard Sawell, and Bernard Hopkins had accepted the apprentices bound to them by the overseers of Ivingho, the penalty imposed on them by the act of 43 Elizabeth, c. 2, was removed.

p. 369.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Jane Smith and her child from Buckingham to Dunstable, co. Bedford.

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of William Kingham from Marsh Gibbon to Bletchington, co. Oxford.

p. 370.  Order extending the recognizance of Richard Gutteridge.

Further adjournment of the appeal of Stoken Church, co. Oxford, pending the opinion of the Judges of Assize.

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The cases against the mayor of Chepping Wycomb and the bailiff of Buckingham were adjourned sine die.  [See p. 317.]

p. 371.  William Sheene of Wendover to remain in gaol until he found sureties in respect of the bastard child of Ann Clarke.  (Sess. R. 1/35.)

Certain justices appointed to obtain the opinion of the Judges of Assize in the cases against the constables of Aylesbury, Winslow, Chesham, and Amersham, who were presented for “suffering Bushells to be used in their respective Marketts for measuring of Corn which do not agree with the Standard of his Majesties Exchequer.”  The constables protested that “onely the Lord or Owner of the Markett or Franchise ought to have been presented.”  [See pp. 317 and 408.]

Jonas Porter of Toddington, co. Bedford, keeper, to be discharged from gaol upon finding sureties.

p. 372.  Order allowing the appeal of Wingrave against a warrant removing Thomas Wigge from Cublington.

Confirmation of a warrant removing John Banland from Waddesden to Uxbridge, co. Middlesex.

p. 373.  Thomas Fisher senior of Whaddon, who was committed to the bridewell at Aylesbury on suspicion of having stolen some sheep from Richard Philips, was committed to the gaol until he appeared at the Assizes.

p. 374.  Order that the estate of John Green of Winslow, surgeon, who was adjudged to be the father of the bastard child of Catherine Green of Winslow, widow, but had “run away,” should be charged with the payment of 2s. a week to the overseers of the parish.  Joseph Turner of Winslow, surgeon, held a lease of Green’s property and appealed against the order to pay part of his rent direct to the overseers, and his appeal was adjourned.  [See p. 404.] 

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The treasurers whose accounts had not yet been audited were ordered to attend at the house of Mr. Saunders in Chepping Wycomb, “known by the Sign of the Antelop,” on the 13th August.

p. 375.  The price of salt fixed at 6s. 2d. a bushel.

Certain justices appointed to hear the dispute between the inhabitants of Little Horwood and William Barton.

p. 376.  The inhabitants of Padbury discharged from the indictment against them for non-repair of a highway, upon producing a justices’ certificate that the work had been done.  [See p. 316.]

Nicholas Aries of Water Stratford, labourer, similarly discharged.  [See p. 317.]

p. 377.  The inhabitants of Chackmore in Ratcliffe similarly discharged in respect of part of the road to Tingwick near Conduit Ground.  [See p. 255.]

Adjournment of the case against Winslow for non- repair of a highway.

p. 378.  Order that the recognizances of Richard Masson should be estreated unless he gave notice of his appearance to his prosecutors, John Tanner and Thomas Horwood, within a fortnight.  Masson had failed to appear to answer two indictments.  [See p. 316.]

p. 379.  Certain justices appointed to audit the account of Mr. Thomas Williams of Aylesbury, apothecary, for £3. 6s. for medicines supplied to the gaol.

The justices for the hundreds of Ashenden were ordered to view Ickford Bridge, which lies between the counties of Buckingham and Oxford, and to see what repairs would be necessary.  The cost of the repair would be met out of the County funds.

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p. 380.  William Miller and John Harris, poor debtors in the gaol, admitted to “the Allowance of the County bread.”

The complaints of Deborah Weaver, Elizabeth Meadlow, Thomas Bigg, and other poor persons of Aylesbury, that the overseers of Aylesbury had recently reduced their allowances, were referred to certain justices.

p. 381.  William Benson, the late gaoler, to be paid £20 on account of rent claimed by him for the goal.  The remaining £40 would be paid when funds were available after the auditing of the treasurers’ accounts.

p. 382.  The complaints of Mary Hargett of Wingrave, Hannah Fisher of Whaddon, Mary Franklyn of Great Horwood, and Elizabeth Power of Winslow, that the over- seers had reduced their allowances, were referred to certain justices.

p. 383.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for main- taining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks and £2 for clothing.

p. 384.  The allowance for “the County bread” was reduced from 3d. for each prisoner in the gaol to 2½d., in view of the fact that “the Price of Corne is of late much abated.”  It was further ordered that the bread should in future be supplied, for a week at a time, by the following bakers: Mary Pratt senior, widow, Mary Pratt junior, widow, and William Chandler, all of Aylesbury.

Mary Pratt senior, widow, to be paid her bill of £33. 14s. 6d. for baking the County bread.

p. 385.  John Bigg, gentleman, the deputy-sheriff, to be paid £20 in advance for his expenses during the coming year.

Memorandum that the Royal Proclamation concerning 

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the punishment of “Immorality and Prophaness” was read in open Court.

p. 386. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of William Eldridge [see p. 253], Lawrence Oxley [see p. 316], Richard Miles, Richard Marriot, Edward Ewstace, and Daniel Norris [see p. 317], and Abraham Glover [see p. 353.]

p. 387. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: Richard Gosnold (p. 276), William Sheene and Richard Mason (p. 346).

John Smith of Chesham, labourer, in £10, with Daniel Sweetser and Robert Reynolds, both of Chesham, labourers, as sureties in £5 each, for his good behaviour.  The two sureties were themselves similarly bound over, with the other two in each case going bail.

John Goodwin of Chesham, labourer, bound over with the same sureties for his good behaviour.

William Coney of Chesham, butcher, in £10, with William Almond and John Pratt, both of Chesham, labourers, as sureties in £5 each, for his good behaviour.

Richard Gutteridge of Great Missenden, labourer, in £40, with Edward Hoare, clothier, and George Hickman, cheesemonger, both of the same, as sureties in £20 each, to answer for felony.

Isaac Beddall of Princes Risborow, silk-weaver, in £40, with William Redding, yeoman, and William, son of the late Joseph Dossett, both of the same, as sureties in £20 each, to keep the peace towards Faith Aldridge.

Christopher Geary of Chesham, gentleman, in £40, and Joseph Gate of Weedon Hill in Chesham, labourer, in £10 to give evidence against William Coney, John Penny, Nathaniel Edwards, and William Lawrence.

Robert Cordwell of Chesham in [blank] to prosecute John Smith and others.

p. 388. Recognizance entered into.

Jonas Porter of Toddington, co. Bedford, keeper, in 

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£40, with William Walters of the same, grazier, and Henry Smith of Stewkley, dairyman, as sureties in £20 each, to appear and answer.

p. 389. Fines and issues.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 386.

The inhabitants of Newport Pagnell, Winslow, and Buckingham, fined £2 each for not appearing to answer indictments.  [And see Vol. 6, p. 38.]

pp. 390-391. Recognizances discharged.

Francis Thompson, labourer, Richard Langley, tailor, and Thomas Graves, victualler, all of Iver, Joseph Lane, bargeman, and Thomas Dean, husbandman, both of Woborne, Joseph Dell of Great Marlow, carpenter, Thomas Taylor of Wingrave, farmer, and Sarah, his wife, Peter Rivers of Chepping Wycomb, cordwainer, John Rivers of Great Marlow, innholder, John Goulding of Burnham, husband- man, John Johnson, bailiff, Thomas Dolby, labourer, and John Buncher, labourer, all of Newport Pagnell, John Penny, William Almond, John Pratt, and William Coney, labourers, and Nathaniel Edwards and William Lawrence, husbandmen, all of Chesham, Giles Dix of Olney, victualler, John Attkins, tailor, and Ralph Edoes, clerk, both of Little Missenden, Joseph Attkins, tailor, and Jonathan Dagg, clerk, both of Great Missenden, William Lawrence, miller, Joseph Gate and William Seabrooke, yeoman, and John Dolley, alias Dalley, all of Chesham, Abraham Glover, tailor, James Price, labourer, and John Butler, labourer, all of Burnham, Richard Crawley, tailor, and Henry King and William Webb, dairy- men, all of Middle Claydon, Thomas Walters of Mursley, victualler, Jonas Porter, keeper, and William Walters, grazier, both of Toddington, co. Bedford, Joseph Foskett of Lavendon, farmer, Charles Dean, butcher, and John Sharp, collar-maker, both of Great Missenden.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 392.  [Blank.]

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MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT BUCKINGHAM

10th October, 1700 [12 William III]

p. 393. Jurors for the body of the county.

Gustave Horne, Thomas Horwood, Edward Martin, William Golder, William Reynolds, Joseph Cox, Robert Manwareing, Richard Titt, William Gomm, Thomas Dudley, Thomas Butcher, James Harding, John Child, John Emerton, John Cooke, Daniel Walker and Thomas Blake.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the case against William Alday.

Richard Blackwell, Edward Stone, Lawrence Bishopp, Edward Sibthorpe, John Webster, Thomas Scott, George Carter, John Upstone, Thomas Ingram, Timothy Owen, William Mead, and Ralph Collett.

(signed) Richard Whitchurch, esquire, sheriff.

p. 394.  Ferdinand Shrimpton, gentleman, mayor of Chepping Wycomb, produced a sacrament certificate, took the statutory oaths, and subscribed the “Association,” and John Partridge of Aspley Guyes, co. Bedford, wheel- wright, took the oaths as a Dissenter.

p. 395.  The house of William Moreton, gentleman, at Knaphill in Hugenden, and “the Barn of John Carter and others, feoffees in Trust, purchased of John Foster and others in Olney,” were registered as meeting houses.

p. 396. Convictions of swearers.

Joseph Sumner of Dinton, William Brooks of Aylesbury, Mary Broxon of Cublington, and John Anderson of Long Crendon, fined 10s. each for five oaths.

Thomas Rowell of Nash fined 8s. for four oaths.

John Harris of Winslow fined 4s. for two oaths.

Robert Dossett, labourer, John Clarke, Thomas Shepherd, and Richard Lovett, all of Wendover, Thomas Stephens, John Chapman, labourer, Charles Deane, William Aldridge, 

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and Thomas Eaton, all of Great Missenden, Isaac Ray, smith, and Gabriel White, both of Aylesbury, Henry Stevens of Amersham, Richard Jone, John Wood, and Humphrey Peters, all of Chesham, William Neighbour of Weston Turvile, Obadiah Child of Berkampsted St. Peters, co. Hertford, Henry Boneham and John Leech, both of Haversham, fined 2s. each for one oath.

The above John Clarke was fined 4s. for a second offence.

John Stephens of Princes Risborow, cordwainer, Isaac Ray, smith, and Gabriel White, both of Aylesbury, fined 2s. each for one “prophane curse.”

pp. 397-398. Indictments.

Robert West and Charles Davis, both of Aylesbury, labourers, for molesting and assaulting William Phillipps and John Holderness, constables of Colebrook.  [Fined 3s. 4d. each.]  (Sess. R. 3/87.)

William Alday of Edgcott, labourer, for stealing eleven quarts of milk from Thomas Watson.  Richard Dale and Philip Whitfield prosecuted.  [To be whipped; see p. 405.] (Sess. R. 3/88.)

Nathaniel Carter, William Pitcher, and William Tovey, all of Ibstone in Turvile, yeomen, for refusing to send teams for the repair of the highways.  (Sess. R. 3/89, 3/91, 3/97.)

John Stanley and Robert Hawkins, labourers, constables of Denham, for not bringing in their presentments or their quarterly money.  (Sess. R. 3/90, 3/96.)

Samuel Shrimpton, farmer, and Richard Bownes, both of Cuddington, for assaulting Edmund Hack, and for stealing twelve pounds of black cherries from John Hawkes.  [Shrimpton fined £1, and Bownes 13s. 4d., for each offence.]  (Sess. R. 3/92, 3/93.)

Henry Martin of Edlesborow for breaking into the close of John Russell and spoiling four ranges of pales.  [Fined £l. 6s. 8d.] (Sess. R. 3/94.)

George Hayes of Wendover, labourer, for harbouring and assisting [Blank] Coark, knowing him to be a felon.  (Sess. R. 3/95.)

John Tipper, gentleman, and Mary, his wife, John Mawby, labourer, and Ann, his wife, Frances Carter, widow, 

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and Dorothy, wife of Thomas Walters, all of Salden in Mursley, for absence from church for three weeks.  (Sess. R. 3/76.)

p. 399. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes, Martha [Ann] Howes, Finch Howes and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longvield, John Tipper, and Mary, his wife, John Mawby, and Ann, his wife, Frances Carter, Dorothy Walters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinkhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

[Blank] Fellowes of Wendover Forrens, widow, for harbouring of vagrants.

Thomas Boorne of Bledlow for selling ale without a licence.

William Dawney of Aylesbury, innholder, for keeping a disorderly alehouse, for gaming, and for selling ale on a Sunday.

Robert Cubbidge, constable of Brill, and Edward Gomm, constable of Ilmer, for not bringing in their presentments or their quarterly money.

p. 400. Petty constables sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Wendover . . Simon Pidder and Benjamin Lake vice William Cristmas and Henry Hore.

Weston Turvile . . William Bate and Richard Moores vice Joseph Martin and William Henley.

Halton . . . . Alexander Mayne vice William Prentice.

Ashenden hundred—

Oveing . . . . Joseph Coles vice John Hancock Benning.

Cottesloe hundred—

Drayton Beauchamp . . . . John Thorneton vice John Birch.

Burnham hundred—

Chalfont St. Giles . .  Robert Hill junior and James Garratt vice Frederick Nash and Thomas Saunders.

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Penn . . . . John Child vice John Fryer.

Orders.

p. 401.  Order estreating the recognizances of Richard Masson on account of his non-appearance.

John Hollis to be discharged from the bridewell at Chepping Wycombe.

“It appearing to this Court this present Sessions by the Kalenders of the Prisoners in the houses of Correction that Felons for Petty Larceny, through some Inadvertencies, happen sometimes to be committed to those houses, which the Law never intended, for preventing whereof for the future it is ordered . . . that all such Committments are irregular and that all felons and persons suspected of felony ought to be committed to the County Goal.”

Order discharging the indictments against William Haill and John Densey, for trading without due apprenticeship, as it appeared to the Court that the indictments were “vexatious and not within the intent of the Statute . . . of 5 Elizabeth, Cap. 4.”  [See p. 210, etc.]

p. 402.  Order confirming a warrant removing William Brooks, with his wife and family, from Monks Risborough to Aston Clinton.

The inhabitants of Wendover asked for the advice of the Court in the following circumstances.  They complained that John Passe, “a Scotch Pedlar,” and his wife had been taking apprentices so that the number of their household had increased to eight persons.  Passe had recently deserted his family and had made over all his property to a certan Mr. Errick, so that the maintenance of his household was falling upon the parish of Wendover.  The whole matter was referred to certain justices.

p. 403.  John Rose, Matthew Annesley, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

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Order dismissing the appeal of Parsenham, co. North- ampton, against a warrant removing John Hawkes from Stony Stratford.  It was proved that Hawkes was a bastard child who was born at the house of George Tossell in Old Stratford in the parish of Dunsanger in Parsenham.

p. 404.  Order allowing the appeal of Dourton against a warrant removing John Bates, labourer, from Wotton Underwood.

As Joseph Turner did not appear to support his appeal against an order of the last session, his appeal was dismissed and he was ordered to pay his rent direct to the overseers of Winslow.  [See p. 374.]

p. 405.  Order referring to certain justices the complaint of Henry Bedford that he was not paid a sufficient allowance by the overseers of Edlesborough.

Similar order in the case of Samuel Tompkins of Slapton.

William Alday, convicted of larceny, to be whipped at the cart’s tail from the gaol door to the Town Hall at Buckingham and back again.  [See pp. 397 and 449.]

p. 406.  Orders extending the recognizances of the persons given on p. 417.

The petty constable of Little Brickhill to be paid £11. 10s. 8d. for expenses “in the conveying of Cripples and travelling persons.”

p. 407.  At the last Assizes the grand jury made a presentment “that the Common Goal in Aylesbury was the Freehold Inheritance of Mr. Benson, and that the same is too weak and not large enough.”  The Court considered this presentment and came to the following conclusions.  First, that the gaol should be continued at Aylesbury “and att no other place whatsoever.”  Second, that certain justices should meet at the George Inn at Aylesbury on the 19th December to 

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consider how much money “must necessarily be raysed for the purposes herein mentioned and what workmen of all Trades concerned therein are in their judgment most fit respectively to be imployed about the same, and whether it may best conduce to the Public advantage and benefit of this County to purchase new ground whereupon to Erect such Goal or to continue the same in Mr. Benson’s house.”  The bailiffs of the various hundreds were ordered to attend this meeting, and the justices were to report to the Court when they had finished their deliberations.  [See pp. 430-432.]

p. 408.  The justices, who were to obtain the opinion of the Judges of Assize upon the question as to whether the constables of market towns could be presented for permitting illegal bushels to be used in their markets, reported that they had been informed by Sir John Holt, Knt., the Lord Chief Justice, that the cases were “not particuler enough” for his judgment but that he advised the Court to try the cases and to allow the defendants to appeal to the King’s Bench by writ of certiorari.  It was, therefore, ordered that the defendants should obtain writs of certiorari.  [See pp. 317 and 371.]

p. 409.  Certain justices appointed to hear the complaint of Mary Bates that Thomas Carter, overseer of Marsworth, had refused to pay her an allowance of 10s. a month, which had been duly allowed at a Vestry, alleging that her son Joseph had recently purchased a mill in the parish and was able to maintain her.  She denied this statement and said that she would certainly have perished without the aid of John Norwood, her son-in-law.

p. 410.  Order referring to certain justices the appeal of the overseers of West Wycombe that an order to increase the allowance of Nathaniel Fryer to 2s. a week should now be discharged.  [See p. 14.]

Order remitting the fine imposed on George Cheshire of Oveing, for non-attendance on a jury, on account of urgent business.

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p. 411.  Samuel Shrimpton and Richard Bownes permitted to withdraw their pleas of not guilty and to plead guilty to the indictments against them.  [See pp. 397-398.]

 

Order estreating the recognizances of the inhabitants of Newport Pagnell for non-appearance to answer several indictments.

 

Orders postponing the case against the inhabitants of Winslow, and discharging that against the inhabitants of Buckingham, for non-repair of highways.

 

p. 412.  The allowance for the County bread reduced to 2d. a day.

 

Order that “from henceforth the respective Treasurers of the Maymed Soldiers do pay all moneys charged by this Court uppon the County Stock and all Pensions in their respective divisions.”

 

p. 413.  The following to be paid for baking the County bread: Mary Pratt senior £8. 3s. 5½d., Mary Pratt junior £7. 2s. 1½d., and William Chandler £6. 16s. 1½d.

 

p. 414.  William Bayley and John Clarke, poor debtors in the gaol, to be admitted to an allowance of the County bread.

 

John Rose, bridewell-keeper at Chepping Wycombe, to be paid £3 for conveying felons “to justice.”

 

Samuel Tompkins to remain in gaol until he found sureties.

 

Mr. Francis Woodcock, the gaoler, to be paid £7 for conveying prisoners to the Assizes at Chepping Wycombe.

 

Mr. Benson’s appeal concerning the rent for the gaol to be referred to the justices who were considering the question of the new gaol.

 

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p. 415.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 12s. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for twelve weeks.

 

Further reference of the question of the repairs to Ickford Bridge.

 

Mr. John Bigg, the under-sheriff, to be paid £10, and the clerk of the peace £4. 12s. 6d, for work undertaken for the County.

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Kislingbury, co. North- ampton, against a warrant removing Ann, Elizabeth, and Patience Harris from Hanslop.

 

p. 416. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of William Alday, Robert West, Charles Davis, Samuel Shrimpton, and Richard Bownes.  [See pp. 397-398.]

 

p. 417. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above:  William Sheeney (p. 346), John Smith, Daniel Sweetser, Robert Reynolds, John Goodwin, William Coney, Christopher Geary, and Joseph Gate (p. 387).

Abraham Frye of Maydenhead, co. Berks, in £10, with Robert Forth of Taplow, farmer, and Joseph Darvall of Cookham, co. Berks, miller, as sureties in £5 each, for his good behaviour.

John Conningham of Sherrington, labourer, in £40, for bastardy.

Robert Skevington of Newton Blossomvile, gentleman, in £40 to keep the peace towards John Telfer.

Richard Whaley of Little Brickhill, victualler, in £20, to keep the peace towards Michael Parratt.

Samuel Shrimpton junior of Cuddington, bricklayer, and Richard Bownes of Dinton, labourer, in £20 each, with George Dolly and Thomas Barrett, both of Dinton, yeomen, as sureties in each case in £10 each, to keep the peace towards Edmund Hack.

 

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p. 418. Recognizance entered into.

Henry Martin of Edlesborow, labourer, in £40, to appear and answer.

 

p. 4I9. Fines and issues.

Christopher Sherrington of Agmondisham, Richard Talbutt of Eton, Andrew Groome of Iver, and James Harmon junior of Great Marlow, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

Richard Masson of Amersham, labourer, forfeited two recognizances of £40 on account of his non-appearance to answer two indictments.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 416.

The inhabitants of Newport Pagnell fined £2 for not appearing to answer indictments against them.

 

pp. 420-421. Recognizances discharged.

Richard Gosnold of Wooborne, gentleman, Charles Blewitt, surgeon, and John Rivers, innholder, both of Great Marlow, Richard Gutteridge, labourer, Edward Hoare, clothier, and George Hickman, cheesemonger, all of Great Missenden, Isaac Beddall, silk-weaver, William Redding, yeoman, and William, son of the late Joseph Dossett, all of Princes Risborow, Jonas Porter, keeper, and William Walters, grazier, both of Toddington, co. Bedford, Henry Smith of Stewkley, dairyman, Richard Olliff, labourer, and Francis Woodcock, gentleman, both of Aylesbury, Ralph Swinburne of Wendover, yeoman, Thomas Fellowes of Ellesborow, labourer, John Nerfoote of Wendover, labourer, Richard Stafford, and Joseph Hone, both of Burnham, wheelers, Humphrey Stafford of Bray, co. Berks., husbandman, Thomas Nevill of Taplow, farmer, Henry Messenger of Burnham, yeoman, Joseph Darvall of Cookham, co. Berks., miller, James Hall, higler, Henry West and Peter West, bakers, all of Gawcott, John Rutt, weaver, David Salter, tanner, and John Parratt, yeoman, all of Amersham, John Partridge of Aspley, Henry Martine and Anthony Cock, both of Edlesborough, farmers, William Impson, bricklayer, and George Carpenter, husbandman, both of Ivinghoe, 

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John Pennell senior and John Pennell junior, both of Akeley, butchers, Thomas Rowell of Nash, victualler, Francis Rigby of Little Horwood, farmer, John Webster, horse-courser, and Matthew Allen, yeoman, both of Brill, William Allen of Okeley, labourer, Thomas Murren and John Beesley, both of West Wycombe, paper-makers, Thomas Bayley of Aylesbury, tailor, Robert Fryday junior of Hillesdon, dairyman, Richard Dale of Singleborrow, yeoman, Thomas Watson of Edgecott, gentleman, William Philips and John Holderness, constables, of Colebrook, William Taylor of Hillesdon, yeoman, and John Hawkes of Aylesbury, tailor.

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

p. 422.  [Blank].

 

 

EPIPHANY SESSION

AT WENDOVER

16th January, 1700-01 [12 William III]

 

p. 423. Jurors for the body of the county.

John Stacey, William Collett, and Thomas Jordain, gentlemen, Joseph Bampton, William Cooke, Henry Churchill, William Bampton, David Salter, John Bovington, John Russell, James Knight, Richard Cox, Christopher Theed, George Stone, and Robert Badrick.

(signed) Richard Waddopp, esquire, sheriff.

 

Jurors for the case against Henry Martin.

Robert Burd, Thomas Towersey, Richard Towersey, Thomas Greening, Henry Webb, Joseph Rose, Henry Grainge, Robert Moreton, Thomas Fowler, Thomas Syms, Thomas Goodman, and John Sedding.

(signed) Richard Waddopp, esquire, sheriff.

 

p. 424.  Thomas Browne of Winchendon, gentleman, produced a sacrament certificate, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association.”

 

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p. 425.  The houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses: John Cook, John Richardson, Daniel Wire, James Sells, and John Turner, all of Chesham, Sarah Ginger of Wendover, spinster, Peter Franceway and George Brown, shoemaker, both of Stoney Stratford, John Toogood of Great Brickhill, Samuel Clark, gentleman, and John Anthony senior, both of Beconsfield, and Nathaniel Costard of Bledlow.

 

p. 426. Convictions of swearers.

James Wade of Prince Risborow, William Adeane of Dinton, Christopher Geary, gentleman, John Porter junior, John Peddar, John Dod, John Parrott, Henry Stevens, Thomas Benning, John Hilum, and Philip Ware, all of Chesham, Thomas Eaton and Charles Deane, both of Great Missenden, William Eldridge of Ellesborough, Joseph Newton of Wendover, Nicholas Sweby of Aston Clinton, glazier, Richard Holland of Stow, servant, Alexander Kingham, shoemaker, John Mayden, butcher, and Robert Mayden, butcher, all of Aylesbury.

 

p. 427. Indictments.

William Porter of Calverton, labourer, for taking away two hounds, value 5s. each, from William Hartley, gentleman, Robert Hatley, and John Williams.  [Fined 3s. 4d.] (Sess. R. 4/3.)

Thomas Boorne of Bledlow, victualler, for keeping an unlicensed alehouse.  John Chitch and Thomas Chitch prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 4/4.)

Sarah Fellowes of Wendover, widow, for entertaining vagabonds.  Henry Hoare and John Norcott prosecuted. (Sess. R. 45.)

Edward Gomm, labourer, constable of Ilmer, for not bringing in his presentments, and for not paying his quarterly money to William Curson, the chief constable.  (Sess. R. 4/6, 4/7.)

Henry Watkins, wheelwright, surveyor of Wendover, for extorting 8s. from Ralph Swinbourne, under colour of his office.  Jane Swinbourne, John Norcott, and Richard Goldin prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 4/8.)

 

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George Thorpe of Weedon in Hardwick, yeoman, for refusing to assist in the repair of the highways.  Alexander Duncombe prosecuted.  (Sess. R. 4/9.)

John Fowler of Edlesborough, labourer, for breaking into the close of John Russell and spoiling four ranges of pales.  [Fined 13s. 4d.] (Sess. R. 4/2.)

 

p. 428. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, Finch Howse and his wife, John Howse and his wife, Sir Edward Longvield, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.]

John Milmay, alias Mildmay, of Wendover Forrens, labourer, for assaulting Simon Pedder and Benjamin Lake, the constables.  (Discharged, Sess. R. 1/43.)

William Alday of Edgcott, victualler, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.

John Mercer, William Bishop, John Turpin, and Susan, his wife, and Elizabeth Mercer, all of Weedon in Hardwick, for assaulting John Rogers, the constable.

William Pitcher, Nathaniel Carter, and William Toovey, all of Turfield, yeomen, for not assisting in the repair of the highways although warned by Thomas Wright and John Ilbury, the surveyors.  [See Vol. 6, p. 17.] (Writ of venire facias in relation to the above persons, given in Sess. R. 1/38.)

 

Presentment by the surveyors.

John Quarringdon of Walton in Aylesbury, presented by John Jordan and John Wooster, the surveyors, for not sending teams for the repair of the highways.  [See Vol. 6, p. 12.]

 

p. 429.  Memorandum that William Cannon, John Woodbridge, John Hutchens, Henry Griffin, William Leadbury, Isaac Payne, Thomas Berry, John Clark, and Ralph Rice, the trustees of the poor of Brill by virtue of a decree issuing from the Court of Exchequer, elected William Cossens ofChersley, gentleman, as trustee, to manage the pasture 

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ground called Poor Folkes Pasture at Boarstall in place ofthe late Thomas Brightwell of Chersley.

 

Petty constables sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Buckland . . . . Richard Warner vice John Ingram.

Newport hundred—

Broughton . . . . John Fuller vice John Kent.

Bow Brickill . . Thomas Cook vice Matthew Davis.

Newport Pagnell . . Samuel Coles and William Goodman vice John Phillips and Henry Finimore.

Weston Underwood Edward Smith vice William Brice.

Ashenden hundred—

Brill . . . . William Wallis vice Robert Cubbidge.

Burnham hundred—

East Burnham . . Edward Edgson vice Richard Compton.

Liberty of Boveney Henry Tucker vice John Apelby.

Chesham Boyes . . Henry Batchelor vice Thomas Larkins.

Taplow . . . . Edward Chilbury vice Thomas Nevill.

Stoke hundred—

Denham . . . . Thomas Smith, bricklayer, and Thomas Smith, broom-seller, vice Robert Hawkins and John Stanlock.

Wyrardsbury  . . Elisha Harrison vice John Gibbons.

 

Orders.

pp. 430-432.  The justices appointed to consider the question of the County gaol presented their report, as follows.  They had held two meetings at the George Inn at Aylesbury, on the 19th and 30th December, but were unable to get a quorum for their last meeting at the King’s Head on the 9th January, owing to “the Election of Knights for this County” falling on that day.  With the aid of Mr. George Clisby, surveyor, they had come to certain conclusions: (1) that the cost of altering the present gaol would be £200, (2) the cost of rebuilding the gaol on the present site would be £500, (3) the cost of altering the King’s Head at Aylesbury, or any other such house, would be £400, and (4) the cost of

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building a new gaol on “an acre of ground more or less where there is no building now erected” would be £2,000.

They had also treated with the owners of several vacant sites and were investigating the cost of building a new gaol “according to the Moddell of Warwick Goale [or] . . . Northampton Goale.”  They had not had time to put these last points into the form of a report, and so they asked for further time for this and for further investigations, which request was granted.  [See p. 407.]

 

p. 433.  John Sprues, who was committed for stealing poultry, to be kept in custody until the next Assizes. Silvester Carter of Great Marlow was similarly to be detained on suspicion of receiving the stolen poultry.

 

Orders extending the recognizances of John Smith, Daniel Sweetser, Robert Reynolds, and John Goodwin, Mr. Christopher Geary and Mr. Harris having undertaken that they should appear at the next session.

 

p. 434.  Order that the memorandum given on p. 429 should be filed with the records of the Court.

 

The surveyors of Dinton authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

 

p. 435.  Adjournment of the appeal of Great Hasely, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Elizabeth Smith from Towersey.  [See Vol. 6, p. 14.]

 

Order dismissing the appeal of Mintowne, co. Salop, against a warrant removing Richard Betterton, with his wife and three children, from Stoney Stratford West Side.

 

p. 436.  Order discharging the recognizance of Thomas Pounce of Farnham Royall as he had given compensation to William Manfield for having assaulted him.  (Sess. R. 4/1.)

 

Adjournment of the appeal of North Crawley against a warrant removing Charles Sutton, Hannah, his wife, and 

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their three children, from Newport Pagnell.  [See Vol 6, p. 13.]

 

p. 437.  Order allowing the appeal of Langley Marish against a warrant removing William Green from Iver.

 

John Rose, Matthew Annesley, and Henry Munday, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

 

p. 438.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Benjamin Wilson, Joan, his wife, and their two children, from Aston Sandford to Sundbury, co. Middlesex.

 

Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Thomas Swift from Winslow to Emerton.

 

p. 439.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Thomas Emerton junior, and his wife, from Ivinghoe to Little Gadesden.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Puttenham against a warrant removing Richard Mildner and Elizabeth, his wife, from Aston Abbotts.

 

p. 440.  Order remitting the fine imposed on John Bishop of Bow Brickill for non-attendance on a jury, the Court accepting his excuse that “by violence of the Weather he was interrupted in his journey.”

 

Mr. Josias Askew, one of the treasurer’s for the maimed soldiers, ordered to pay £100 out of the funds in his hands to Mr. Christopher Payne, one of the treasurers for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea, in order to meet the deficiency arising from the heavy charge of conveying “Cripples” and vagrants.

 

Orders extending the recognizances of William Coney, Joseph Gate, John Conningham, Robert Skevington, and Richard Whaley.

 

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p. 441.  Order confirming a warrant for the removal of Mary Arsley from Burnham to New Windsor, co. Berks.

 

Adjournment of the appeal of Cheddington against a warrant removing John Turner, Mary, his wife, and their child, from Mentmore.

 

p. 442.  James Price of Burnham, miller, committed to gaol in default of finding sureties in respect of the bastard child of Eleanor Monnord, alias Manwood.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Shenley against a warrant removing John Smealy and Henry, his son, from Loughton.

 

p. 443.  Further reference of the complaint of Chesham.

 

Thomas Noar, late overseer of Ivinghoe, to be bound over to appear and answer an indictment for misappropriation of public money.

 

p. 444.  Order adjourning the case against Newport Pagnell for non-repair of highways.

 

Certain justices appointed to hear the complaint of Emma Green that the overseers of [Blank] refused to pay her a proper allowance.

 

Further reference of the case concerning the allowance to be paid to John Daffee of Edlesborough.

 

p. 445.  William Fowler of Woughton, carpenter, committed to gaol in default of finding sureties in respect of the bastard child of Ann Jefferyes of Newport Pagnell.

 

Mr. Thomas Williams of Aylesbury, apothecary, to be paid his bill of £3. 6s. 3d. for medicines supplied to prisoners in the gaol.

 

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p. 446.  Mary Pratt senior, Mary Pratt junior, and William Chandler, the bakers of the County bread, to be paid their respective bills of £6. 17s. 7d., £6. 11s. 6d., and £5. 4s. 10d.

 

p. 447.  Mary, wife of William Franklin of Great Horwood, committed to the bridewell at Newport Pagnell for a month, as it appeared that “shee is very unquiet in her Neighbourhood and hath passionatly uttered divers approbrious and threat- ning Speeches against the . . . inhabitants [of Great Horwood], whereby they have had Cause of Suspicion that shee may in her passions commit some Rash and violent Act.”

 

John Clavely of Little Missenden, gentleman, committed to gaol in default of finding sureties in respect of the bastard child of Mary Gould.

 

p. 448.  William Dancer, John Till, John Steele, and John Underwood, poor debtors in the gaol, admitted to an allowance of the County bread.

 

Certain justices appointed to hear the complaint of Thomas Harison that the overseers of Ivingho refused to provide him with work or with an allowance.

 

The price of salt reduced to 5s. 6d. a bushel.

 

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 17s. 4d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for fourteen weeks.

 

p. 449.  Order addressed to all constables, etc., to endeavour to find and apprehend William Alday, who escaped from the custody of the gaoler before the execution of his sentence of whipping and now “lurks and lyes hid in places obscure. [See p. 405.]

 

Memorandum that the royal proclamation concerning “Immorality and Prophaness” was read in open Court.

 

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The following Dissenters took the statutory oaths: John Cook and Jonathan Widmer, both of Chesham, yeomen, and Joseph Hobbs of Amersham.

 

p. 450. Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of Henry Martine [see p. 398], and John Fowler and William Porter [see p. 427].

 

p. 451. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above:  William Sheeney (p. 346), John Smith, Daniel Sweetser, Robert Reynolds, John Goodwin, William Coney, and Joseph Gate (p. 387), John Conningham, Robert Skevington, and Richard Whaley (p. 417).

James Price of Burnham, miller, in £40, and William Fowler of Woughton, carpenter, and John Clavely of Little Missenden, gentleman, in £20 each, all for bastardy.  (Sess. R. 1/57.)

 

Recognizance entered into.

John Fowler of Edlesborough, labourer, in £10, with Henry Martin of the same, labourer, as surety in £5, to appear and answer.

 

p. 452. Fines and issues.

William Barrett of Maidsmorton, and John King and Richard Waddopp, both of Chetwood, fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of the persons convicted on p. 450.

 

p. 453. Recognizances discharged.

Abraham Frye of Maidenhead, co. Berks., Robert Forth of Taplow, farmer, Joseph Darvall of Cookham, co. Berks., miller, Richard Purcell, gentleman, Edward Mason, yeoman, and James Price, miller, all of Burnham, Thomas Pounce of Farnham Royal, fruiterer, Joseph Porter of Langley Marish, butcher, Andrew Gussack of Burnham, victualler, John Dolling, farmer, and Elizabeth Dorrell, both of Dorney, William Fellowes of Burnham, yeoman, 

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Robert Westcott of Dorney, cordwainer, Thomas Nevill, bargeman, John Stanninot, blacksmith, Thomas Beck, bargeman, and William Aldridge, farmer, all of Taplow, Henry Sprigg of Farnham Royall, victualler, Thomas Stapers, labourer, Robert Howard, wheeler, and John Wigginton, husbandman, all of Great Marlow, Robert Brewer and Richard Clark, both of Marsh in Great Kimbell, labourers, Robert Brewer of North Marston, yeoman, Thomas Fowler senior, Thomas Fowler junior, and William Fowler, all of Woughton, carpenters, Ralph Pater of Stoney Stratford, labourer, George Manwaring of Newport Pagnell, victualler, John Fowler and Henry Martine, both of Edlesborough, labourers, Joseph Honnor, tailor, John Stevens, yeoman, and John Clavely, gentleman, all of Little Missenden.

 

Writ of capias ad respondendum addressed to the sheriff in respect of the following persons: John Tripp and Moses Bristowe, both of Longwyck in Princes Risborough, labourers, Thomas Hore of Halton, labourer, Samuel Bampton and William Lyndon, surveyors of Aylesbury, George Hayes of Wendover, labourer, Thomas Boorne of Bledlow, victualler, Thomas Saul, constable of Hanslopp, John Harris, alias Harrison, of Winslowe, labourer, Edward Dymock of Soulbury, yeoman, Thomas Ludgate of Nash in Whaddon, labourer, Hester Jane, widow, and Thomas Noare, yeoman, both of Ivinghoe, Edward Seare of Drayton Beauchamp, labourer, Thomas Weedon junior of Edlesborough, labourer, Richard Dale, labourer, and William Alderman, both of Great Horwood, Edward Gomme, constable of Ilmer, Richard Langley of Dorney, labourer, William Carter, bargeman, and William Hawding, alias Harding, labourer, both of Little Marlow, Nicholas Rose of Great Marlow, labourer, William Tylear of Horton, labourer, Nathaniel Carter, William Pitcher, and William Toovey, all of Ibstone in Turvile, yeomen, and Sarah Fellowes of Wendover, widow.  (None of them found.)  (Sess. R. 1/39.)

 

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

 

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QUARTER SESSIONS BOOK

VOLUME 6

 

EASTER SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

1st May, 1701 [13 William III]

 

p. 1. Jurors for the body of the county.

Adiel Hawes of Chesham, James Norwood and James Harding, both of Amersham, William Urlin of Iver, Thomas Bull of Lillingstone Dayrell, Jonathan Tow of Adstock, Thomas Ingram of Ackley, Abraham Durrant of Tingwick, John Meridale junior of Great Brickhill, John Turney of Stoke Hamond, Thomas Worster and William Playter, both of Cheddington, Richard Saywell of Ivinghoe, Richard Smallbrooke of Dinton, and Thomas Miller of GreatHampden.

(signed) Robert Weedon, esquire, sheriff.

The following were summoned but were not sworn: William Elliott of Great Marlow and Richard Jeffes of Adstock (“late”), William Garratt of Hanslopp, Edward Boswell of Lavendon (“none such”), Bennet Tompkins of Newton Longuevile (“excused”), John Markham and Arthur Smith, both of Little Horwood, John Mallett of Rowsham, John Catherall of Ivinghoe, Joseph Wells of Aston Clinton, and John East of Great Hampden.  (Sess. R. 1/36, 1/37, 1/40.)

 

p. 2.  Thomas Woods and Thomas Russon, bailiffs of Chepping Wycomb, produced sacrament certificates, which were certified by the Rev. Thomas Cordell, minister, and Thomas Wells and Jasper Ricketts, churchwardens, of Chepping Wycomb, and witnessed by John Rose and William Shrimpton, gentlemen.  (Sess. R. 1/32, 1/33.)

The Rev. Charles Cornish produced a similar certificate, certified by the Rev. Robert Fish, curate, and John Cowden and Thomas Cripps, churchwardens, of Kingsey, and witnessed by John Flexman and Thomas Burch, gentlemen. (Sess. R. 1/34.)

All the above also took the statutory oaths and signed the “Association.”

 

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Thomas Tingey of Newport Pagnell, gentleman, took the oaths as a Dissenter, and signed the “Association.”

 

p. 3. Convictions of swearers.

Charles Deane of Great Missenden, Daniel Ghost and Daniel Grey, both of Chesham, William Weston of Aston Clinton, John Stevens of Wendover, Thomas Brackley of Buckland, Henry Fox and John Cock, both of Choulsbury, Michael Baldwin of Monks Risborow, William Adean of Dinton, Phyllis Gravestock of Cublington, spinster, Luke Norcott of Broughton in Beirton, farmer, and Thomas Wattson of Wing, labourer, for one oath.

Henry Stevens of Amersham, butcher, John Row of Wing, labourer, and Henry Gillet, of Chesham, labourer, for two oaths.

William Tosil of Chesham, tailor, for three oaths.

John Brandam of Buckland, butcher, for four oaths.

 

p. 4. Indictments.

William Alday of Edgcott, labourer, for keeping a disorderly alehouse.  (Sess. R. 1/30.)

John Mercer, William Bishop, and John Turpin, labourers, Susan, wife of John Turpin, and Elizabeth Mercer, all of Weedon in Hardwick, for rioting and assaulting John Rogers, the constable.  (Sess. R. 1/31.

 

p. 5. Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes, Martha [Ann] Howes, Finch Howes and [Ann], his wife, Sir Edward Longvield, John Tipper, Mary Tipper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinckhurst, for recusancy.  [See note on page 71.] (Sess. R. 1/61 to 1/76.)

 

p. 6. Chief constables sworn.  (Sess. R. 1/77 to 1/93.)

Aylesbury . . . . Joseph Peddar of Great Missenden and William Verey of Cuddington, gentleman, vice Richard Stratfold and Edward Munday.

Newport . . . . John Goodman of Simpson and Richard

 

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Parratt of Hanslop vice John Chevall and John Ruddey.

Buckingham . . Edward Butterfield of Preston Bissett and John Woolhead of Maids Moreton vice William Parker and Robert Peridge.

Cottesloe . . Richard Bradbury of Sincleborow and William Wigg of the Grainge in Stewkley vice James Lucas and Joseph Bate.

Ashenden . . Richard Deely of Nether Wichendon and Edward Taylor of Borstall vice Thomas Mountagu and William Cozens.

Stoke . . . . David Perryman of Upton and James Stiles of Langley Marish vice Francis Bowrey and Richard Finch.

Desborough . . Edward Harding of the Hill in Wooborne and Richard Harding of Medmenham vice Henry White and John Janes.

Burnham . . . . William Jones of Farnham Royall and Thomas Worrall of Agmondisham vice Henry Messenger and Daniel Harding.

 

Treasurers sworn.  (Sess. R. 1/94 to 1/96.)

For the King’s Bench and Marshalsea   Henry Franklin of Great Marlow and  Richard Sawell of Nettleden, gentleman, vice Thomas Leeky and Christopher Payne.

For the maimed soldiers  John Barraby of Great Missenden and  Thomas Attwood of Maids Moreton, gentleman, vice Henry Playstow, deceased, and Josias Askew.

 

pp. 7-9. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Brandsfee . . . . John Roberdes as tithingman vice John Stevens.

 

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Beirton . . . . William Hore vice William Crispe.

Bishopstone . . Joseph Cleydon vice William Jennings.

Ellesborough . . Joseph Purnham junior and Richard Bryan junior vice John Prince and Geoffrey Hill.

Great Hampden . . John Ridall vice Humphrey Webb.

Little Missenden Thomas Peirce vice Thomas Grey.

Monks Risborough Richard Monke and William Aldridge vice John Tripp and Samuel Williams.

Brandsfee in Little

Missenden . . Giles Stalion vice Philip Reading.

Great Kimbell . . John Tappin and Jonathan Gourney vice Richard Clark and Thomas Ford.

Great Missenden Charles Deane and Edward Davison vice Edward Hore and John Bennett.

Walton . . . . Thomas Skillman vice Thomas Dover.

Hartwell . . . . Christopher Foster vice Francis Horton.

Stone . . . . Henry Clarke vice Richard Jennings.

Ashenden hundred—

Dorton . . . . William Clark vice Thomas Goodson.

East Cleydon . . William Wilson vice John Kelly.

Grendon Under- wood . . . . William Hide vice Joseph Mew.

Kingsey . . . . Ralph Rogers vice John Birch.

North Marston . . Edward Colten and Robert Dancer vice Thomas Tatham and Robert Fuller.

Shipton Lee in Quainton . . John Price vice Andrew Holt.

Studley . . . . Richard Coates vice Robert Saunders.

Wootton Under- wood . . . . John Parslow vice William Parrott.

Quainton . . . . William White vice William Robinson.

Wornall . . . . John Rogers vice John Woodbridge junior.

Newport hundred—

Haversham . . John Abbott vice Samuel Poland.

Astwood . . . . Abraham Kellow vice John Cox.

 

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Brafield . . . . William Bird vice Richard Ellington.

North Crawley . . William Wells and Thomas Page vice Thomas Nash and Thomas Hall.

Clifton Reynes . . John Sharpe vice William Hodell.

Stoke Hamond . . Thomas Fountain and Richard Frank- lin vice John Turney and Thomas Huldon.

Stoney Stratford . . Edward Penn vice Peter Harris.

Little Woolston . . William Emerton vice John Judge.

Fenny Stratford . . Matthew Cherry vice Nathaniel Ashton.

Great Woolston . . John Gilpin vice John Chadd.

Great Linford . . John Lake vice William Fidgen.

Eaton . . . . Edward Allin vice John Tayler.

Simpson . . . . William Slatyer vice George Etheridge.

Wavendon . . . . James Allen vice Edward Pearce.

Stoney Stratford East Side . . Robert Edge vice Anthony Ayres.

Burnham hundred—

Cheyneys . . . . William Cannon vice John Lewes.

Dorney . . . . William Griffin vice Nathaniel Hunt.

Sippinham in Burnham . . John Banister vice Robert Pither.

Beconsfield . . Henry Fellowes and Thomas Briars vice Samuel Roades and William Harding, and Thomas Plant and Ralph Taylor as tithingmen vice James Dearne and John Harding.

Desborow hundred—

Bradenham . . William Wingrave junior vice Edward Lamborne.

Hambleden . . Richard Dormer and John White vice William Hobbs and Abraham Deane, and John Dormer as tithingman vice Joseph Mowdy.

Hugenden . . John Fryer vice David Hawes.

Little Marlow . . John Wild vice Thomas Harding.

Ipstone in Turvile Robert Baldwin and John Dutton vice Richard Read and Christopher Tidbury, and William Luce as tithingman vice William Ratcliff.

 

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Stoke hundred—

Eton . . . . Silas Sebrough and John Slater vice Peter Milton and Thomas Andrews, and Richard Curtice and James Archer as tithingmen vice [John Cope and William Heither].

Horton . . . . William Russell and George Harison vice William Phillips and Daniel Brads, and Edward Almond as tithingman vice John Pike.

Hegerley . . . . John Penn vice Daniel Baldwyn.

Waxham . . Henry Pulford vice Philip Mitchell.

Cottesloe hundred—

Aston Abbotts . . Henry Whitborne vice George Page.

Cublington . . Robert Coles vice James Gardner.

Mentmore . . . . Isaac Seare vice John Knight.

Oveing . . . . Joseph Seare vice Joseph Coles.

Swanborne . . Benjamin Coles and William Beckley junior vice William Lane and John Hawkins.

Wing . . . . Simon Restall and John Monday vice William Hawkins and william Higgs.

Stewkley . . Edward Britnell vice Richard Brice.

Whitchurch . . William Brandam and Richard Toping vice Vincent Birdseye and Francis Gower.

 

Orders.

p. 10.  Order “that all petitions for money to be paid out of the County Stock shall be received the second day of the Sessions in the morning.”

 

Adjournment of the appeal of William Fowler of Woughton, carpenter, against a maintenance order in respect of the bastard child of Ann Geoffrays.

 

Order extending the recognizance of Mary, wife of William Vasper of Iver.

 

Order allowing the appeal of Boshiott, alias Bosiatt, co. 

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Northampton, against a warrant removing Elizabeth Watkins from Newport Pagnell.

 

p. 11.  Order dismissing the appeal of St. Clement Danes, co. Middlesex, against a warrant removing John Heath, servant, from Stoke End in Stoke Poges.

 

Order adjourning the case against the inhabitants of Buckingham.

 

Further adjournment of the appeal of Cheddington.

 

p. 12.  Order allowing a writ of certiorari in the case of the appeal of St. Clement Danes.  [See p. 11.]

 

Order allowing the appeal of Langley Marish against a warrant removing William Farrington and his wife from Farnham Royall.

 

Order staying further process against John Quaringdon of Wingrave, grazier tenant of Sir John Pakington, Bt., for certain pasture lands at Walton in Aylesbury, who was presented for not assisting in the repair of the highways there.  [See Vol. 5, p. 428.]

 

p. 13.  Order allowing the adjourned appeal of North Crawley against a warrant removing Charles Sutton, Hannah, his wife, and their three children, from Newport Pagnell.

 

Orders extending the recognizances of John Smith, Daniel Sweetser, Robert Reynolds, John Goodwin, and Joseph Gate (all sine die), Robert Skevington, Richard Whalley, John Brimley, and William Fowler.

 

p. 14.  The executors of the late Mr. Henry Playstowe, one of the late treasurers for the maimed soldiers, were ordered to pay the balance of County money in their hands to the clerk of the peace.  Out of this money the clerk of the peace was ordered to pay the constable of Denham £2. 3s. for his expenses in conveying vagrants.

 

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Order allowing the adjourned appeal of Great Haseley, co. Oxford, against a warrant removing Elizabeth Smith from Towersey.

 

p. 15.  Order dismissing the appeal of Princes Risborough against a warrant removing William Atkins, with his wife and family, from Great Missenden.

 

p. 16.  The justices allowed a certificate, addressed to Sir Nathan Wright, Knt., Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, asking him to grant Letters Patent “to collect the Charitable benevolence of well disposed people,” in the following case. A fire broke on the 16th April in the town of Haddenham and in three hours completely destroyed 197 “Bayes of Building,” value £2,263, and “divers other Out houses, Hovels, Stacks of Corn and Hay, and other Goods and Chattles,” value £1,452, belonging to John Hill, Dorothy Sale, widow, Daniel Franklin, and thirty-six others, who were thereby “totally impoverished and not able to subsist but must inevitably perish.”  The valuations were certified by William Nicolls, John Beachamp, and Henry Gosse, carpenters, Thomas Heath and Samuel Shrimpton, bricklayers.

 

p. 17.  Order discharging the indictments against William Pitcher, William Toovey, and Nathaniel Carter, on account of “insufficiency.”  [See Vol. 5, p. 428.]

 

Order confirming the usual rates of Servants’ wages, and continuing the order of reference to investigate the question of their alteration.

 

p. 18.  Usual order as to the rates for carriage of goods by land.  [See Vol. 4, p. 127.]

 

Order fixing the price of salt at 5s. 6d. a bushel.  [See Vol. 5, p. 337.]

 

p. 19.  Order giving the committee of justices further time in which to produce their report on the new gaol, and giving them power to fix the remuneration to be paid to Mr. George 

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Clisby and Mr. Robert Hitchcock, who have been assisting them.

 

John Plumridge of West Wiccombe, brickmaker, to be committed to gaol for refusing to obey a justice’s order to pay Thomas Sherwood £3. 4s. 6d. for work done.

 

p. 20.  John Rose, Henry Munday, and Matthew Annesly, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

 

Joseph Walker to be discharged from gaol.  He had been committed to keep the peace towards Elizabeth, his wife.  (Sess. R. 1/35.)

 

Francis Woodcock, the gaoler, to be paid £5. 2s. 6d.

 

John Michel, a poor debtor in the gaol, admitted to an “allowance of the County bread.”

 

p. 21.  Mary Chilbery, widow, to be allowed 1s. 6d. a week by the overseers of Taplow.

 

Mary Pratt, senior, Mary Pratt, junior, and William Chandler, the bakers of the County bread, to be paid £9. 4s., £8. 5s., and £9. 3s. 2d., respectively.

 

p. 22.  Alexander Olliffe to be paid £2 for maintaining Alice Maxfield for fifteen weeks.

 

Mr. Josias Askew, one of the treasurers for the maimed soldiers, ordered to pay Mr. Christopher Payne, one of the treasurers for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea, £20 in order to meet the deficiency in the money necessary “to answer the charge of conveying Criples and Vagrants.”

 

p. 23.   Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Sheene (Vol. 5, p. 346), John Smith, Daniel Sweetser, Robert Reynolds, William Coney, and Joseph Gate (Vol. 5, p. 387), Robert Skevington and Richard Whaley (Vol. 5, p. 417), William Fowler and John Clavely (Vol. 5, p. 451).

 

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John Brimley of Stoney Stratford, barber, in £10, with Richard Brimley, barber, and Richard Lack, labourer, both of the same, as sureties in £5 each, to answer in respect of the bastard child of Mary Welch.  (Sess. R. 1/56.)

William Vasper of Iver, labourer, in £10, with William Lewin, cordwainer, and John Apsley, labourer, both of Iver, as sureties in £5 each, for bastardy.  (Sess. R. 1/58.)

John Plomridge of West Wycomb, brickmaker, in £10, with John Shrimpton of Hugenden, brickmaker, as surety in £10, to keep the peace towards Thomas Sherwood.  (Sess. R. 1/44.)

 

pp. 24-25. Recognizances discharged.

James Price of Burnham, miller, John Conningham of Sherington, labourer, Timothy Burroughs, bricklayer, Robert Bennett, shopkeeper, and Andrew Burroughs, weaver, all of Chalfont St. Peters, John Robinson of Wooborne, cordwainer, Robert Bates of Beconsfield, butcher, William Rockall of Fingest, carpenter, John Reynolds, John Lloyd, Thomas Janes, Robert Reynolds, and Robert Perry, all of Great Kimbell, John Beckford of Little Gaddesden, co. Hertford, butcher, John Tomlins of Choulsbury, yeoman, Thomas Hill of Edlesborough, butcher, Richard Holloway, victualler, and Henry Smalley, cordwainer, both of Great Marlow, Charles Quarles of Bisham, co. Berks, maltster, Richard Stafford, wheeler, and William Rolls, carpenter, both of Burnham, John Hunt of Taplow, yeoman, William Ravelin of Boveney, labourer, and Jane, his wife, John Beach of Maiden- head, co. Berks, bargeman, William Norcott of Broughton, yeoman, William Bates of Bierton, yeoman, Richard Keen of Cublington, gardener, Robert Irons, Edward Hatton, and John Hart, all of Little Brickill, yeomen, Henry Hore, yeoman, and Thomas Stevens, butcher, both of Wendover, and Edward Hore of Great Missenden, yeoman.  (And see Sess. R. 1/45 to 1/49, 1/51 to 1/60.)

 

p. 26.  [Blank].

 

Calendar of the prisoners committed to the bridewell at Newport Pagnell:

 

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John Webb and Augustine Webb, both of Hanslopp; committed 20th January, discharged 2lst January.

William Carnall of Sherrington;  committed 3rd February, discharged 10th February.

Thomas Babington of Sherrington;  committed 12th February, discharged 18th February.

John Lamb of Emerton;  committed 25th February, discharged 3rd March.

Samuel West of Woofton on the Green; committed 4th March and discharged the same day.

Benjamin Coldredd; committed 11th April, discharged 12th April.

Pressed men, delivered by the deputy lieutenants:

John Farrar, Edward Brigs, Edward Withers, Robert Johnson, Joseph Tomson, and Samuel Gillett.  Delivered on 11th March, handed over to the sheriff on 29th March.

Pressed man from Northamptonshire:

John Andrews, Joseph White, William Hart, Thomas Hendery, Isaac Lazord, Stephen How, Samuel Strangwig, John Williamson, Samuel Drinkley, Michael Blackwell, Richard Clarke, George Harrison, Valentine Vane, Thomas Forest, Hugh Nixson, Benjamin Robery, Thomas Ingland, John Mayley, Douglas Carmile, Richard Baker, Charles Ould, Robert Jackson, and Joseph Wigmore.  [Document torn.]  (Sess. R. 1/41.)

 

Joseph Walker, committed 22nd April, and William Sheene, committed 10th February, were brought to the Court by the gaoler.  (Sess. R. 1/42.)

 

Robert Holloway of Great Marlow, victualler, committed to gaol for inciting his son, Robert, to desert his family. (Sess. R. 1/50.)

 

 

MIDSUMMER SESSION

AT AMERSHAM

17th July, 1701 [13 William III]

 

p. 27  Jurors for the body of the county.

Jonas Harding, David Salter, Arthur Clarke, Jonas

 

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Humfrey, Roger Fleetwood, James Kipping, John Bishopp, John Darvall, John Beck, John Cropper, Robert Green, William Glenister, Geoffrey Bampton, William King, and John Whitmell.  (Sess. R. 2/4.)

(signed) Robert Weedon, esquire, sheriff.

 

pp. 28-29.  Henry Bell and Joseph Bell, both of Aylesbury, gentlemen, took the statutory oaths; Leonard Wilkins of Quainton, grazier, and James Sells of Chesham, barber, took the oaths as Dissenters.  All four signed the “Association.”

Henry and Joseph Bell also produced sacrament certificates, certified by the Rev.  Isaac Lodington, minister, and Thomas Brookes and Joseph Bampton, churchwardens, of Aylesbury, and witnessed by Thomas Price.  (Sess. R. 2/6, 2/7.)

The Rev. Abraham Campion, D.D., rector of Monks Risborough, produced a sacrament certificate, certified by the Rev. William Stevenson, minister of Bledlow, and John Reynolds, churchwarden, of Monks Risborough, and witnessed by Thomas Stevenson junior and Richard Cox, servant. (Sess. R. 2/8, 2/9.)

 

p. 30.  The houses of the following persons were registered as meeting houses; Henry Cock of Parish End in Chalfont St. Gyles, Ellen Butler of Amersham, widow, Robert Jones of Princes Risborough, Elizabeth Rawlins of Hanslopp, widow, and Richard Puttenham, wheeler, and Nathaniel Turner, husbandman, both of Chesham.

 

p. 31. Convictions of swearers.

Richard Belson of Monks Risborough, victualler (for “twelve prophane curses”), William Barnaby, grazier, James Morgan and Henry Munday, innholder, John Reed and Saunders Miles, butchers, William Todd, Thomas Osborn senior, William Stoker and John Clarke, labourers, Richard Olyfe, Thomas Dawney, Stephen Underwood, Richard Dorrell, John Boan, and John Rance, servants, Richard Coles, William Brookes, and [Blank] Barrett, all of 

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Aylesbury, Richard Wilkins, Joseph Geary, “a youth under the age of sixteen years,” and Thomas Brackley, potter (for the second time), all of Buckland, Jonathan Cox of Dinton, Jane Norcott of Bierton, Jeremiah Arnett of Little Hampden, Thomas Wickersly of Great Kimbell, James Darvall, Thomas Winter, yeoman, and Henry Smith, labourer, all of Great Missenden, Richard Eccles, labourer, and Abraham Warner, weaver, both of Chesham, Thomas Horwood of Wendover, labourer, and Edward Avis junior of Choulesbury, blacksmith.

p. 32. Indictments.

Edward Hobbs and Edward Briggs, both of Stoney Stratford, labourers, for stealing some flaxen cloth from William Gurney of Parsenham, co. Northampton.  [Both to be whipped.]  (Sess. R. 2/1, 2/2, 3/1.)

Elizabeth, wife of Richard Brookes of Stoney Stratford, blacksmith, for receiving the above stolen cloth.  [Not guilty.]

John Beck junior, yeoman, and Michael Shirley, farmer, both of Dourton, for assaulting Richard Brangwyn.  [Fined 13s. 4d. each.]  (Sess. R. 2/4.)

Presentment of the grand jury.

Francis Homan of Westcott in Wadesden, labourer, for building a cottage without assigning four acres of land. (Sess. R. 2/3.)

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howes, Martha [Ann] Howes, Sir Edward Longvile, John Typper, Mary Typper, John Mawby, Ann Mawby, Frances Carter, Dorothy Waters, Thomas Crompton, and Mary Brinkhurst, for recusancy. [See note on page 71.]

p. 33. Petty constables and tithingmen sworn.

Aylesbury hundred—

Bledlow . . . . Moses Mallery vice John Chitch.

Bledlow Ridge . . John Raunce vice Thomas Chitch.

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Newport hundred—

Newton Longvile . . John Cook senior vice Geoffrey Hart.

Ashenden hundred—

Sherington . . James Cook vice John Cunningham.

Burnham hundred—

Burnham Town . . Thomas Poole vice Edward Bayley, and William Biddell as tithingman vice William Rowles.

Desborow hundred—

Woburne . . . . Robert Noy vice Thomas King, and John Pym as tithingman vice Jona- than Shrimpton junior.

Orders.

p. 34.  Orders extending the recognizances of William Fowler and John Brimley.

Order allowing the appeal of Wyrardsbury against a warrant removing [Blank], wife of John Carter, and her child from Great Marlow.

p. 35.  Richard Lamb to be given “a reasonable subsistance” by the overseers of Caversfield.  He lived in “a vill or member of the parish of Caversfield [which] lyeth in Stretton Awdley in the County of Oxon.”  [And see p. 70.]

Order allowing the appeal of Tring, co. Hertford, against a warrant removing William Hudson from Great Brickill.

p. 36.  Adjournment of the appeal of Newport Pagnell against a warrant removing William Cowley from Stoke Hammond.  [See p. 66.]

Order discharging the apprenticeship of Edward Turner to John Knolton of Eton, cordwainer.  Turner had been indicted for stealing a gold ring from Francis Peirson of Langley Marish, gentleman, and acquitted, but the Court, considering that he was “a vitious and theivish boy and his 

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Master not knowing what to do with him or how to govern him,” decided to discharge to apprenticeship and “to send him to sea.”

p. 37.  Order discharging the recognizance of Thomas Sear of Neither Wichendon, yeoman, in respect of the bastard child of Hannah Tuckwell of Aylesbury, spinster, as the child is now dead.

Order dismissing the appeal of Wendover against a warrant removing Richard Gutteridge and his wife from Great Missenden.

p. 38.  At the last Midsummer session the inhabitants of Buckingham were fined £2 for not appearing to answer an indictment for not repairing their highways [see Vol. 5, p. 389].  The money was in the hands of the bailiff of the hundred of Buckingham, and the inhabitants asked that it should be paid over to their highway surveyors.  They also claimed “that they have a perticuler Commission of the Peace for their said Town and parish and the Libertyes and precencts thereof which they are advised exempts them from the Jurisdiction of this Court” and that they had, therefore, been wrongfully fined.  After considering the question, the Court ordered the clerk of the peace to state a case and to submit it to the “great opinion and judgment” of Sir Edward Ward, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer.

p. 39.  Orders extending the recognizances of Robert Skevington, Richard Whaley, and John Beckford.

p. 40.  Order referring to the Judges of Assize the appeal of Upton against a warrant removing Elizabeth Wells from Hedgerly.  She had been in the service of Stephen Almond of Upton, but had been dismissed for misconduct.

p. 41.  The surveyors of Aylesbury authorized to raise a 6d. rate for the repair of their highways.

p. 42.  Adjournment of the appeal of Foskett against a 

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warrant removing Jane, wife of John Adams, labourer, from Chackmore in Ratcliffe.  [See p. 68.]

The committee of justices, who were considering the question of the new gaol, were given more time in which to produce their report.

p. 43.  The clerk of the peace ordered to prosecute Matthew Annesley, bridewell-keeper at Newport Pagnell, for allowing Edward Briggs to escape.

p. 44.  Giles Wellin to be discharged from gaol for want of a prosecutor, and Thomas English of Bradenham, labourer, to be discharged from the bridewell at Chepping Wycomb.

p. 45.  The chief constables complained to the Court that the new act for conveying vagrants had made their accounts “intricated and perplexed,” and that they had some difficulty in persuading the treasurers to pay them “any debts of surplusage” over and above the money collected from the petty constables, and handed by them to the treasurers. The Court recognized the fact that the cost of conveying vagrants had undoubtedly increased, and that the amount of money collected for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea, “and appropriated by the said Statute,” was not sufficient to meet these charges, whereas the funds in the hands of the treasurers for the maimed soldiers generally showed a balance after paying the necessary salaries and pensions.  They, therefore, ordered that in future the treasurers should pay all taxed bills presented by the chief constables without having recourse to the Court, and that the treasurers for the maimed soldiers should pay any bills which the treasurers for the King’s Bench and Marshalsea could not meet.

p. 46.  John Rose, Henry Munday, and Matthew Annesley, the bridewell-keepers, to be paid their salaries.

p. 47.  Mary Pratt senior, Mary Pratt junior, and William Chandler, the County bakers, to be paid their respective bills of £6. 12s. 8d., £4. 17s. 4d., and £6. 8s. 10d.

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p. 48.  Mr. Thomas Williams of Aylesbury, apothecary, to be paid his bill of £9. 14s. 10d. for medicines supplied to the gaol.

p. 49.  Silvester Dancer of Aston Clinton, Thomas Simons of Chepping Wycomb, and William Holdier of Kingsclear, co. Southampton, poor debtors in the gaol, to be admitted to an allowance of the County bread.

Thomas Lloyd to be discharged from the gaol, but, “for preventing any revenge he may exercise in the Town of Aylesbury for his Confinement,” it was ordered that the gaoler should “see him att Least six Miles from Aylesbury aforesaid before he receive his Liberty.”

Alexander Olliffe to be paid £1. 19s. 4d. for maintaining Alice Maxfield for eleven weeks, and £2 for clothing her for a year.

p. 50.  The auditing of the treasurers’ accounts was referred to the justices living in the hundred of Aylesbury.

Indictments confessed and traversed.

The convictions of John Beck and Michael Shirley. [See p. 32.]

p. 51. Recognizances extended.

The following, already given above: William Sheene (Vol. 5, p. 346), William Fowler and John Claveley (Vol. 5, p. 451), Robert Skevington and Richard Whaley (Vol. 5, p. 417), and John Brimley (p. 23).

John Beckford of Little Gaddesden, co. Hertford, butcher, in £10, with John Tomlins of Chowlesbury, yeoman, and Thomas Hill of Dagnell in Edlesborough, butcher, as sureties in £5 each, to keep the peace towards John Russell.

p. 52. Recognizances entered into.

William Ryley junior of Stoney Stratford, tapster, in £40, with William Robins of the same, labourer, and William 

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Ryley senior of St. John’s Street, co. Middlesex, leather- dresser, as sureties in £40 each, to answer in respect of the bastard child of Ann Muskett.

Richard Brookes of Stoney Stratford, blacksmith, in £40, for the appearance of Elizabeth, his wife, to answer a charge of felony.

p. 53. Fines and issues.

John Wade of Princes Risborough and Abraham Durrant of Tingwick fined £1. 10s. each for non-attendance on juries.

The fines of John Beck and Michael Shireley.  [See p. 32.]

pp. 54-55. Recognizances discharged.

Mary, wife of William Vasper, William Lewin, cordwainer, and John Apsley, labourer, all of Iver, Charles Blewitt junior, barber, Thomas Webb, oatmeal-man, and Thomas Pye, bargeman, all of Great Marlow, Valentine Knight and John Burton, both of Woolverton, farmers, Richard Cowley and Peter Atkinson, victuallers, William Ryley junior, tapster, and William Robins, labourer, all of Stoney Stratford, William Ryley senior, leather-dresser, and Thomas Smith, labourer, both of St. John’s Street, co. Middlesex, Thomas Tatham and Richard Willison, farmers, and Thomas Wells, gentleman, all of Drayton Parslow, Charles Price, Benedict Gawdrey, and Thomas Stopps junior, all of Whitchurch, yeomen, Michael Sherly of Dourton, labourer, James Collett of Wotton Underwood, grazier, Richard Hinn of Tettershill in Long Crendon, woodman, John Beck of Dourton, grazier, Anthony Davis, yeoman, and William Rose, brickmaker, both of Brill, Thomas Sear of Neither Winchendon, yeoman, Thomas Ray, yeoman, Edward Edwards, water-carrier, John Hawkes, tailor, and John Money, labourer, all of Aylesbury, James Walker and John Chitch, both of Bledlow, yeomen, John Davis, wheelwright, and Thomas Copland and William Dearman, farmers, all of Chalfont St. Peters, Henry Turner of Eton, Francis Pearson, gentleman, and James Styles, yeoman, both of Langley, Bartholomew Langley of Dorney, labourer, George Newman, gardener, and William Clarke, shoemaker, both of Burnham, 

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William Newman, labourer, George Newman, gardener, and Thomas Sexton, yeoman, all of East Burnham, William Gurney of Cottsgrave, co. Northampton, gentleman, William Collyer, victualler, Elizabeth Glenister and Rebecca Norton, spinsters, and Elizabeth Collyer, widow, all of Aylesbury.

End of this session, (signed) Thomas Smith, clerk of the peace.

p. 56. [Blank.]

 

 

MICHAELMAS SESSION

AT CHEPPING WYCOMB

9th October, 1701 [13 William III]

p. 57. Jurors for the body of the county.

Thomas Rose, William Fellow, Edward Weatherley, William Bass, Thomas Hale, John Hobbs, Thomas King, Robert Thorpe, Henry Baldwin, William Hill, Thomas Goodson, Thomas Burnham, Richard Towersey, Thomas Newinton, and Thomas Watson.

(signed) Robert Weedon, esquire, sheriff.

Jurors for the cases against Edward Hobbs, Edward Briggs, and Elizabeth Brookes.

Thomas Bell, Emanuel Wright, Michael Burnwell, John Darval, Henry Franklyn, Thomas Dew, Gabriel Stevens, John Chersley, Robert Oakley, Cornelius Burnham, Ralph Swinburne, and William Carter.

(signed) Robert Weedon, esquire, sheriff.

pp. 58-59.  Henry Bell of Aylesbury, gentleman, John Bigg, gentleman, mayor of Chepping Wycomb, and Joseph Loveday, headmaster of Chepping Wycomb Grammar School, produced sacrament certificates, took the statutory oaths, and signed the “Association.”

Bell’s certificate was certified by the Rev. Isaac Lodington, minister, and John Goldsworth and Matthias Dagnall, churchwardens, of Aylesbury, and witnessed by 

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John Burnham junior of Aylesbury, gentleman, and Joseph Heyward, citizen and goldsmith of London.  (Sess. R. 3/81.)

Bigg’s certificate was certified by the Rev. Thomas Cordell, minister, and Henry Franklyn and Thomas Winslow, churchwardens, of Chepping Wycomb, and witnessed by Joseph Loveday and William Shrimpton, gentlemen.  (Sess. (R. 3/82.)

Loveday’s certificate was certified by the Rev. Philip Davies, minister, and John Whitburn, churchwarden, of Bradenham, and witnessed by James Loveday and John Bigg.  (Sess. R. 3/83.)

The house of James Sells of Chesham was registered as a meeting house.  (Sess. R. 3/52a.)

p. 60. Convictions of swearers.

Simon Rastall, grocer, and Thomas Thorne, butcher, both of Wing, Perry Day of Amersham, Thomas Ray, Daniel Horne, Edward Edwards, John Bone, John Mayden junior, Gabriel White, John Rance, John Mayden, butcher, Robert Mayden, Alexander Druce, Thomas Dawney, Richard Shaw, and Edward Edwards, labourer, all of Aylesbury, Benjamin Sharp, William Darvall, Richard Charge, John Slye, William Pawley, William Charge, William Chadd, Nathaniel Avis, and William Darvill, innkeeper, all of Wendover, George Gutteridge and Thomas Stevens, labourer, both of Great Missenden, Nicholas Swaby, Joseph Axtell, Thomas Butler, Richard Foster, John Norcott, Henry Lathell, Thomas Pilgrim, and John Row, all of Aston Clinton, Christopher Reeve of Oving, Robert Groome of Whitchurch, Thomas Tayler of Winslow, William Mewe of Grendon Underwood, William Taylor and Thomas Taylor, butcher, both of Quainton, John Tattum and William Sheene, both of Beirton, Edward Lamborne of Cuddington, yeoman, Simon Howlett and Michael Baldwin, both of Little Kimble, Leonard Cole- man and Daniel Styles, both of Muncks Risborough, Thomas Coventry of Weston Turvile, William Hunt of Hartwell, John Porter, William Hill, hogseller, and Francis Southam, yeoman, all of Chesham, Henry Miles of Lee, butcher, and 

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William Collings of Great Kimble, tanner.  (Sess. R. 3/52, 3/53, 3/61.)

p. 61. Indictments.

Joseph Gibbs and William Gibbs, both of Fenny Stratford, butchers, for assaulting Thomas Stevens. (Sess. R. (R. 37/7.)

Elizabeth, wife of Robert Bennet of Dinton, labourer, for stealing chickens from Daniel Shepperd.  [To be whipped.] Sess. 3/4, 3/15, 3/50, 3/51, 3/78.)

James Blakeley of Great Marlow, petty chapman, for illegally selling bone-lace to William Irving, without being a craftsman in that trade.  [Not guilty.]  (Sess. R. 3/79.)

Indictments ignored by the grand jury.

Jeremiah Hollis of Great Marlow, labourer, for stealing twenty yards of cable rope from William East.  Thomas Sheeres, Matthew Church, Emanuel Wright, and Elizabeth Barnes were witnesses.  (Sess. R. 3/84.)

Mary, wife of James Blackman of Great Marlow, barge- man, for assaulting Mary, wife of William Todd.  (Sess. R. 3/85.)

William Irvine of Great Marlow, shopkeeper, for assaulting James Blakely.  Alexander Key was a witness. (Sess. R. 3/86.)

p. 62. Informations.

William George of Twiford, William Smith of Newton Longuevile, Thomas Parrott of Chesham, Thomas Ingram of Quainton, Thomas Adams of Westcott, Thomas Tayler of Iver, and William Eden, alias Udden, of Winslow, yeomen, Richard Wells of Simpson and Henry Proud of Chalfont St. Peter, higlers, and Thomas Stapp and John Stapp, both of Whitchurch, drovers, for trading as badgers without being licensed.  (Sess. R. 3 /80.)

Presentments of the constables.

Thomas Alexander, John Howse (since deceased), Sir 

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